Back to Search

Courses with keyword "BUSPH"

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III

How can data from both the micro (neighborhood and community) level and the macro (national, global) level be used effectively to inform and motivate policy change?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH3.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the creation of large national data platforms by combining health data, socioeconomic data, and climate change-related exposure data
  • Discuss the methodological issues in assessing the impact of climate-change exposures and health using large heterogeneous sources of data
  • Discuss evidence of climate change-related exposures and adverse health effects from 3 recent epidemiological studies using large national data sets

Moderator

  • Patrick Kinney

    Patrick Kinney
    @PATRICKKINNEY20

    Professor, Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Dr. Kinney joined the School of Public Health faculty in January 2017 as the inaugural Beverly Brown Professor of Urban Health. He was trained as an air pollution epidemiologist at Harvard School of Public Health, and came to BU after two decades at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. In his time at Columbia, he showed how warming temperatures make air pollution like urban smog worse, and more harmful to populations. He led the development of an integrated modeling system to predict the air pollution health effects of climate change into the future. Working at the intersection of climate change, health, and policy, Kinney has conducted research from the South Bronx to China to rapidly growing cities throughout Africa. At Columbia, he also created an interdisciplinary research and teaching program examining the potential impacts of climate change on health. At BU, Kinney is developing a new program that focuses on assessing the health benefits of urban climate action plans, via strategies to promote active transport, green infrastructure, and clean vehicles.

    Subject Matter Expert


    • Francesca Dominici
      @FRANCESCADOMIN8

      Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    • Francesca Dominici, PhD is the co-Director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative, at the Harvard University and the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the International Society of Mathematical Statistics. She is an expert in causal inference, machine learning, Bayesian statistics. She leads an interdisciplinary group of scientists with the ultimate goal of addressing important questions in environmental health science, climate change, and biomedical science. Her productivity and contributions to the field have been remarkable. Dominici has provided the scientific community and policy makers with robust evidence on the adverse health effects of air pollution, noise pollution, and climate change. Her studies have directly and routinely impacted air quality policy. Dominici has published more than 220 peer-reviewed publications and was recognized in Thomson Reuter’s 2019 list of the most highly cited researchers–ranking in the top 1% of cited scientists in her field. Her work has been covered by the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, BBC, the Guardian, CNN, and NPR. In April 2020 she has been awarded the Karl E. Peace Award for Outstanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society by the American Statistical Association. Dominici is an advocate for the career advancement of women faculty. Her work on the Johns Hopkins University Committee on the Status of Women earned her the campus Diversity Recognition Award in 2009. At the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, she has led the Committee for the Advancement of Women Faculty.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II

How can community-based organizations work effectively with academic institutions to address the effects of climate change in their communities? 

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe effective advocacy strategies employed by a community group (GreenRoots in Chelsea/East Boston) to address air quality and other environmental concerns
  • List 4 principles to promote climate justice (i.e., address climate adaption for vulnerable people in vulnerable places)
  • Describe 4 examples of actions that that US cities can take to address climate change
  • Describe the goals, activities, and achievements of the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA)
  • Explain research approach and methodologies to understand how housing characteristics are related to health impacts of heat among vulnerable populations

Moderator

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma

    Amruta Nori-Sarma
    @ASANSREASON

    Assistant Professor,  Boston University School of Public Health

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Health Department at Boston University School of Public Health, where she studies the relationship between environmental exposures associated with climate change and health outcomes in vulnerable communities. Her previous work has examined the impact of heat waves and air pollution on health in vulnerable communities in India, South Korea, and across the US. Her current research aims to understand the impacts of interrelated extreme weather events on mental health across the US utilizing large claims datasets. She also has an interest in evaluating the success of policies put in place to reduce the health impacts of climate change.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Marie S. O'Neill

      Marie S. O'Neill

      Professor,
      Department of Epidemiology,
      University of Michigan

    • Marie O’Neill (she/her/hers) has a B.A. from Brown University, an MS in Environmental Health Sciences from Harvard University, and a PhD in Epidemiology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Pan American Health Organization, and in Mexico at the National Institute of Public Health and the National Center for Environmental Health as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research interests include health effects of air pollution, temperature extremes and climate change (mortality, asthma, hospital admissions, birth outcomes and cardiovascular endpoints); environmental exposure assessment; and socio-economic influences on health. She served on the Federal Advisory Committee to the third National Climate Assessment. She is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences at University of Michigan School of Public Health and serves as Faculty Co-Lead for Diversity Equity and Inclusion at the School. She has been involved in several Federally funded research projects that address social disparities in climate effects on health, including a community-based participatory research project based in Detroit called Climate Hazards, Housing and Health.

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod

      Kathy Baughman McLeod
      @KBMCLEODFLA
      Director, Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, Senior Vice President Atlantic Council

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod leads the Center’s global strategy to reach one billion people worldwide with climate resilience solutions by 2030, with a special focus on society’s most vulnerable. She also chairs the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA), a global alliance of 40+ government officials, disaster relief organizations, climate scientists, public health and medical experts, businesses, and nonprofits, that is delivering early warning, policy, finance, and on-the-ground solutions, including appointing Chief Heat Officers in cities around the world. Additionally, she is spearheading the global push to name and categorize heat waves to save lives and build the culture of awareness and preparedness necessary to combat extreme heat. Kathy is currently a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Commission on “BiodiverCities by 2030” and a member of the Operating Committee of the Insurance Development Forum (IDF). Under her direction, Arsht-Rock is also a managing partner for the UN’s “Race to Resilience” campaign and Resilience Hub at COP26 — the UN’s flagship climate conference. Formerly, she served as Global Executive for Environmental and Social Risk at Bank of America, Managing Director for Climate Resilience at The Nature Conservancy — where she helped devise the world’s first insurance product on a natural asset; a 40 km stretch of the Mesoamerican reef in Mexico. She also served as Deputy Chief of Staff for the elected Treasurer/CFO of the State of Florida, where she was instrumental in making the Florida Treasury the first in the nation to publicly analyze and disclose the financial risks of climate. Kathy was also an appointed Florida Climate and Energy Commissioner. Baughman McLeod is the recipient of the Fuqua School of Business 2021 “Leader of Consequence” award and was appointed to the US Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council as its first-ever climate specialist in 2021. She holds an MBA from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and an MS in Geography from Florida State University.

    • Sharon Harlan

      Sharon Harlan

      Professor and Department Chair, Department of Health Sciences,
      Northeastern University

    • Dr. Harlan’s research explores the human impacts of climate change that are dependent upon people’s positions in social hierarchies, places in built environments of unequal quality, and policies that improve or impede human adaptive capabilities. Focusing on excessive heat and urban water systems as significant and increasingly critical threats to human health and well-being in cities, she studies social systems and landscapes that produce unequal risks for people in neighborhoods divided by social class and race/ethnicity. She has led multi-institutional, interdisciplinary research and community engagement projects that integrate social theories about the historical production of environmental injustices with data and models from the ecological, geospatial, and health sciences. She is currently conducting research on vulnerability to electrical grid failures and water affordability and accessibility in environmental justice communities across selected cities in the United States. Her coupled natural and human systems research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation on urban vulnerability to climate change, sustainability and water, the Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research program, and national and metropolitan area surveys on environmental attitudes and behaviors. She has served as an advisor on climate justice and social vulnerability to organizations such as the American Sociological Association, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Social Science Coordinating Committee of the U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program.

    • Roseann Bongiovanni

      Roseann Bongiovanni (CAS’99, SPH’01)

      @GREENROOTSEJ

      Executive Director, GreenRoots

    • Roseann Bongiovanni has worked for environmental justice for more than 25 years. Her extensive career began as a young organizer with the Chelsea Green Space Committee and included victories defeating the construction of a diesel power plant, and preventing ethanol “bomb” trains from traveling to a Chelsea Creek oil terminal. In 2016, Roseann transitioned this vital work into the independent environmental justice and public health organization, GreenRoots, which played a critical role in the response to COVID-19 in Chelsea and East Boston. Under her leadership, Chelsea was named a Culture of Health Prize Winner in 2017, GreenRoots was selected as a Social Innovator in 2018, and was named a US EPA Merit Award Winner in 2021. Roseann has raised and managed millions of dollars for major projects including Creekside Commons Park; federally funded air emissions reduction work, five urban growing spaces; murals and other public art projects; massive tree plantings; and multiple community parks. Roseann has received numerous awards for her work, including the Alternatives for Community and Environment Founders’ Award in 2001, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Hero Award in 2006 and the All Chelsea Award “Adult Resident of the Year” in 2007, an MLK Jr. Community Spirit Award by People’s AME Church in Chelsea in 2020 and a US EPA Merit Award in 2021. She has co-authored several publications. Roseann is a lifelong Chelsea resident, a former City Councilor, and City Council President. She has a Masters of Public Health from Boston University and is the mother of two strong-minded children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I

How can public health practitioners communicate accurate information about climate change to individuals and communities to motivate action?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    9:00 AM – 9:45 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session II
    Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss intervention activities that can and should be done immediately for short-term and long-term impact
  • Describe connections between climate change impacts and social determinants of health resulting in health disparities
  • List 5 environmental potential contributors to adverse effects on the mental health of young people
  • Define the roles and responsibilities of the new federal Office of Climate Change and Health Equity

Moderator

  • Greg Wellenius

    Greg Wellenius
    @GWELLENIUS

    Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Gregory Wellenius, ScD leverages his training in epidemiology, environmental health, and human physiology to lead research focused on assessing the human health impacts of the built environment in the context of a rapidly changing climate. His team has made a number of notable contributions to our understanding of the health risks associated with air pollution, noise pollution, other features of our physical environment, and those posed by a changing climate. A key goal of his team’s research is to provide the actionable scientific evidence needed to ensure that our communities are as resilient, sustainable, and healthy as possible, emphasizing the benefits to human health of climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. Before coming to Boston University, Dr. Wellenius served as faculty and Director of Brown University’s Center for Environmental Health and Technology and Elected Councilor of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE). He has previously taught courses on epidemiology methods, climate change and human health, and methods in environmental epidemiology. He has a strong track record of mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Wellenius is the 2019 recipient of the ISEE Tony McMichael Mid-Term Career Award and the 2018 recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Brown University School of Public Health.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • John Balbus

      John Balbus
      @DRJBALBUS
      Interim Director, Office of Climate Change and Health Equity, US Department of Health and Human Services

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Challenging Public Health: Saru Jayaraman

Only 7 states have legislation that requires full minimum wages for tipped restaurant workers. What will it take to change the laws in the other 43 states that will improve compensation for restaurant workers to be paid a livable wage? How does improving compensation for restaurant workers enhance public health?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, March 23rd, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CPHSJ.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Our Challenging Public Health series invites speakers from outside of public health to reflect on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This conversation features Saru Jayaraman, lawyer, activist, and founder of One Fair Wage. Jayaraman has written several books exposing the challenges faced by restaurant workers, including Behind the Kitchen Door: The People Who Make and Serve Your Food and Forked: A New Standard for American Dining.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the primary concerns of restaurant workers, and how they were highlighted and exacerbated during the pandemic, making restaurants the #1 most dangerous places to work during the pandemic (per CDC)
  • Describe current advocacy efforts to improve the wage structure for tipped restaurant workers to include full minimum wage plus tips

Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Saru Jayaraman

      Saru Jayaraman
      @SARUJAYARAMAN

      President, One Fair Wage

    • Saru Jayaraman is the President of One Fair Wage and Director of the Food Labor Research Center at University of California, Berkeley. After 9/11, together with displaced World Trade Center workers, she co-founded the Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC), which grew into a national movement of restaurant workers, employers and consumers. She then launched One Fair Wage as a national campaign to end all subminimum wages in the United States. Saru is a graduate of Yale Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She was listed in CNN’s “Top10 Visionary Women” and recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House in 2014, a James Beard Foundation Leadership Award in 2015, and the SF Chronicle ‘Visionary of the Year’ in 2019. Saru is also the author of four books including the forthcoming, One Fair Wage: Ending All Subminimum Pay in America (The New Press, November 2021). Additional publications include Behind the Kitchen Door (Cornell University Press, 2013), Forked: A New Standard for American Dining (Oxford University Press, 2016), and Bite Back: People Taking on Corporate Food and Winning, (UC Press, 2020). She has appeared on MSNBC, HBO, PBS, CBS, and CNN. She attended the Golden Globes in January 2018 with Amy Poehler as part of the Times Up action to address sexual harassment.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
Category: Webinars

Annual Shine Lecture: Sheri Fink - Patient Rights in Emergencies: The Right to Treatment and the Right to Refuse Treatment.

