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Courses with keyword "DEI and Race"

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 17, 2022, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_EVTANE.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Communication Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The health of populations is shaped by politics and policies that create the world around us. Elections have real consequences for public health, making voting a central pillar of our community efforts towards creating a better, healthier world. America is Calling. Vote! is an effort to encourage voters under 35 to vote in the upcoming midterm elections. Join us for a conversation between BUSPH Board Member John Rosenthal and March for Our Lives leader David Hogg on the importance of voting and the responsibility of public health to promote voter engagement.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the mission and importance of the effort, America is Calling. Vote!
  • Discuss the impact that young voters can have on democracy and freedom in the U.S.
  • Discuss the correlation between voter turnout and positive change in past elections.
  • Recommend strategies for discussing politics with people who have opposing views.


Moderator

  • Craig Andrade

    Craig Andrade
    @DRCRAIGANDRADE
    Associate Dean for Practice, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Craig Andrade is Associate Dean of Practice and Director of the Activist Lab at Boston University’s School of Public Health (SPH) where he is serves to catalyze and encourage SPH’s public health practice portfolio locally and globally among all members of the school community, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community partners. He is also a member of the Dean’s Cabinet and the Governing Council and chairs the school’s permanent practice committee. Previously Dr. Andrade was the Director of the Bureau of Family Health & Nutrition (BFHN) at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH). BFHN’s programs include Early Intervention (EI), Pregnancy, Infancy and Early Childhood, Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program, Home Visiting, Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, Breastfeeding Initiative, Birth Defects Surveillance, Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program, the Office of Data Translation and Birth Defects Research and Prevention. He also served as Director of the Division of Health Access at DPH, helped found the Racial Equity Leadership Team and Cross-Department Racial Equity Collaborative at DPH and was Associate Dean of Health and Wellness and Director of Student Health Services at Wheaton College in Norton, MA. He served as critical care, public health and ward nurse at Boston Medical Center; nurse manager and head athletic trainer at Buckingham Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, MA; and was owner/operator of Active Health, a private health and fitness company. Craig is a registered nurse, athletic trainer, licensed massage therapist and strength and condition specialist with masters and doctoral degrees in public health from Boston University. His research interests include behavioral risk management and resilience-building among children, adolescents and young adults.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • John Rosenthal

      John Rosenthal
      @JOHNROSENTHAL_
      Founder, Stop Handgun Violence; President, Meredith Management


    • John Rosenthal is the President of Meredith Management. He is a successful real estate developer and manager in Massachusetts who has distinguished himself in his ability to balance corporate and individual responsibility. John is also very active in community based environmental and renewable energy issues as well as social and economic justice. He has organized and advocated extensively in support of safe and renewable energy and against nuclear power and weapons. In February 2022, John partnered with world renowned branding and creative designer, Bruce Mau, and the Massive Change Network to create the America is Calling – VOTE! initiative to rebrand democracy and freedom in America by countering the voter suppression efforts and motivating Americans to vote to help save Democracy.

    • David Hogg

      David Hogg
      @DAVIDHOGG11

      Co-founder,
      March for our Lives


    • Thrust into the world of activism by the largest school shooting in American history, Parkland survivor David Hogg has become one of the most compelling voices of his generation. His call to “get over politics and get something done” challenges Americans to stand up, speak out and work to elect morally just leaders, regardless of party affiliation. Passionate in his advocacy to end gun violence, David’s mission of increasing voter participation, civic engagement and activism embraces a range of issues.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 24, 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CHMPHA.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Approximately 4 million women give birth each year in the U.S. Yet, traditional public health approaches have continued to consider maternal and child health together. How do we put the needs of mothers at the heart of public health? And how do we ensure attention to the health of all persons who give birth?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the limited reproductive choices that black women, women of color, and immigrant women have due to structural racism.
  • Define reproductive justice and discuss the right of all people to have or not have children under safe conditions.
  • Discuss the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare for achieving reproductive autonomy.
  • Analyze the role popular visual culture has in depicting the fetus and the pregnant body.
  • Assess the maternal mental health difficulties during the perinatal period and identify the impacts this has on fetal health.
  • Discuss how campaigns and interventions used in the UK can be applied to the U.S. to improve maternal mental health outcomes.