Who should be part of the decision-making process for medical care allocation in an emergency? What is the appropriate role for the patients themselves? Who gets to make the final decision?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 13th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_ASLPRE.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Boston University School of Public Health’s Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights presents the annual Cathy Shine lecture. The lectureship honors the memory of Cathy Shine and her dedication to the rights of all those in need of care. This year’s event will feature author and filmmaker Sherri Fink. Her best-selling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital focused on the tough choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is also the co-creator and executive producer of the Emmy-nominated documentary series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common challenges to medical ethics and health equity
  • Discuss ethical framework for how to prioritize allocation of medical care in a crisis
  • Discuss the elements of a just decision-making process
  • Assess lessons learned from experience in 3 real-life cases (Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, COVID-19)

Moderator

  • George Annas

    George Annas
    @GEORGEJANNAS

     William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health


  • George J. Annas is William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University and Director of the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights at Boston University School of Public Health, and a member of the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at the School of Public Health. He is also a Professor at the School of Law and School of Medicine. He is author or editor of 20 books on health law and bioethics, including The Rights of Patients (3d ed 2004), Public Health Law (2d ed 2014), American Bioethics (2005), Worst Case Bioethics (2010), and Genomic Messages (2015). He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the co-founder of Global Lawyers & Physicians, a NGO dedicated to promoting health and human rights.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Sheri Fink

      Sheri Fink
      @SHERIFINK

      Author, Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

    • Sheri Fink is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital about choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is a co-creator and an executive producer of the Emmy-nominated Netflix documentary television series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak (2020), filmed the year prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. Fink contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the pandemic. Her and her colleagues’ stories on Ebola in West Africa were recognized with the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the George Polk Award for health reporting, and the Overseas Press Club Hal Boyle Award. Her story “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” co-published by ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine, received a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and a National Magazine Award for reporting. Fink is an adjunct associate professor at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. A former relief worker in disaster and conflict zones, she received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her first book, War Hospital: A True Story of Surgery and Survival (PublicAffairs), is about medical professionals under siege during the genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Five Days at Memorial was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for nonfiction, the Ridenhour Book Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Book Award, the American Medical Writers Association Medical Book Award, and the NASW Science in Society Journalism Book Award.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Challenging Public Health: Michelle Holder

How did COVID highlight and exacerbate economic and employment conditions disproportionately among women and persons of color? What can we learn to change those conditions as we move forward?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 5th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CPHMH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Our Challenging Public Health series invites speakers from outside of public health to reflect on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This conversation features Michelle Holder, President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. Holder’s research focuses primarily on how the US job market discriminates against people of color, particularly Black women, who not only face a gender wage gap but a racial wage gap. She has written extensively on this subject, including The ‘Double Gap’ and the Bottom Line: African American Women’s Wage Gap and Corporate Profits, and more recently The Early Impact of Covid-19 on Job losses among Black Women in the United States.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the public health system underperformed during COVID from policy and political perspectives
  • Discuss evidence for disparate effects of COVID on job loss and negative economic effects across gender, race, and class lines
  • Discuss lessons learned to improve public health response to combat more effectively the disparate outcomes of COVID along racial and ethnic lines


Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Rebecca Traister

      Michelle Holder
      @MLHOLDER999

      President of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth; Associate Professor of Economics, John Jay College, City University of New York
    • Michelle Holder is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth as well as Associate Professor of Economics at John Jay College, City University of New York. Prior to joining the John Jay College faculty, she worked as an applied economist for a decade in both the nonprofit and government sectors. Her research focuses on the Black community and women of color in the American labor market, and her economic policy reports have been covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Amsterdam News, El Diario, and Dollars & Sense magazine. Michelle has also appeared on, or been quoted in, media outlets such as CNN, the Washington Post, NPR, The New Yorker, Black News Channel (BNC), PBS, MSNBC, Al Jazeera-English, Marketplace, and Vox.com. Her second book, Afro-Latinos in the U.S. Economy, co-authored with Alan Aja, was released May 2021 by Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield. Michelle received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from The New School for Social Research, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Fordham University.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 2: How Do We Reduce the Risk of Another Pandemic and Also Prepare for Another?

How can we ensure that we prepare for the next pandemic by broadening the approach past the infectious disease scientists – i.e., by including political scientists, behavioral scientists, local public health practitioners, health educators, journalists, community leaders, etc?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo   

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, April 8th, 2022
    12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: SS1131137_PNP2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and  Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 1: What Did We Get Right and What Did We get Wrong?
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

COVID-19 has readily made the point that the era of infectious diseases is far from over. And there are good reasons to think that with increasing urbanization and climate change, more large outbreaks and pandemics are in store. As we move away from an emergency response to dealing with the lasting impacts of COVID-19, it is critical that we learn the lessons around what we did well and what we did poorly and develop clear plans for preventing, where possible, and mitigating the impact of, when not, any future pandemic. Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Disease Policy and Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 6 key elements of preparedness for a future pandemic
  • Identify priorities to strengthen global clinical research capacities
  • Identify current World Health Organization (WHO) activities intended to enhance surveillance, testing capacity, and public health intelligence
  • Describe inequitable access to COVID vaccine and ideas to improve equitable access to medical countermeasures in future pandemics
  • Describe ideas to improve health care system resilience in the event of a pandemic
  • Discuss ideas to improve population-scale risk modeling, analytics, and forecasting
  • Describe characteristics of rural communities that make them particularly susceptible to effects of pandemics

Moderator

  • Matthew Fox

    Matthew Fox
    @PROFMATTFOX

    Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Matthew Fox, (SPH’02,’07) DSc, MPH, is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health at Boston University. Dr. Fox joined Boston University in 2001. His research interests include treatment outcomes in HIV-treatment programs, infectious disease epidemiology (with specific interests in HIV and pneumonia), and epidemiologic methods. Dr. Fox works on ways to improve retention in HIV-care programs in South Africa from the time of testing HIV-positive through long-term treatment. As part of this work, he is involved in analyses to assess the impact of changes in South Africa’s National Treatment Guidelines for HIV. Dr. Fox also does research on quantitative bias analysis and co-authored a book on these methods, Applying Quantitative Bias Analysis to Epidemiologic Data (http://www.springer.com/public+health/book/978-0-387-87960-4). He is also the host of a public health journal club podcast called Free Associations designed to help people stay current in the public health literature and think critically about the quality of research studies (https://bit.ly/30fPApj) and a podcast on Epidemiologic Methods called SERious Epi (https://seriousepi.blubrry.net/). He currently teaches a third-level epidemiologic methods class, Advanced Epidemiology as well as two other doctoral level epidemiologic methods courses. Dr. Fox is a graduate of the Boston University School of Public Health with a master’s degree in epidemiology and biostatistics and a doctorate in epidemiology.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Krutika Kuppalli

      Krutika Kuppalli
      @KRUTIKAKUPPALLI

      Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations, Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention, Health Emergencies Program, World Health Organization


    • Krutika Kuppalli, MD, FIDSA is a Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations in the Department of Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention in the Health Emergencies Program at the World Health Organization. She completed her Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Diseases fellowship at Emory University, a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego and was an Emerging Leader in Biosecurity Fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Dr. Kuppalli currently serves on the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Trainee Committee and is the Chair of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Global Health Committee. Dr. Kuppalli was previously a Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellow and conducted research in Southern India to understand barriers to care and how emerging infections impacted individuals living with HIV/AIDS. She was the medical director of a large Ebola Treatment Unit in Sierra Leone during the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, helped lead the development and implementation of pandemic response preparedness activities in resource limited settings, and has consulted on the development of therapeutics for emerging pathogens. Her clinical and research interests focus on health systems strengthening in resource limited settings, research and clinical care for emerging infections, outbreak preparedness and response, and policy. She has worked in Ethiopia, India, Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Haiti.


    • Jeffrey Shaman
      Jeffrey Shaman

      Professor,
      Department of Environmental
      Health Sciences,
      Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


    • Jeffrey Shaman is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Director of the Climate and Health Program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. He studies the survival, transmission and ecology of infectious agents, including the effects of meteorological and hydrological conditions on these processes. Work-to-date has primarily focused on mosquito-borne and respiratory pathogens. He uses mathematical and statistical models to describe, understand, and forecast the transmission dynamics of these disease systems, and to investigate the broader effects of climate and weather on human health.

    • Megan Ranney

      Megan Ranney
      @MEGANRANNEY

      Professor of
      Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical
      School; Academic Dean, School of Public
      Health, Brown University


    • Dr. Ranney is an emergency physician, researcher, and national advocate for innovative approaches to public health. She holds the Warren Alpert Endowed Professor of Emergency Medicine at Alpert Medical School of Brown University and is Founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health. She is also the Academic Dean at the School of Public Health at Brown University. Dr. Ranney’s research focus is on developing, testing, and disseminating digital health interventions to prevent violence and mental illness. She has had continuous external funding from federal and foundation grants for over a decade, with over 130 peer-reviewed publications. She serves multiple national leadership roles, including co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor for AFFIRM at the Aspen Institute (http://www.affirmresearch.org), a non-profit committed to ending the gun violence epidemic through a non-partisan public health approach, and President of the Board of GetUsPPE.org, a start-up non-profit that delivered donated personal protective equipment to those who needed it most. She is a Fellow of the fifth class of the Aspen Institute’s Health Innovators Fellowship Program and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network. She has received numerous awards for technology innovation, public health, and research, including Rhode Island “Woman of the Year” and the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Policy Pioneer Award. She is also a frequent media commentator on outlets ranging from the BBC to CNN to the New York Times. Dr. Ranney earned her bachelor’s degree in History of Science, graduating summa cum laude, from Harvard University; her medical doctorate, graduating Alpha Omega Alpha, from Columbia University; and her master’s in public health from Brown University. She completed her residency in Emergency Medicine and a fellowship in Injury Prevention Research at Brown University. She was previously a Peace Corps Volunteer in Cote d’Ivoire. She lives in Rhode Island with her husband and two children.