Moderator

  • Priyanka Dayal McCluskey

    Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
    @PRIYANKA_DAYAL
    Senior Health Reporter, WBUR

  • Priyanka Dayal McCluskey is a senior health reporter for WBUR, Boston’s NPR news station. Her work airs on the radio and appears online at WBUR.org. Before joining WBUR in 2022, she spent eight years as a health care reporter at The Boston Globe. She previously covered health and medicine at the Boston Herald. She began her career writing local news for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. Priyanka’s coverage spans health business and policy, medical research, and health disparities. She is focused on how the health care system serves — and doesn’t serve — patients. Her recent work chronicles the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients, workers, and the health care system. She is a co-author of WBUR’s CommonHealth newsletter. Priyanka has a B.S. in Journalism and a B.A. in Political Science from Boston University.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Marcela Howell

      Marcela Howell
      @BLACKWOMENSRJ
      President; CEO, In Our Own Voice: National Black Women's Reproductive Justice Agenda


    • Marcela Howell is the president & CEO of In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda, a national-state partnership with eight Black women’s Reproductive Justice organizations with a goal of lifting up the voices of Black leaders on reproductive rights, health and justice. An advocate and policy strategist, Marcela is recognized for her expertise in strategic communications, leadership development and policy forecasting. With over 40 years of experience advocating for reproductive justice and women’s empowerment, she is devoted to enhancing the role of Black women in national policy debates on issues that impact their lives. Marcela has testified before Congress on abortion access, reproductive rights and justice and the empowerment of Black women and has been quoted in numerous publications, including Newsweek, Washington Post, Ms. Magazine, Blavity, and Essence Magazine. Marcela is the author of Walk in My Shoes: A Black Activist’s Guide to Surviving the Women’s Movement, a collection of inspirational essays to help young Black women navigate the women’s movement and empower them to become leaders in the fight for reproductive justice.

    • May Sudhinaraset

      May Sudhinaraset
      @UCLAFSPH
      Associate Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health


    • Dr. May Sudhinaraset, PhD is an Associate Professor in Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at UCLA. She is trained as a social epidemiologist from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on understanding the social determinants of migrant, adolescent, and women’s health both globally and in the US. Her work centers around three complementary streams of work: (1) social and cultural contexts of vulnerable adolescents and women; (2) global women’s health and quality of service delivery; and (3) social policies and immigration in the US. Her global work includes women’s experiences during childbirth, family planning, and abortion services, development of quality improvement interventions in Kenya and India, and large-scale maternal and child health evaluations in Myanmar. She currently is Principal Investigator of the BRAVE Study (Bridging communities Raising API Voices for health Equity), the first study to assess the health status and health care utilization of undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander young adults. Using community participatory approaches, this study explores the impact of social policies, including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, on the social and health outcomes of undocumented young adults. She has collaborated with institutions and researchers in Myanmar, Kenya, India, Thailand and China.

    • Monica McLemore

      Monica McLemore
      @MCLEMOREMR

      Professor, Interim Director, Center for Anti-Racism in Nursing University of Washington, School of Nursing

    • Dr. Monica R. McLemore is a tenured professor in the Child, Family, and Population Health Department and the Interim Director for the Center for Anti-Racism in Nursing at the University of Washington School of Nursing. Prior to her arrival at UW, she was a tenured associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco and was named the Thelma Shobe Endowed Chair in 2021. She retired from clinical practice as a public health and staff nurse after a 28-year clinical nursing career in 2019, however, continues to provide flu and COVID-19 vaccines. Her program of research is focused on understanding reproductive health and justice. To date, she has 93 peer reviewed articles, OpEds and commentaries and her research has been cited in the Huffington Post, Lavender Health, five amicus briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States, and three National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine reports, and a data visualization project entitled How To Fix Maternal Mortality: The first step is to stop blaming women that was published in the 2019 Future of Medicine edition of Scientific American. Her work has also appeared in publications such as Dame Magazine, Politico, ProPublica/NPR and she made a voice appearance in Terrance Nance’s HBO series Random Acts of Flyness. She is the recipient of numerous awards and currently serves as chair for Sexual and Reproductive Health section of the American Public Health Association. She was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 2019. She became the Editor in Chief of Health Equity Journal in 2022.

    • Elizabeth Armstrong

      Elizabeth Armstrong
      @PRINCETON

      Head of Butler College, Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Princeton University

    • Elizabeth M Armstrong is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology with joint affiliations in The Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the Office of Population Research. Her research interests include public health, the history and sociology of medicine, risk in obstetrics, and medical ethics. She is currently conducting research on diseases and agenda-setting, and on fetal personhood and the evolution of obstetrical practice and ethics. She is the author or coauthor of articles in Health Affairs, Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Marriage and the Family, International Family Planning Perspectives, and Studies in Family Planning and is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003). She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan from 1998-2000. Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.

    • Fiona Challacombe

      Fiona Challacombe
      @DRFIONACH

      NIHR Clinical
      Lecturer,
      Kings College London


    • Dr. Challacombe qualified as a clinical psychologist from the IOPPN, King’s College London in 2005. After working in clinical practice she gained a Peggy Pollak research fellowship from the Psychiatry Research Trust and completed a PhD at King’s College London in 2014. Her research examined the impact of perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder on women and children. She conducted the first randomised controlled trial of CBT for postpartum OCD, investigating treatment effects on anxiety and parenting. She joined the Section of Women’s Mental Health at the IOPPN in 2017 and gained an NIHR fellowship to investigate treatments for perinatal anxiety disorders in 2018. She is a senior clinician at the Maudsley Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma (CADAT) where she has developed and leads a sub-service for parents with anxiety disorders. She is author of the self-help book Break Free from OCD and a therapist treatment manual CBT for OCD.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Abolition, Incarceration, and the Public’s Health

Recently, the issue of prison reform has been gaining national attention, forcing policymakers to rethink the issue. As momentum grows to call for change, how does public health play a role in ending mass incarceration and reforming a criminal justice system?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo   NCHEC CHES Logo      

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, September 28, 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_09282022
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The United States is the most incarcerated nation in the world. Decades of harmful policies have led to overcrowded prisons and a broken criminal justice system, leading to prison populations that are disproportionately poor and people of color. Recently, the issue of prison reform has been gaining national attention, forcing policymakers to rethink the issue. As momentum grows to call for change, how does public health play a role in ending mass incarceration and reforming a criminal justice system?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how housing can be a point of intervention to reduce the risk of incarceration
  • Describe the abolitionist approach to end cycles of incarceration
  • Compare community violence intervention and alternative community first responder programs to the criminal justice system approach currently in place in the United States
  • Give examples of courses that can train public health students to understand and develop strategies to address mass criminalization and mass incarceration 
  • Discuss how an integrated advocacy approach, using public health research, can support abolishment of major systems of oppression


Moderator

  • Deborah Douglas

    Deborah Douglas
    @DEBOFFICIALLY

    Co-Editor in Chief, The Emancipator

  • DEBORAH D. DOUGLAS is co-editor in chief of The Emancipator. She previously served as the Eugene S. Pulliam Distinguished Visiting Professor at DePauw University, senior leader with The OpEd Project, amplifying underrepresented expert voices, and founding managing editor of MLK50: Justice Through Journalism. While teaching at Northwestern University, she spearheaded a graduate investigative journalism capstone on the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and taught best practices in Karachi, Pakistan. Douglas’ adventures in thought leadership were seeded at the Chicago Sun-Times where she served as Deputy Editorial Page Editor/Columnist. Deborah is author of the “U.S. Civil Rights Trail: A Traveler’s Guide to the People, Places, and Events That Made the Movement” (Moon, 2021), the first-ever travel guide to follow the official civil rights trail in the South, and a contributor to “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019” (OneWorld, 2021). Among her many recognitions, she received Chicago’s prestigious Studs Terkel Award and the Society of American Travel Writers 2021 Guidebook of the Year.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Angela Aidala

      Angela Aidala
      @COLUMBIAMSPH
      Associate Research Scientist, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health