    • Tara Smith

      Tara Smith
      @AETIOLOGY

      Professor of Epidemiology, Kent State University

    • Dr. Smith’s research generally focuses on zoonotic infections (infections which are transferred between animals and humans). She has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, focusing on the epidemiology and transmission of livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus and science communication. She has received over $3 million in funding from AHRQ, USDA, and NIOSH to carry out these studies. She has presented her research at numerous national and international platforms, including talks on Capitol Hill on the topic of agriculture and antibiotic resistance. Her work has been profiled in many major publications, including Science, Nature, and The New York Times, as well as in “Superbug: the Fatal Menace of MRSA” by Maryn McKenna and “Pig Tales: an Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat” by Barry Estabrook. Dr. Smith is also very active in science communication and outreach. She has written books on Group A Streptococcus, Group B Streptococcus, and Ebola. She also co-edited “Ebola’s Message,” published in 2016 with MIT Press. She writes about infectious disease for many outlets, including Slate, the Washington Post, SELF magazine, Quanta, NBC News, and Foreign Affairs. She serves as a member of the advisory board of the Zombie Research Society. She lives in rural Ohio with her partner and children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 1: What Did We Get Right and What Did We Get Wrong?

A major lesson learned from the COVID experience is how critical coordination and collaboration in all realms have been. How can public health practitioners and researchers promote that within and across disciplines to prepare for the next pandemic?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo   

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, April 8th, 2022
    10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: SS1131137_PNP1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 2: How Do We Reduce the Risk of Another Pandemic and Also Prepare for Another?
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

COVID-19 has readily made the point that the era of infectious diseases is far from over. And there are good reasons to think that with increasing urbanization and climate change, more large outbreaks and pandemics are in store. As we move away from an emergency response to dealing with the lasting impacts of COVID-19, it is critical that we learn the lessons around what we did well and what we did poorly and develop clear plans for preventing, where possible, and mitigating the impact of, when not, any future pandemic. Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Disease Policy and Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss lessons learned about the role of clinical research and clinical research infrastructure related to development and testing of COVID therapeutics and vaccine development
  • Describe current state of evidence of the origin of the COVID virus and the ramifications of understanding the specific origin
  • Describe how well lessons learned from previous infectious disease outbreaks (e.g., H1N1, SARS, Ebola) informed response to COVID
  • Discuss the ramifications of different societal approaches to COVID across the range of personal autonomy and responsibility through collective action

Moderator

  • Dr. Bhadelia

    Nahid Bhadelia
    @BHADELIAMD

    Director, Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research; Associate Director, National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories

  • Dr. Bhadelia is the founding director of BU Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research and an associate director of the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), a state-of-the-art maximum containment research facility at BU. She is a board-certified infectious diseases physician and an internationally recognized leader in highly communicable and emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) with clinical, field, academic, and policy experience in pandemic preparedness and response. Over the last decade, Dr. Bhadelia designed and served as the medical director of the Special Pathogens Unit (SPU), a medical unit designed to care for patients with highly communicable diseases, and a state designated Ebola Treatment Center. She has prior and ongoing experience in health system response to pathogens such as H1N1, Zika, Lassa fever, Marburg virus disease, and COVID-19 at the state, national, and global levels, including medical countermeasure evaluation, diagnostic positioning, infection control policy development, and healthcare worker training. Dr. Bhadelia serves on state, national, and interagency groups focused on biodefense priority setting, development of clinical care guidelines, and medical countermeasures research. She has served as a subject matter expert to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Defense (DoD), and World Bank.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Natalie Dean

      Natalie Dean
      @NATALIEXDEAN

      Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

    • Dr. Natalie Dean (CAS’09) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics and in the Department of Epidemiology at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health. She received her PhD in Biostatistics from Harvard University, and previously worked as a consultant for the WHO’s HIV Department and as faculty at the University of Florida. Her primary research area is infectious disease epidemiology and study design, with a focus on developing innovative trial and observational study designs for evaluating vaccines during public health emergencies. She has previously worked on Ebola, Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and now COVID-19. She received the 2020 Provost Excellence Award for Assistant Professors at University of Florida. In addition to research, she has been active in public engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is verified on Twitter with over 120k followers and has authored pieces in outlets such as the Washington Post, New York Times, and Stat News. Dr. Dean is also a proud alum of Boston University, receiving her bachelors in Biology and Mathematics/Statistics from the College of Arts and Sciences.

    • Angela Rasmussen

      Angela Rasmussen
      @ANGIE_RASMUSSEN

      Research Scientist, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan

    • Dr. Angela (Angie) Rasmussen, PhD is a virologist at the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on the role of the host response in viral pathogenesis, with a particular interest in emerging viruses that are or have the potential to be major threats to global health, such as avian influenza, dengue virus, Ebola virus, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2. Her work combines classical experimental virology and animal models with systems biology approaches to study the global response to infection and how that contributes to pathogenesis or protection from emerging pathogens. Dr. Rasmussen graduated from Smith College with a BA in Biological Sciences (2000) and received a MA (2005), MPhil (2006), and PhD (2009) in Microbiology and Immunology from Columbia University. She did her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington and previously held faculty positions at the University of Washington and the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health. In addition to her primary appointment at VIDO, Angie is also affiliated with the Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security. She is a member of the Verena Consortium, a multi-disciplinary, international effort to predict and study emerging viral pathogens, as well as the Communications Director for the CoVaRR-Net research consortium. She is also a member of the WHO Ad Hoc Expert Committee for Preclinical Models of COVID-19 and sits on the Editorial Boards at Vaccine, mSphere, and Cell Reports. In addition to her research, Dr. Rasmussen is a prolific science communicator on both social media and in the mainstream press, as well as a writer for numerous publications including Forbes, Leaps.org, Slate, Foreign Affairs, the Washington Post, and the New York Times. She is passionate about advocating for equity in biomedical research and public health, and is a member of the US NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Changing the Culture to End Sexual Harassment, as well as a faculty mentor for the volunteer science education group Wearing is Caring. She believes strongly that biosecurity and global public health must be collaborative international efforts and is eager to extend this outreach work in Canada and abroad.

    • Maria Sundaram

      Maria Sundaram
      @MARIASUNDARAM
      Associate Research Scientist, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute

    • Maria Sundaram, MSPH, PhD is an infectious disease epidemiologist and Associate Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health at the Marshfield Clinic Research Institute. Her research focuses on respiratory viruses and the vaccines that prevent them, as well as vaccine promotion and policy. Her research has included estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness with the CDC-based US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network, and describing the epidemiology of RSV in young children and older adults in rural areas. More recently, her research showed COVID-19 testing inequities had the potential to create bias in COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness estimates. She is also a weekly guest expert on the BBC World Service’s radio program Outside Source, where she answers listener questions about SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, and vaccines.

    • Rajeev Venkayya

      Rajeev Venkayya
      @RVENKAYYA

      Chief Executive Officer, Aerium Therapeutics; Board Member, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI)

    • Dr. Rajeev Venkayya is the CEO of Aerium Therapeutics, a venture-backed co. developing therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses with pandemic potential. He was the President of the Global Vaccine Business Unit at Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd, a position he held until February 2022, where he led a vertically-integrated business developing vaccines for dengue and Zika. He also oversaw partnerships with the Japanese Government to supply COVID-19 and pandemic influenza vaccines. Dr. Venkayya serves as an independent member of the board of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. While at Takeda, he served as a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) Leadership Team, a public-private partnership to prioritize and speed development of the most promising treatments and vaccines. Prior to joining Takeda, Venkayya served as director of Vaccine Delivery at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Program and served on the board of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Before that, he was special assistant to the president for Biodefense at the White House. In this capacity, he oversaw US preparedness for bioterrorism and biological threats and was responsible for the development and implementation of the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza. Venkayya trained in pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also served on the faculty. He was resident and chief medical resident in internal medicine at the University of Michigan.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement

        This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

The Health Consequences of War

How can an understanding of the range of war’s effects on refugees allow public health and healthcare practitioners in the US to provide appropriate and effective care for wartime refugees in our communities?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 29th, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HCW
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

As the war in Ukraine unfolds, the world is beginning to bear witness to the consequences being experienced by the Ukrainian people. This Conversation brings together experts who have studied other conflicts to discuss what we know about the long-term effects of war on the health of populations.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the effects of war on the mental health of children, youth, and families and types of interventions that have shown to be effective in addressing those effects
  • Describe the challenges to and lessons learned from providing nutritional support and medical care to persons in the Syrian conflict
  • Discuss the impact of violence on health care providers and facilities in Ukraine, as well as historical experience of prior conflicts (Afghanistan, sub-Saharan Africa)
  • Compare and contrast effects of conventional warfare (effects on battlefield relatively well understood) vs. “hybrid” warfare (effects on civilians and society; medical consequences unknown)

Moderator

  • Tiziana Dearing

    Tiziana Dearing
    @TIZIANA_DEARING

    Host, WBUR’s Radio Boston

  • Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston on WBUR. She’s been a commentator and contributor to WBUR for more than a decade, and has contributed to a number of other regional and national news outlets. Prior to joining the Radio Boston team, Tiziana was a professor at Boston College in the School of Social Work, where she taught social innovation and leadership. A longtime anti-poverty advocate, Tiziana also ran Boston Rising, a startup antipoverty fund to end generational poverty in Boston, and was the first woman president of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Boston. She’s won a number of awards in the city, including a Pinnacle Award from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Theresa Betancourt

      Theresa Betancourt

      Salem Professor
      in Global Practice,
      Boston College

    • Theresa S. Betancourt is the inaugural Salem Professor in Global Practice at the Boston College School of Social Work and Director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her primary research interest is to understand the protective processes that contribute to risk and resilience in the mental health and development of children and adolescents facing adversity in a variety of cultures and settings. Dr. Betancourt has led several initiatives to adapt and test evidence-based behavioral and parenting interventions for children, youth, and families facing adversity due to poverty, illness, and violence. Dr. Betancourt additionally focuses on strategies for scaling out these interventions using implementation science approaches. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Dr. Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence that can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in Rwanda. In the US, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. through the collaborative development and evaluation of parenting programs led by refugees for refugees that can be linked to prevention services involving refugee community health workers. Dr. Betancourt has served on the advisory board for the 2021 UNICEF State of the World’s Children report, titled, “On My Mind: Promoting, Protecting, and Caring for Children’s Mental health.” Additionally, she has advised Amnesty International on a key advocacy report on mental health in Sierra Leone entitled ““They are forgetting about us:” The Long-term mental health impact of war and Ebola in Sierra Leone.” Dr. Betancourt serves on a high-level World Health Organization Mental Health Gap Topic Expert Group (TEG), the Lancet Commission on Gender Based Violence and Maltreatment of Young People, as well as serve as a thematic advisor for the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) for a series of workshops on Violent Extremist Disengagement, Reconciliation, Trauma Recovery. Dr. Betancourt has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com, and in an interview with Larry King on the program, “PoliticKing.”

    • Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Doctor & Research Associate, King's College, London

    • Dr. AbdulKarim Ekzayez is a Syrian medical doctor specializing in epidemiology and health systems. His current work at King’s College focuses on health systems strengthening in conflict areas and on building the research and policy capacity of the health sector in conflict-affected areas of the Middle East. He is currently a lead applicant for a large project funded by the National Institute for Health Research called “Research for Health System Strengthening in Northern Syria R4HSSS”. He is also involved in several other projects and research with other academic and policy institutes including LSHTM, AUB, Chatham House and others. His research focuses on issues related to health system building in conflict settings and early recovery, health care protection challenges, and the health impact of conflict. In 2013, Karim was training to be a neurosurgeon when his residency was interrupted by the war. He joined Save the Children in North West Syria, where he led the health response until 2017 – helping build the primary health care system, restarting routine vaccinations, and supporting the rebuilding of the health system in northern Syria using a bottom up approach. Dr. Ekzayez is a regular contributor to several medical and civil society institutions in Syria, and has been active in advocacy for Syria through media and conferences. He is a trustee member of two NGOs, Shafak and Refugee Trauma Initiative and a managing director of the Syrian British Council which is a lobbying and advocacy body in the UK. He received his MD from Aleppo University and his MSc from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Also, he completed a one-year residential fellowship on leadership in international affairs from The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs at Chatham House; and another one-year fellowship in international cultural relations from the Institute for International Cultural Relations at The University of Edinburgh. He is also pursuing his PhD in public policy from King’s College London.

    • Larissa Fast

      Larissa Fast

      Doctor, Humanitarian and Conflict Studies, University of Manchester

    • Professor Fast is working at the intersection of the worlds of academia, policy, and practice. Her research addresses two fundamental problems: how best to protect civilians, particularly those who intervene in violent conflict, and how to make such intervention more effective, ethical, and responsive to local needs and circumstances. In addition to her book Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism, she has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and policy reports. Professor Fast worked for both government and non-government agencies as a project manager, consultant, and analyst, and provided training to individuals and organizations in peace building and conflict analysis. Prior to her current position at Manchester, she was a Senior Research Fellow at ODI’s Humanitarian Policy Group, a Fulbright-Schuman Research Scholar (2016-2017), and a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow (2014-2016) at USAID’s Global Development Lab. She has also held faculty positions at the Kroc Institute at the University of Notre Dame (USA) and Conrad Grebel University College (University of Waterloo, Canada).

    • Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Doctor & Senior University Lecturer, University of Gothenburg

    • Dr. Khorram-Manesh serves as university lecturer in surgery with particular focus on disaster medicine, mass casualty management and trauma. He is also a Visiting professor at numerous universities, currently the National Institute of Emergency Medicine of Thailand and Mahidol University in Bangkok. He has published over 100 papers, book chapters and books. His current research interests are in multiagency collaboration in emergencies, introduction of the Flexible Surge Capacity concept, Civilian-Military collaboration and its related challenges, development of emergency medicine in middle and low-income countries, hospital safety in disasters and public health emergencies. He is equally active in introduction of educational initiatives such as simulation trainings and exercises within the field of disaster and emergency medicine.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Travel Restrictions During Pandemics: Considerations and Consequences

Have the benefits of implementing cross-border travel bans aimed at containing the spread of disease outweighed the potential adverse effects on limiting the availability of health workers, the increase of xenophobia, and use based on political motivations rather than potential for improving public health?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 1st, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_TRDPCC.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Cross-border travel bans have long been controversial in public health. While travel bans may help contain disease spread, there are also concerns that they may limit the availability of health workers where needed, and that they may encourage xenophobia. During the COVID-19 pandemic, travel bans were implemented widely by many countries (U.S. included), in an effort to contain the virus and control its spread. But how effective were they in suppressing the spread? Is it fair to look at the effectiveness of these bans without considering if they do more harm than good? Dr. William J. Bicknell endowed this lectureship to support excellence, rigor, imagination and risk-taking in the teaching and practice of public health through annual lectures.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the legal right to restrict travel in the United States and its potential for misuse
  • Describe the legal framework and principles that can provide structure for decision making about international travel restrictions in times of uncertainty
  • Discuss the evidence for the effectiveness of travel restrictions in decreasing the transmission of disease and reducing risk
  • Discuss the evidence for the role of COVID testing and vaccines in travel restrictions
  • Describe lessons learned about quarantine, isolation, and travel restrictions from the historical example of yellow fever

Moderator

  • Sharmila Devi

    Sharmila Devi
    @SHARMILADEVI2

    Writer and Editor

  • Sharmila Devi is a writer and editor with more than 25 years’ experience working for international agencies, newspapers and consultancies. She was a correspondent in the Middle East and Africa, including more than five years as the Jerusalem correspondent for the Financial Times during the second intifada, and has reported developments in politics, economics, global health and climate change. She also worked in New York as correspondent for the UAE-based National newspaper and in Iraqi Kurdistan as a correspondent for the English-language service of the local media network Rudaw during the conflict with ISIS. She writes and edits major reports for NGOs such as Unicef and for political risk consultancies about politics and global health. She is a long-standing contributor to the world report pages of The Lancet, writing about global health issues, conflict and humanitarian crises. She covered the COVID-19’s impact around the world, including how travel restrictions hampered the global response to the pandemic.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Sondra Crosby

      Sondra Crosby
      @SONDRACROSBY16

      Associate Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health

    • Sondra Crosby, MD is a medical doctor and Professor of Medicine at Boston University, specializing in internal medicine. She is also a faculty member of the Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights department at the Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Crosby is notable for being one of the first doctors allowed to travel to Guantanamo to independently examine Guantanamo captives. She is also notable for serving as the director of medical care at the Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights. She examined over 300 torture victims at the Center. Dr. Crosby is one of the authors of Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by the US, published by Physicians for Human Rights. According to Physicians for Human Rights, Dr. Crosby has “written over 200 affidavits documenting medical and psychological sequelae of torture.”

    • Eskild Petersen

      Eskild Petersen
      @AARHUSUNI_INT

      Professor Emeritus, Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark

    • Professor Eskild Petersen is a Professor Emeritus of Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Aarhus University, Denmark. He chairs the ESCMID Emerging Infections Task Force, Basel, Switzerland. Professor Petersen is internationally renowned for his extensive contributions to global health, therapeutic drug monitoring, multi-drug resistant infections, implant associated infections, travel medicine and emerging infections. Professor Petersen graduated in 1978 from Medical School, University of Aarhus, Denmark; 1980 Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, University of Liverpool; 1985 Specialist Degree in Infectious Diseases; 1988 Specialist Degree in Tropical Medicine; 2002 Master of Business Administration, Copenhagen Business School; 2005 DMSc., Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. He served six years on the board of the ESCMID Study Group on Migration and Travel Medicine, lecturing on immunizations in pregnancy on several ESCMID workshops. Professor Petersen retired from clinical service in June 2020. He is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Infectious Diseases since 2012. Associate editor of Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases. 2010-2018, on the Editorial board of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, American Association of Clinical Microbiology. 2011–2012 Editorial board, Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. 2011 – 2012. 1999 – Co-Editor (Moderator) on parasitic diseases. ProMED (www.promedmail.org). Professor Petersen has published over 350 original papers in peer reviewed journals with an H-index of 53. He has edited several textbooks, including the popular textbooks “Infectious Disease: a Geographic Guide”.

    • Barbara Von Tigerstrom

      Barbara Von Tigerstrom
      @USASKLAW

      Professor, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan

    • Barbara von Tigerstrom is a Professor at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, where she has been a member of faculty since 2005, after working at the University of Alberta Health Law Institute and the University of Canterbury School of Law. She holds a law degree from the University of Toronto and Ph.D. in law from the University of Cambridge. She has received several awards for excellence in teaching and research, and research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Stem Cell Network, among others. Dr. von Tigerstrom’s main areas of teaching and research are health law and policy, information and privacy law, and tort law. Her work in public health examines domestic and international legal issues relating to both infectious and non-communicable diseases. Since March 2020 she has been engaged in a research project funded by the CIHR on the International Health Regulations (IHR) and COVID-19 (with Principal Investigator Dr. Kumanan Wilson and others), with her work focusing on travel restrictions and the IHR. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. von Tigerstrom contributes her expertise to University and external committees including the University of Saskatchewan Biomedical Research Ethics Board and the Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan.

    • Samantha Vanderslott

      Samantha Vanderslott
      @SJVANDERS
      University Research Lecturer at Oxford Vaccine Group, University of Oxford

    • Samantha Vanderslott is a University Research Lecturer at the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford working on health, society, and policy topics. Her current projects are about: policies for neglected tropical diseases; outbreak response; a history of typhoid fever; and attitudes to vaccines. She draws on perspectives from sociology, anthropology, history, global health, and science and technology studies (STS).

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Health care in the big city during COVID-19

How do we translate lessons learned from the pandemic about social and health inequities in creating a better “new normal” in healthcare?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 25th, 2022 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HCBCDC19.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

February 1 marked the two-year anniversary of Boston’s first confirmed COVID-19 case. Since then, the pandemic has changed the way health care is delivered throughout the city and new issues continue to emerge (e.g., employee burnout, supply shortages) that challenge the sustainability of our hospitals. In this conversation, we will hear from the presidents of two of Boston’s health systems for a conversation about lessons learned, current issues, and the forging a sustainable path forward.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss lessons learned about the impact of the COVID pandemic on hospitals and health care systems
  • Describe the behavioral and mental health effects of the pandemic observed in pediatric patients at a major metropolitan children’s hospital and ramifications going forward
  • Discuss the projected future of telehealth driven by the pandemic but now an important part of the healthcare delivery model
  • Discuss the importance of the hospital in community engagement to increase vaccination rates and to address health disparities

Moderator

  • Chris Louis

    Chris Louis
    @CHRISLOUIS628

    Clinical Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Chris Louis, PhD, MHA is Clinical Associate Professor of Health Law, Policy, and Management at the Boston University School of Public Health. He is also the Director of the Health Care Management Program and the Director of BUSPH Dual Degree Programs (JD/MPH, MD/MPH, MS/MPH, MSW/MPH, MBA/MPH). His primary research interests reside in health care organization and delivery, Medicaid innovation programs, cancer care, children with medical complexity, and large-scale program evaluation. He is currently a Principal Investigator on multiple state, federal, and private program evaluations and research grants. These projects include an American Cancer Society grant focused on understanding breast cancer screening practices in the Appalachian region, an evaluation of the current Arkansas Section 1115 Medicaid waiver, and an evaluation of a HRSA-funded grant seeking to improve care for children with medical complexity. He has published recently on breast cancer care delivery, Medicaid reform, and accountable care in journals such as the Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law, Health Care Management Review, and the American Journal of Accountable Care. Dr. Louis has nearly a decade of health care industry experience in strategy, operations, and project management. Dr. Louis’ past experience includes serving as a consultant and hospital administrator in CT, FL and NJ. Dr. Louis earned his PhD from Penn State University in Health Policy & Administration. He also holds a Master of Health Administration (MHA) from the University of Florida and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Sacred Heart University.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Kevin Churchwell

      Kevin Churchwell
      @BOSTONCHILDRENS

      President and Chief Executive Officer, Boston Children's Hospital

    • Kevin B. Churchwell, MD, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Boston Children’s Hospital, providing leadership, vision, and oversight for a team that’s dedicated to improving and advancing child health through their life-changing work in clinical care, research and innovation, medical education, and community engagement. Since joining Boston Children’s as its Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Chief Operating Officer in 2013, Dr. Churchwell has been instrumental in leading the hospital’s work to become a High Reliability Organization, one where zero avoidable harm impacts any patient, family member, or employee. He has brought to Boston the same passion for enhancing the patient family experience that defined his tenure as CEO of both Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, and Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, part of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. An advocate for equity, diversity and inclusivity, Dr. Churchwell is responsible for establishing three of the 11 Offices of Health Equity and Inclusion at hospitals across the U.S. and Canada, including the Office at Boston Children’s, which he founded in 2016. With the publication of Boston Children’s own Declaration for Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity in 2020, Dr. Churchwell has committed to the work required to make Boston Children’s a community that’s made stronger by our differences, and a leader in equity for all. A graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, Dr. Churchwell completed his pediatric residency and a clinical fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care at Boston Children’s Hospital. He is currently an Associate Professor of Pediatric Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Dr. Churchwell is the Robert and Dana Smith Associate Professor of Anesthesia at the Harvard Medical School. Disclosures: Dr. Churchwell is a member of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, a board member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Whitehead Institute, Advisory Board for The Boston University School of Public Health, and the Boys and Girls Club of Boston.