    • Angela A. Aidala, Ph.D., is a Research Scientist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences. Her major interest is research, teaching, and service delivery strategies to work effectively with harder to reach or ‘hidden’ populations in urban settings crucial to understanding health disparities: disadvantaged and socially marginalized youth and adults challenged by unstable housing/ homeless experience, mental illness, substance use, and/or criminal justice involvement. She is committed to applied research — working with community members, policy makers, service providers, and advocates to translate research to inform policy and program decision making. Dr. Aidala currently leads a 10 year follow-up of a demonstration project that brought together multiple governmental agencies (Corrections, Homeless Services, Health), housing providers, and community stakeholders for a housing-based intervention for adults with complex needs and histories of cycling in and out of incarceration, homelessness, and crisis health care institutions – the Frequent Users Services Engagement (FUSE) initiative. Documented success of the original project has inspired multiple jurisdictions throughout the US to launch similar efforts. The FUSE long term follow-up study analyzes the role of stable housing as a critical component of successful community reentry, not just in the short term but considering impacts over the life course. We examine longitudinal trajectories among multiple life domains –incarceration, housing, and health – analyzing interdependencies and policy and institutional contexts.

    • Dana Rice

      Dana Rice
      @DKRICEDRPH

      Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health 

    • Dana Rice, DrPH, assistant professor, is a public health practitioner and researcher who examines best practices in public health leadership and community engagement with a health equity, social justice and human rights lens. Her primary focus is on the integration of public health and correctional health systems and the impact of mass criminalization and mass incarceration on public health. She was a recipient of the student-nominated Award for Excellence in Teaching and Innovation, the peer-nominated Delta Omega Faculty Award and a UNC Equity in Teaching fellow. Prior to joining the faculty at Gillings, Dr. Rice spent 20 years working in the public, private and non-profit sectors. Her most recent work was dedicated to designing, implementing and evaluating an HIV/STD screening program in a large urban jail and training graduate public health and medical students in translating applied public health practice skills to a variety of community settings.

    • Insha Rahman

      Insha Rahman
      @VERAINSTITUTE

      Vice President of Vera Action, Vice President of Advocacy and Partnerships

    • Insha Rahman is Vice President for Advocacy and Partnerships at the Vera Institute of Justice and Vice President of Vera Action, Vera’s 501c4 sister organization. She leads the development of Vera and Vera Action’s advocacy priorities and campaigns across the organization, partnering with government, advocates, and organizers to win policy change to end mass incarceration and build safe, thriving communities for all. Insha is a nationally recognized expert on bail reform and pretrial justice. In addition to overseeing Vera and Vera Action’s advocacy priorities, she supervises the organization’s place-based initiatives in California, Louisiana, and New York. She has been quoted as an expert in several outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, and PBS. Prior to joining Vera, she was a public defender at The Bronx Defenders. She graduated with a BA in Africana Studies from Vassar College and earned her J.D. from the City University of New York School of Law.

    • Emile DeWeaver

      Emile DeWeaver

      @PRSNRENAISSANCE

      Author; Co-founder,
      Prison  Renaissance

    • Emile is an African-American activist whose life sentence in prison was commuted by California’s Governor Brown after 21 years for his community work in prison. While in prison, he was a culture writer for Easy Street Magazine; he co-founded Prison Renaissance, and despite the criminalization of organizing in California prisons, he covertly organized in prison to pass legislation that changed the way California treats juveniles in its criminal legal system. Currently Emile holds workshops on abolitionist strategies to develop policy and programs, and he’s working on his memoir for The New Press titled Ghost in the Prison Industrial Machine.

    • Zal Shroff

      Zal Shroff
      @LCCRSF
      Senior Attorney, Racial Justice, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights


    • Zal is a Senior Staff Attorney on the Racial Justice team. Prior to joining LCCRSF, Zal was a Clinical Lecturer-in-Law at Yale Law School where he worked with students to improve ballot access for incarcerated individuals and supervised litigation against the federal Bureau of Prisons for its response to the pandemic. Before that, Zal was a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Kansas where he worked on a variety of civil rights cases spanning conditions of confinement, prosecutorial/police accountability, voting rights, race and religious discrimination, and First Amendment issues. Immediately after law school, Zal was the Clifford Chance Foundation Fellow at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he worked on non-profit in-house regulatory and compliance matters, and spearheaded a project on accessing state financial aid dollars for college in prison programs nationwide. Zal is a graduate of Brown University and received his JD from Columbia Law School. He is admitted to practice in New York, Connecticut, and Kansas, and is an MJP Registered