    • Kate Walsh

      Kate Walsh
      @KATEWALSHCEO

      President and Chief Executive Officer, Boston Medical Center

    • Kate Walsh is president and CEO of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) health system, with annual operating revenue of $4.9 billion. BMC is a private, not-for-profit, 514 bed, academic medical center dedicated to meeting all the needs of its patients, needs that often transcend the scope of traditional medicine like food and housing insecurity, and advancing health equity within the communities it serves. The primary teaching affiliate of Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center has nearly 6000 employees and 755 physicians who are affiliated with Boston University Medical Group. BMC Health System also includes the BMC HealthNet Plan, a Medicaid Managed Care Organization with more than 400,000 members in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and Boston HealthNet, a network affiliation of 14 community health centers throughout Boston. Prior to her appointment at Boston Medical Center, Ms. Walsh served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She served previously as the chief operating officer for Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and at Massachusetts General Hospital in positions including senior vice president of medical services and the MGH Cancer Center. Prior to her tenure at Mass General, she held positions in a number of New York City hospitals including Montefiore, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Saint Luke’s – Roosevelt Hospital Center and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Ms. Walsh received her bachelor of arts degree and a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. She has served as a member of the Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and currently serves on the Boston Public Health Commission, the Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, Pine Street Inn, and Yale University.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II

How can public health practitioners work with community partners to address underlying causes (social determinants) of trauma in their community?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how trauma (interpersonal, collective, cultural, and experience of loss) can be seen as a social determinant of health
  • Explain race and racism as a risk factor for trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Describe prevalence and predictors of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among youth based on results of Maryland Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  • Discuss non-uniform policing practices as a contributor for trauma as a social determinant of health

Moderator

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Jaimie Gradus
    @JAIMIEGRADUS

    MODERATOR Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus’s research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Maryam Jernigan-Noesi

      Maryam Jernigan-Noesi
      @JERNIGMA

      Founder, Jernigan & Associates Psychology and Educational Consulting

    • Addressing the needs of diverse youths, adults, and families has been the primary focus of Dr. Jernigan-Noesi’s work as a clinician and scholar. She recognizes that not all traditional psychological approaches that serve to meet the needs of some, are effective for persons from all backgrounds. Dr. Jernigan-Noesi prides herself on the integration of context, culture, and social factors that may influence health and wellbeing. Clinically, Dr. Jernigan-Noesi has worked alongside a multidisciplinary team of health providers in inpatient and outpatient mental health, community, medical, and academic settings. She has extensive training in pediatric psychology and adolescent health, as well as specialized training in adult and family interventions. Dr. Jernigan maintains a private practice serving a diverse clientele with a range of clinical concerns including, but not limited to: treatment of eating and weight concerns, mood disorders, anxiety, trauma, grief and loss, relational concerns, and career coaching. She also provides couple counseling focused on major life transitions such as, marriage and parenting. Her approach to therapy utilizes an intersectional framework emphasizing the role of identity (e.g., racial identity, sexual identity, gender identity) and culture in mental health and wellbeing.

    • Renee Johnson

      Renee Johnson
      @RENEE_M_JOHNSON

      Associate Professor,
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    • Dr. Renee M. Johnson is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned her MPH and PhD at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and conducted post-doctoral studies at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. At Hopkins, she is core faculty with the Center for Adolescent Health and the Center for Injury Research & Policy. Dr. Johnson has more than 100 publications addressing adolescent health, and is on the editorial board for JAMA Pediatrics. Her areas of expertise include: substance use among adolescents and emerging adults; violence and injury prevention; and evaluating the public health response to the overdose crisis. Much of her work addresses how adversity and social inequity shape behavioral health. She works with behavioral surveillance data (e.g., CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use & Health), as well as with morbidity and mortality data (e.g., State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System, or SUDORS). Dr. Johnson is deeply engaged in training the next generation of public health professionals. She teaches a course on substance use epidemiology and directs a NIDA-funded training program for doctoral and post-doctoral students studying the epidemiology of substance use.

    • Emily Mendenhall

      Emily Mendenhall
      @MENDENHALL_EM

      Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

    • Emily Mendenhall, PhD, MPH is a medical anthropologist and Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She has published widely at the boundaries of anthropology, psychology, medicine, and public health and is the inaugural co-editor-in-chief of Social Science and Medicine—Mental Health. Dr. Mendenhall led a Series of articles in on Syndemics in The Lancet in 2017, and was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology. She has published several books, including Rethinking Diabetes: Entanglements with Trauma, Poverty, and HIV (2019), Syndemic Suffering: Social Distress, Depression, and Diabetes among Mexican Immigrant Women (2012), and Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives (2015). Her newest book is Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji.

    • John Pamplin

      John Pamplin

      @JOHNPAMPLINII

      Assistant Professor
      and Faculty Fellow,
      New York
      University

    • John R. Pamplin II is an “Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow” in the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress and with the Center for Opioid Epidemiology and Policy at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Dr. Pamplin’s research studies the consequences of structural racism and systemic inequity on mental health and substance use outcomes. His program of research includes work identifying the social and structural drivers of racial patterns in DSM diagnosed major depression, as well as work evaluating policy interventions for the opioid crisis in terms of their potential to either alleviate of exacerbate racial inequities in overdose and criminal legal system outcomes. Prior to joining NYU, Dr. Pamplin received his PhD in Epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public health, where he was a predoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology’s National Institute of Mental Health-funded Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program. Upon graduation, Dr. Pamplin received the Bill Jenkins Award (formerly the William Farr Award) for commitment to addressing the causes of social inequalities in health and promise in the field of Epidemiology. Dr. Pamplin also holds an MPH in Epidemiology from Columbia University, as well as a BS in Biology from Morehouse College, and currently serves as President of the Student and Postdoc Committee of the Society for Epidemiologic Research.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I

What are some opportunities for public health practitioners to contribute to the prevention of trauma and its after-effects in the community?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific types of primary, secondary, and tertiary systemic or community-wide prevention strategies for trauma
  • Discuss the impact of racism, in terms of policies and practices, microaggressions, and other types of discriminatory behaviors, resulting in “racial trauma”
  • Describe the complicated relationship between traumatic brain injury and opioid use disorder
  • List 9 physical health conditions shown to be associated with experiencing trauma
  • Discuss the link between trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and cardiovascular disease in women

Moderator

  • Paula Schnurr

    Paula Schnurr
    @VA_PTSD_INFO

    MODERATOR Executive Director, National Center for PTSD and Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine

  • Subject Matter Experts

    • Rachel Sayko Adams

      Rachel Sayko Adams
      @RSAYKO_ADAMS

      Senior Scientist,
      Inst. for Behavioral Health, Heller School for Social Policy Management
      Brandeis University

    • Rachel Sayko Adams, PhD, MPH is a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health at the Heller School for Social Policy & Management at Brandeis University and a proud alum of Boston University’s School of Public Health where she completed her Master’s in Public Health. She is a health services researcher with expertise examining co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions following traumatic brain injury in military/Veteran and civilian populations, with a particular focus on at-risk alcohol use and prescription opioid use. Dr. Adams is the Co-PI of the INROADS study at Brandeis, Intersecting Research on Opioid Misuse, Addiction, and Disability Services, which is examining the intersection between addiction, disability, and service provision in an effort to address the rise of opioid use disorders among people with disabilities, funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. She is a MPI of an R01 from the National Institute of Mental Health which is integrating data from the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration to enhance suicide prevention efforts for military members returning from deployments using machine learning. Dr. Adams has an appointment as a health services researcher with the Veterans Health Administration Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center in Aurora, Colorado.

    • Jennifer Sumner

      Jennifer Sumner
      @SUMNERSTRESSLAB

      Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology,
      University of California, Los Angeles

    • Dr. Jennifer Sumner is a clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is the Director of the Sumner Stress Lab at UCLA, and her program of research lies at the intersection of the psychological and physical health consequences of trauma exposure. The work of the Sumner Stress Lab examines how experiences of trauma and severe stress relate to accelerated aging and risk for chronic disease, with a particular focus on cardiovascular disease—the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The goal of this research is to delineate the pathways by which trauma and severe stress get embedded under the skin to contribute to poor health and to use this information to develop targeted interventions to offset risk for adverse health outcomes after trauma. Dr. Sumner received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Pomona College and her Masters and PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship program at the Charleston Consortium (Traumatic Stress Track) and received postdoctoral training as an Epidemiology Merit Fellow at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Prior to joining UCLA, Dr. Sumner was an Assistant Professor of Behavioral Medicine at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Medical Center.

    • Juliette McClendon

      Juliette McClendon
      @WEAREBIGHEALTH

      Director of Medical
      Affairs,
      Big Health
    • Kathryn Magruder

      Kathryn Magruder
      @MUSCHEALTH

      Professor, Medical University of South Carolina


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Challenging Public Health: Rebecca Traister

How can anger about inequities be channeled into effective activism for social change?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, February 1st, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CPHRT.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Our Challenging Public Health series invites speakers from outside of public health to reflect on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This conversation features Rebecca Traister, writer at large for New York magazine and author of Good and Mad, All the Single Ladies, and Big Girls Don’t Cry discussing her perspectives on how public health can do better.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how inequitable social policies that influence the health of the public were highlighted in the pandemic
  • Discuss the role of journalists and how public health professionals can effectively interact with them in moving policies that shape public health
  • Discuss the role of state and federal politics in the future of public health

Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Rebecca Traister

      Rebecca Traister
      @RTRAISTER

      Writer at Large, New York Magazine
    • REBECCA TRAISTER is writer at large for New York magazine. A National Magazine Award winner, she has written about women in politics, media, and entertainment from a feminist perspective for The New Republic and Salon and has also contributed to The Nation, The New York Observer, The New York Times and The Washington Post. She is the author of Good and Mad and All the Single Ladies, both New York Times best-sellers, and the award-winning Big Girls Don’t Cry. She lives in New York with her family.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Children's Health

How can we improve the partnership of supporting individuals and organizations, including health care providers and community resources (e.g., schools, parks, libraries, childcare, public services, police, etc.) in addressing underlying causes of health problems among children and families? What is the role of public health practitioners in that partnership?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, December 13th, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.25 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNCH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic drastically affected children’s lives, changing how they receive education and limiting their social development. How has the pandemic changed how we view children’s health, and how can we learn from the experience? 

This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 mental/behavioral health symptoms experienced by children during the COVID-19 pandemic, and discuss implications for systems changes needed to address them
  • Discuss the patterns of negative health effects due to the pandemic on children due to economic and racial disparities
  • Describe the importance of an intersectionality approach to understanding and developing policy solutions to disparities in health effects on adults and children
  • Discuss the importance of addressing root causes of maternal and child health issues to optimize child health going forward
  • Describe the inequities in child care quality, access, and availability highlighted by the pandemic and the importance of addressing them in the “next normal”
  • Discuss how partnership with public libraries can improve child health
  • Describe future innovations to improve health care delivery highlighted by the pandemic

Subject Matter Experts

  • Kevin Churchwell

    Kevin Churchwell

    President and Chief Executive Officer, Boston Children's Hospital
  • Kevin B. Churchwell, MD, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Boston Children’s Hospital, providing leadership, vision, and oversight for a team that’s dedicated to improving and advancing child health through their life-changing work in clinical care, research and innovation, medical education, and community engagement. Since joining Boston Children’s as its Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Chief Operating Officer in 2013, Dr. Churchwell has been instrumental in leading the hospital’s work to become a High Reliability Organization, one where zero avoidable harm impacts any patient, family member, or employee. He has brought to Boston the same passion for enhancing the patient family experience that defined his tenure as CEO of both Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, and Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, part of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. An advocate for equity, diversity and inclusivity, Dr. Churchwell is responsible for establishing three of the 11 Offices of Health Equity and Inclusion at hospitals across the U.S. and Canada, including the Office at Boston Children’s, which he founded in 2016. With the publication of Boston Children’s own Declaration for Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity in 2020, Dr. Churchwell has committed to the work required to make Boston Children’s a community that’s made stronger by our differences, and a leader in equity for all. A graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, Dr. Churchwell completed his pediatric residency and a clinical fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care at Boston Children’s Hospital. He is currently an Associate Professor of Pediatric Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Dr. Churchwell is the Robert and Dana Smith Associate Professor of Anesthesia at the Harvard Medical School. Disclosures: Dr. Churchwell is a member of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, a board member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Whitehead Institute, Advisory Board for The Boston University School of Public Health, and the Boys and Girls Club of Boston.

  • Nancy Lopez

    Nancy López
    @UNM

    Professor, University of New Mexico

  • Dr. Nancy López is professor of sociology, University of New Mexico. Dr. López co-founded/directs the Institute for the Study of “Race” and Social Justice and she is the founding coordinator of the New Mexico Statewide Race, Gender, Class Data Policy Consortium (Visit: race.unm.edu). Dr. López currently serves as Associate VP for the Division of Equity & Inclusion. Her scholarship and teaching are guided by the insights of intersectionality–the simultaneity of tribal status/settler colonialism race/structural racism, gender/heteropatriarchy, class/capitalism, ethnicity/nativism, sexuality/heterosexism as systems of oppression/resistance across a variety of social outcomes (education, health, employment, wealth and housing) and the importance of developing contextualized community-driven solutions that advance justice. Dr. López has been recognized for her contributions to engaged scholarship through the American Sociological Association William Foote Whyte Distinguished Career Award for Sociological Practice and Public Sociology. Dr. López has received funding from the National Institutes of Health that resulted in an edited volume, Mapping ”Race”: Critical Approaches for Health Disparities researchers where she talks about “pregnant while Black” and the racialized gendered social determinants of health. She is also coined the term “street race” as a measure of race the myth or race as biology, genetic ancestry or culture and instead focuses on race as social relationship of power that is not just about your personal identity (See conversation.com essay entitled the Census Bureau Keeps Confusing Race and Ethnicity and publications in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity and Critical Public Health Journals). Her current research funded by the WT Grant Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation includes a mixed method study in three research practice partnerships that examines the role of ethnic studies curriculum and culturally relevant pedagogy in reducing complex intersectional inequalities in high school (Albuquerque, San Francisco and Los Angeles. She has served on over 75 PhD/MA committees and she given over 130 seminars on at national conferences, invited lectures and community gatherings. She a Black Latina, the New York City-born daughter of Dominican immigrants parents who didn’t have an opportunity to go beyond a second grade education but were rich in funds of knowledge and cultural wealth. She grew up in public housing and graduated from a de facto segregated public high school. Spanish is Dr. López’s first language; she participated in Head Start and Upward Bound both federally funded programs designed to equity lifts for those who have historically been excluded from educational opportunities.

  • Rasheed Malik

    Rasheed Malik
    @RAMSKULL
    Director, Early Childhood Policy, Center for American Progress

  • Rasheed A. Malik is the associate director of research for Early Childhood Policy at American Progress. His work focuses on child care infrastructure and supply, the economic benefits of child care, and bias and discrimination in early childhood policy. Malik’s research has been featured in or cited by The New York Times, Vox, The Washington Post, NPR, Slate, CNNBusiness, and CNBC, among others. Prior to joining American Progress, Malik was a government affairs and communications associate for the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance, an organization with the goal of making the New York Harbor a shared, resilient, and accessible resource for all New Yorkers. Malik holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in public affairs from Baruch College. He lives in Northern Virginia with his wife and two young children.

  • Betsy McKay

    Betsy McKay
    @BETSWRITES

    MODERATOR Senior Writer, Wall Street Journal

  • Betsy McKay is a senior writer for The Wall Street Journal covering U.S. and global public health. She is a member of a team of Journal reporters awarded the 1999 Pulitzer Prize in the international reporting category for in-depth analytical coverage of the Russian financial crisis. She has won awards for stories on the rising threat of drug-resistant tuberculosis and a growing crisis with maternity care in the rural U.S.

  • Terrinieka Powell

    Terrinieka W. Powell
    @DRTERRIPOWELL

    PhD Associate Professor
    & Vice Chair of Inclusion, Diversity, Anti-Racism
    and Equity,
    John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Terrinieka W. Powell, PhD, is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Inclusion, Diversity, Anti-Racism and Equity in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). After earning her BA in Psychology from Williams College, she earned her MA and PhD from DePaul University in Community Psychology. She spent two years as a Kellogg Health Scholars Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan School of Public Health before joining the faculty JHSPH. She has expertise in adolescent health, qualitative methods, intervention development and implementation science. Her research activities, publications and funding history all demonstrate her commitment to improving the lives of vulnerable young people. Dr. Powell leads the B Lab, a Baltimore-based research team helping to create a world where all youth are safe, healthy, hopeful and connected. Partnerships with churches, schools, libraries, families, and community-based organizations are a cornerstone of her research. She has collaborated with institutions across several states to prevent substance use and sexual risk-taking among young people. With partners, she creates interventions that are sustainable and take into account the social context of the environments. Most recently, she led the development of the Better Together (BT) intervention, an age-appropriate, culturally relevant 8-session library-based intervention designed to prevent early substance use among Black youth affected by parental drug use. Her goal is to ensure that youth, especially those affected by trauma, have multiple pathways to achieve optimal health.

  • Rachel Garfield

    Rachel Garfield
    @RACHELLGARFIELD
    VP/Associate Director for Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, VP/Co-Director for the Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, Kaiser Family Foundation

  • Rachel Garfield is Vice President at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Co-Director for its Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured. She has 20 years of experience in Medicaid policy research and is an expert in data analysis on insurance coverage and access to care for the low-income population. She also has conducted work in public financing for behavioral health services for low-income populations. Prior to joining KFF, Dr. Garfield was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health; she has also held positions as a policy analyst in Medicaid/CHIP policy and research consultant for hospital operations and management. Dr. Garfield has a BA from Harvard College, holds an M.H.S. in health policy from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and received her PhD in health policy from Harvard University.

  • Michael Lu

    Michael Lu
    @UCBERKELEYSPH
    Dean, University of California Berkeley School of Public Health

  • Dr. Lu possesses decades of expertise in maternal and child health policy. He is currently dean of the school of public health at the University of California, Berkeley, and previously a senior associate dean at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Lu served as director of the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau under the Obama Administration. During his tenure, he transformed key federal programs in maternal and child health, and launched major initiatives to reduce maternal, infant, and child mortality across the nation. He oversaw the launch and expansion of the federal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program. For his leadership, he was awarded the prestigious U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Hubert H. Humphrey Service to America Award in 2013. Prior to his public service, Lu was a professor of obstetrics-gynecology and public health at UCLA, where his research focused on racial-ethnic disparities in birth outcomes from a life-course perspective. He co-directed the residency program in obstetrics and gynecology and a training grant in maternal and child health, and received several prestigious awards for his teaching. As a practicing obstetrician for nearly two decades, he has attended more than 1000 births, and has been voted one of the Best Doctors in America since 2005. Lu has served on three National Academy of Medicine Committees, and co-authored the recently released report Vibrant and Healthy Kids: Aligning Science, Practice, and Policy to Advance Health Equity. Lu received his bachelor’s degrees in political science and human biology from Stanford University, master’s degrees in health and medical sciences and public health from UC Berkeley, medical degree from UC San Francisco, and residency training in obstetrics and gynecology from UC Irvine.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Hospitals and Healthcare

How can individuals be empowered and motivated to participate in optimizing their own health? What can be the role of public health practitioners?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, December 2nd, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.25 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_NNHH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • CompetenciesCommunity Partnership Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Domestically and globally, healthcare systems were overwhelmed by the COVID-19 pandemic. What have we learned from the pandemic about how care is delivered and how our systems can be improved to better deliver efficient and high-quality care? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe factors that influence the variability in charges for services across hospitals
  • Describe major short-term and long-term consequences of COVID on hospitals and patients
  • Explain concept of “coproducing” health (empowering people to engage with their own health) - and lessons learned from COVID experience that may promote it
  • Discuss the role of community health centers, the impact of COVID on them, and challenges to adapting going forward


Moderator

  • Reed Abelson

    Reed Abelson
    @REEDABELSON

    Reporter, The New York Times

  • Reed Abelson has been a reporter for The New York Times since 1995. She currently covers the business of health care, focusing on health insurance and how financial incentives affect the delivery of medical care. She witnessed the Affordable Care Act become law and is actively keeping an eye on what happens next. Before she began covering health care in 2002, Ms. Abelson covered a broad range of topics, from the collapse of Enron to the oversight of charitable organizations to accounting to personal investing. Before joining The Times, Ms. Abelson was a staff writer for Smart Money from 1993 to 1995, where she wrote in-depth investing features. From 1990 to 1993, she was a reporter for Forbes, where she profiled public and private companies. She began her journalism career as a reporter at the Philadelphia Business Journal, where she covered health care, venture capital, technology and the ports of Philadelphia. She graduated cum laude from Bryn Mawr College in 1983 with an A.B. in English literature, and she earned an M.A. in English literature from Columbia University in 1984.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Ge Bai

      Ge Bai
      @GEBAIDC

      Associate Professor of Practice, John Hopkins Carey Business School
    • Ge Bai, PhD, CPA is an Associate Professor of Accounting at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and an Associate Professor of Health Policy & Management (joint) at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has received the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association’s Excellence in Teaching Award. An expert on health care pricing, policy, and management, Dr. Bai has testified before House Ways and Means Committee, written for the Wall Street Journal, and published her studies in leading academic journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Health Affairs. Her work has been widely featured in ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox News, Los Angeles Times, NBC, New York Times, NPR, PBS, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media outlets and used in government regulations and congressional testimonies.

    • Jerome Dugan

      Jerome Dugan
      @PROFDUGAN

      Assistant Professor, University of Washington

    • Jerome Dugan is an Assistant Professor of Health Services and the Leo Greenawalt Endowed Professor of Health Policy in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington (UW) and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at UW. He is also the co-director of the Program in Health Economics and Outcomes Research Methodologies (PHEnOM), a joint program between the School of Public Health and the School of Pharmacy at UW. Dr. Dugan has expertise in modeling the financial and policy impacts of social and medical service interventions, evaluating the efficacy of cost containment strategies employed by payers and providers, and examining the structure and regulation of healthcare markets. In particular, his research focuses on the prevention and control of major chronic diseases – such as cardiovascular disease and mental health disorders – diagnoses that require a high level of coordination between individual patients, treating institutions, and insurers to minimize the probability of future acute events. Dr. Dugan holds an MA and PhD in Economics from Rice University and a BS in Economics from Clemson University. In addition to his academic appointments, he serves as a member of the Center for Health Innovation and Policy Science (CHIPS), the Health Economics Committee at the Washington Health Alliance, and the Health Care Cost Transparency Board’s Advisory Committee on Data Issues in Washington State.

    • Vivian Lee

      Vivian Lee
      @VIVIANLEEMD

      President of Health Platforms, Verily Life Sciences

    • Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is the author of The Long Fix: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis with Strategies that Work for Everyone (Norton). She is President of Health Platforms at Verily Life Sciences. A physician and health care executive, Lee also serves as a senior lecturer at Harvard Medical School. Prior to joining Verily, Lee served as the Dean of the Medical School and CEO of the University of Utah Health Care, an integrated health system with a budget of $3.6 billion, including a 1400 member physician group and health insurance plan. During her tenure, she led University of Utah Health to recognition for its health care delivery system innovations that enable higher quality at lower costs and with higher patient satisfaction, and superior financial performance. In 2016, University of Utah was ranked first among all university hospitals in quality and safety (Vizient). Dr. Lee previously was the inaugural Chief Scientific Officer of New York University’s Langone Medical Center. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine with over 200 peer-reviewed publications, Lee serves on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Fund, the Board of Trustees of Boston Children’s Hospital, and is also a director on the board of Zions Bancorporation, a publicly traded company. Dr. Lee is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard, received a D.Phil in medical engineering from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, earned her M.D. with honors from Harvard Medical School, and her MBA from NYU. She was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 50 Most Influential Clinical Executives in 2020.

    • Peter Shin

      Peter Shin
      @PETERSHINGW

      Associate Professor, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health

    • Peter Shin, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at the George Washington University and Gibson Program in Community Health Policy and RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Director. Dr. Shin focuses on the study of community health systems and integration of care for vulnerable populations and is author of over 100 health policy reports and articles on community health centers, the health care safety net, medically underserved populations, health care financing, social determinants and health information technology. His research focuses on identifying innovative payment and health care delivery models, exploring population health initiatives, and assessing impacts of policy change. Dr. Shin teaches courses in analytic methods and public health leadership and is an expert in the management and analysis of data, regulatory and policy analysis, community-based participatory research, and qualitative and quantitative evaluations and has provided technical assistance to federal and state agencies. Dr. Shin received his doctorate in public policy and MPH from the George Washington University and his BA in Biology from Oberlin College.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Moving the Needle on the Social Determinants of Health


What are specific actions that can be taken at the local level that will address social determinants of public health in terms of education, criminal justice, family support, economic equality, and other areas? How can public health officials actively support those policies and initiatives?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, November 9th, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MNSDH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Coincident with recent reports published by the Rockefeller-Boston University 3-D Commission and by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, join global experts for a discussion on leading-edge science on social determinants of health—and where we are headed from here. Cohosted with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 3 themes shared by two recent reports (Rockefeller-Boston University 3-D Commission and Robert Woods Johnson Foundation) on using data to improve public health through understanding social determinants.
  • List 3 key actions necessary to advance the recommendations of both reports areas in terms of educating the public health workforce and the general public
  • Describe the types of data that can lead to action
  • Discuss how COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted problems in health data infrastructure


Subject Matter Experts

  • Gail Christopher

    Gail Christopher
    @DRGCCHRISTOPHER

    Executive Director, National Collaborative
    for Health
    Equity
  • Dr. Gail Christopher is an award-winning social change agent with expertise in the social determinants of health and well-being and in related public policies. She is known for her pioneering work to infuse holistic health and diversity concepts into public sector programs and policy discourse. In her role as the Senior Advisor and Vice President at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), she was the driving force behind the America Healing initiative and the Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation effort. Dr. Christopher also served as Kellogg’s Vice President for Program. In 2015 she received the Terrance Keenan Award from Grantmakers in Health. She chairs the Board of the Trust for America’s Health. In 2019, Dr. Christopher became the Executive Director of the National Collaborative for Health Equity (NCHE).

  • Laura Magana

    Laura Magaña
    @LAURAMAGVALL

    President and CEO Association of Schools
    and Programs of
    Public Health

  • Dr. Laura Magaña joined the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) as President and CEO in August 2017. Under Dr. Magaña’s leadership, ASPPH has continued to advance its mission to strengthen the capacity of members by advancing leadership, excellence, and collaboration for academic public health. During her tenure, ASPPH has significantly grown its global engagement, established an academy for teaching excellence, launched the academic public health leadership institute and enhanced the voice of academic public health through advocacy efforts. Prior to joining ASPPH, Dr. Magaña dedicated more than 35 years to successfully leading the transformation and advancements of public and private universities in Mexico; educational organizations in the USA; United Nations programs; and NGO’s in Central America and Europe. She was most recently the dean of the School of Public Health in Mexico at the ASPPH-member National Institute of Public Health (INSP). Her diverse portfolio features academic publications, educational technological developments many of which relate to learning environments, the use of technology in education, and public health education. She has also been a faculty member and lecturer in diverse universities around the world.

  • Alonzo Plough

    Alonzo Plough
    @ALONZOPLOUGH

    Vice President, Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

  • Alonzo Plough joined the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as chief science officer and vice president, Research-Evaluation-Learning in January 2014. He is responsible for aligning all of the Foundation’s work with the best evidence from research and practice and incorporating program evaluations into organizational learning. He also oversees the two grantmaking portfolios focused on innovation and emerging issues: Pioneer and Global Ideas for U.S. solutions. Plough has been a national leader in public health practice for over 25 years. He came to the Foundation from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where he served as director of emergency preparedness and response from 2009–2013. In that role, he was responsible for the leadership and management of activities protecting the 10 million residents of Los Angeles County from natural disasters and threats related to disease outbreaks and other public health emergencies. He coordinated activities in emergency operations, infectious disease control, risk communication, planning, and community engagement. Prior to this position, Plough served as vice president of strategy, planning and evaluation for The California Endowment from 2005–2009. Before this, he served 10 years as director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health and previously served as director of public health in Boston for eight years. Plough earned his PhD and MA at Cornell University, and his MPH at Yale University School of Medicine’s Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He has held academic appointments at Harvard University School of Public Health, Tufts University Department of Community Medicine, and Boston University School of Management. He is currently clinical professor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. He has been the recipient of numerous awards for public service and leadership and is the author of an extensive body of scholarly articles, books, and book chapters. Plough lives in Princeton and Los Angeles, and is married with two adult sons and two granddaughters. He is a jazz guitarist and vocalist.

  • Rhitu Chatterjee

    Rhitu Chatterjee
    @RHITUC

    MODERATOR
    Health Correspondent,

    NPR

  • Rhitu Chatterjee is a science and health correspondent with National Public Radio. She covers mental health and occasionally other science and health stories. Before starting this position, she was an editor with NPR’s popular blog, The Salt. She edited and reported a range of stories through the lens of food. Prior to coming to NPR in 2016, Rhitu was a New Delhi based multimedia journalist, specializing in global health, development, science and environmental reporting. She also covered gender issues, especially gender violence as well as women and children’s health, as a contributing correspondent with The World, a one-hour public radio program, co-produced by the BBC World Service, Public Radio International and WGBH radio in Boston, as well as with Science magazine. Her work has appeared on popular NPR blogs, like The Salt, Goats & Soda and Shots, and on the radio on shows like NPR’s like Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her work has also appeared on the BBC World Service’s website and radio show, Boston Calling. Rhitu is also a former science correspondent at PRI’s The World. Her work has been nominated twice for the South Asian Journalism Association’s journalism awards and has been recognized by Gabriel Awards.

  • Eric Goosby

    Eric Goosby
    @DRERICGOOSBY

    Professor of Medicine and Director of Global Health Delivery and Diplomacy, Institute for Global Health Sciences, UC San Francisco

  • Eric Goosby, M.D., is an internationally recognized expert on infectious diseases, with a specialty in HIV/AIDS clinical care, research, and policy. During the Clinton Administration, Dr. Goosby was the founding director of the Ryan White CARE Act, the largest federally funded HIV/AIDS program in the U.S. He went on to become the interim director of the White House’s Office of National AIDS Policy. In the Obama Administration, Dr. Goosby was appointed Ambassador-at-Large and implemented the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which significantly expanded under his tenure life-saving HIV treatment to millions in Sub Saharan Africa, SE Asia, and Eastern Europe. After serving as the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, he was appointed by the UN Secretary-General as the Special Envoy on Tuberculosis, where he focused on the first-ever UN High-Level Meeting on TB in 2019. He is currently a Professor of Medicine at the UCSF School of Medicine and leading the Center for Global Health Delivery, Diplomacy and Economics, Institute for Global Health Sciences. Additionally, he is a member of the Biden Covid-19 Advisory Board, a member of the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, and serves on the San Francisco Dept. of Public Health, Policy Group for the COVID-19 Response.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Mental Health


Stigmatization is a major issue that underlies the high prevalence and inadequacy of treatment of mental health problems. In addition, research has identified social isolation as one of the major contributors to mental health problems. How can public health practitioners contribute to the destigmatization of mental health problems and to decreasing social isolation through programs and policies that promote human connection and support in their communities?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, November 16th, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNMH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic was coupled with an increase in poor mental health and substance use worldwide. How will we address mental health moving forward given what we learned during the pandemic? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss mental health as a public health problem in the US, even prior to COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Describe sources of psychologic distress during the pandemic and resulting effects on mental health problems in particularly affected populations
  • Discuss the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of Black Americans and persons with disabilities and strategies to address it going forward
  • Discuss systems-level barriers to accessing mental health services that must be addressed
  • Identify 4 specific actions that can be taken to improve the “next normal” in public mental health"


Moderator

  • Deborah Becker

    Lynn Jolicoeur
    @LMJOLICOEUR

    Producer and Reporter, WBUR

  • Lynn Jolicoeur is a senior field producer, reporter and editor at WBUR. As field producer, she researches and writes host interview segments and feature stories on a vast array of topics for the signature early-evening news program, All Things Considered. Lynn also reports for the station’s local broadcasts (with some stories airing nationally on NPR, as well). She has developed beats covering mental health and homelessness, and most recently she’s reported on the pandemic’s impact on both. Lynn is particularly passionate about reporting on the issue of suicide. In 2015 she produced and reported a 15-part, yearlong series on the suicide crisis. She has reported in depth on efforts to end chronic homelessness and weaknesses in the system for sheltering and housing adults experiencing homelessness. Prior to working at WBUR, Lynn was a television reporter for 18 years – most recently at Boston’s WCVB-TV Channel 5. She covered areas from crime and the justice system to politics, medicine, and social issues.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • M. Daniele Fallin

      M. Daniele Fallin
      @FALLINDANI

      Chair, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    • M. Daniele Fallin, PhD, studies how environments, behaviors, genetic variation, and epigenetic variation contribute to risk for psychiatric disease, with a focus on autism.

    • Briana Mezuk

      Briana Mezuk
      @UMICHSPH

      Director, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan

    • Dr. Mezuk is the Director of the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health and is an Associate Chair in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She is a psychiatric epidemiologist whose research focuses on understanding the intersections of mental and physical health. Much of her work has examined the consequences of depression for medical morbidity and functioning in mid- and late-life, with particular attention to metabolic diseases such as diabetes and frailty. She is also the Director of the Michigan Integrative Well-Being and Inequalities (MIWI) Training Program, a NIH-funded methods training program that supports innovative, interdisciplinary research on the interrelationships between mental and physical health as they relate to health disparities. She is committed to translating research into practice, and since 2013 has collaborated with partners at the YMCA on evaluating and augmenting their diabetes self-management programming to incorporate psychosocial aspects of health. Finally, she writes a blog for Psychology Today called “Ask an Epidemiologist."

    • Courtney Thomas Tobin

      Courtney Thomas Tobin
      @DRTHOMASTOBIN

      Assistant Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health

    • Dr. Thomas Tobin is trained as a medical sociologist and use mixed-method and transdisciplinary approaches to examine psychosocial sources of risk and resilience and their impact on the psychophysiological health of Black Americans across the life course. Summary of Research: A central focus of Dr. Thomas Tobin’s research is the conceptualization and assessment of race-based stress and coping experiences among the U.S. Black population. In one study, Dr. Thomas Tobin found that experiencing subtle or ambiguous discrimination increases Blacks’ risk of poor psychological and physiological functioning and may be more detrimental than more blatant discriminatory treatment. This work motivated the development of Dr. Thomas Tobin’s “Racial Self-Awareness Framework of Race-Based Stress, Coping, and Health,” which clarifies environmental, sociocultural, and behavioral health processes by spotlighting “racial self-awareness” (RSA), the heightened sense of awareness of one’s racial minority status within a majority context. Results from a recent qualitative study suggest that (1) RSA represents additional cognitive effort that is physically and emotionally taxing, (2) RSA shapes Blacks’ perceptions of and responses to general and race-based stressors, and (3) Blacks employ a range of behavioral coping strategies to reduce the strain of RSA.

    • Katie Wang

      Katie Wang
      @YALESPH

      Assistant Professor,
      Yale School of
      Public Health

    • Dr. Wang’s research broadly focuses on the role of stigma as a psychosocial determinant of mental and behavioral health disparities among diverse marginalized populations. She received a K01 mentored scientist career development award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to investigate the associations among mental illness stigma, emotion dysfunction (i.e., intense, prolonged negative affect and/or difficulties in regulating one’s emotions), and substance use among adults with depression. Some methodological approaches utilized to accomplish this research include psychophysiological assessments (e.g., heart rate variability, salivary cortisol) and ecological momentary assessment (e.g., daily diaries). Dr. Wang is also involved in a number of projects that examines the health inequities facing people with disabilities, including a mixed-method study on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the disability community.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

How does compassionate leadership benefit not only the organization and individual employees, but the leaders themselves?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 7th, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_DBL
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Donato Tramuto’s new book, The Double Bottom Line: How Compassionate Leaders Captivate Hearts and Deliver Results explores the importance of compassion as the leading force to advance the well-being of a business and its people. Tramuto defines a new model of leadership, identifies the secrets of successful leaders who win hearts and deliver results, and examines how to cultivate more compassionate people.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Define compassionate leadership
  • Identify the two most important ingredients in practicing compassionate leadership
  • Provide examples of the value of compassionate leadership in businesses and institutions in building the bottom line
  • Discuss the importance of storytelling and “storylistening” in meaningful connection within an organization and with the external world
  • Describe lessons learned from the pandemic in working in and leading an organization

Subject Matter Experts

  • Donato Tramuto

    Donato Tramuto

    @DONATOTRAMUTO

    Founder of the
    Tramuto Foundation
    and Health
    eVillages
  • Donato J. Tramuto is the author of THE DOUBLE BOTTOM LINE: How Compassionate Leaders Captivate Hearts and Deliver Results (Fast Company Press, Jan 2022). He is a global health activist, former CEO of Tivity Health, and founder of the Tramuto Foundation and Health eVillages. He has nearly four decades of business leadership experience and is most notable for his ability to balance transactional and transformational leadership within organizations. He has launched two successful start-ups, successfully lead the turnaround of a public healthcare company, and has executed innovative programs leading to sustainable business results through his Compassionate Leadership approach. Tramuto was the recipient of the prestigious Robert F. Kennedy Ripple of Hope Award in 2014 and the 2017 Robert F. Kennedy Embracing His Legacy Award. The New York Times has recognized Tramuto as “a global health activist.” His first book, LIFE’S BULLDOZER MOMENTS: How Adversity Leads to Success in Life and Business, was published in 2016.

  • Maria Bustos

    Maria Bustos (SPH '18)

    MODERATOR, Regional Market Access Manager, Neuroscience LATAM, The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson

  • Maria Camila Bustos MD MPH, a BUSPH’18 graduate with concentrations in Healthcare Management and Pharmaceuticals, was the first recipient of a Tramuto Foundation Scholarship for International Students in 2017. After graduation, Maria returned to Bogotá Colombia working initially as an independent consultant for health economics studies on efficient resource management for high-cost diseases in the country and capacity building on public health policy. Soon after, she joined the pharmaceutical industry in market access roles generating evidence-based communication and strategies to make novel treatments accessible. Always with a public health lens and a collaborative spirit in all her endeavors to create a positive impact on the social aspects of health, in her recent years as Value & Access Manager for Amgen Colombia, Maria led public-private value-based partnerships across the country to improve quality care and the patient experience in oncology, hematology and bone health with a focus on the elderly. Today Maria works for Janssen, as Regional Market Access Manager for Neuroscience in LATAM, based in Bogotá. Her current challenge is achieving access to new therapies for neurodegeneration and mental health disorders in Latin America. A region of constrained budgets and widespread social inequities, where compassionate leadership will be needed to shape a stronger commitment of health systems to these pressing issues.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Civil Liberties and Health

How can public health practitioners communicate effectively with communities about emerging science, to identify the trade-offs between individual civil liberties and health of the public, and engage in strategies that encourage communities to embrace the importance of working together to protect each other?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 21st 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_NNCLH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills, Policy Development and Program Planning Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Many conversations surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic were framed as a trade-off between individual liberties and the health of the public. Was this the right framing? 

What are the implications of the moment for future conversations? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 specific ethical questions related to civil liberties posed by mandates (e.g., masks, vaccination) in response to the pandemic
  • Discuss challenges and opportunities COVID-19 exposed in American bioethics
  • Describe how systemic racial discrimination was highlighted and exacerbated by the COVID pandemic
  • Discuss the relationship of social injustice and health inequities and the importance of focusing on avenues to address underlying injustices in future social and legal policies


Subject Matter Experts

  • Nancy Berlinger

    Nancy Berlinger
    @HASTINGSCENTER

    Research Scholar,
    The Hastings
    Center
  • Nancy Berlinger is a Research Scholar at The Hastings Center, an independent bioethics research institute based in Garrison, NY. Her current research focuses on ethical and societal challenges arising from population aging; the bioethics of migration, and responding to and learning from the Covid-19 pandemic. She has longstanding research interests in decision-making and care in serious illness and near the end of life; the management of problems of safety and harm in health systems, and the moral dimensions of care work. She directs The Hastings Center’s Visiting Scholar Program, including the Sadler Scholars Program for doctoral students from underrepresented communities, here. Highlights of current and recent work: Bioethics for aging societies: Since 2016, Berlinger has overseen the development of research projects and public-facing work exploring the consequences of population aging, with close attention to what it means to flourish in late life, how to support experiences such as living with dementia, and how to apply concepts and data from housing-focused research and policy analysis to conceptualizing aging in community.

  • Colleen Flood

    Colleen Flood
    @COLLEENFLOOD2

    Professor and University Research Chair,
    University of Ottawa

  • Colleen M. Flood is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and University Research Chair in Health Law & Policy. In addition, she serves as the inaugural director of the university’s Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics. From 2006-2011, she was also a Scientific Director of the Institute for Health Services and Policy Research, one of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Professor Flood has pushed the boundaries of health law beyond its traditional focus to illuminate law’s role in the broad web of relationships within health systems. Her comparative research has brought new insights and knowledge to Canadian and global debates over privatization, health system design and governance, and the role of courts in defending rights in health care. She is the author/editor of 10 books (two of which are in multiple editions) and publishes broadly in academic journals and for the popular press. Her two most recent books are: The Right to Health at the Public/Private Divide (co-edited with Aeyal Gross, 2014) and Law & Mind: Mental Health Law and Policy in Canada (co-edited with Jennifer Chandler, 2016). You can read some of her work at: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=333684 In addition to her extensive research program, Professor Flood also contributes to various committee activities. From 2012 to 2016, she served on the governance board of the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. She is currently on the board of Associated Medical Services and a member of the Corporation of Massey College. Professor Flood has received several honours and distinctions for her work. Most recently, she was elected as a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2013, she was appointed an honorary member of the College of Family Physicians of Ontario. Colleen M. Flood holds degrees from the University of Auckland and the University of Toronto.

  • Chantal Da Silva

    Chantal Da Silva
    @CHANTALADASILVA

    MODERATOR
    Freelance journalist working for NBC News

  • Chantal Da Silva is a freelance journalist working for NBC News. Her work has been featured by Newsweek, where she previously served as chief correspondent, as well as by CNN, The Independent, Forbes, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, The Guardian and others. Affiliation and title: Freelance journalist working for NBC News.

  • Ruqaiijah Yearby

    Ruqaiijah Yearby
    @RUQAIIJAH

    Professor of Law and Executive Director and CO- Founder, Institute for Healing Justice and Equity, Saint Louis University

  • Ruqaiijah Yearby, J.D., M.P.H is a full professor and member of the Center for Health Law Studies at Saint Louis University School of Law. She is also co-founder and Executive Director of Saint Louis University’s Institute for Healing Justice and Equity and Co-Principal Investigator for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant entitled, “Are Cities and Counties Ready to Use Racial Equity Tools to Influence Policy?”. Additionally, she has served as an Instructor for the Harvard Medical School, Center for Bioethics. Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby is an expert in racial health disparities, who advocates for equal access to quality health care and fair wages for racial and ethnic minorities, women, and the poor. Recently, Professor Yearby authored Protecting Workers that Provide Essential Services and co-authored Racism is a Public Health Crisis. Here’s How to Respond, which was used to support the passage of Connecticut House Bill No. 6662, that declares racism as a public health crisis as well as cited in the American Psychological Association Resolution to Combat Racism and in the 2020 Health Equity report for Boone County, MO. Her work has been published in the American Journal of Bioethics, Health Affairs, and the Oxford Journal of Law and the Biosciences and used in law, medical school, and social science classes at schools such as Harvard, NYU, Fordham, and the University of California Berkeley.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars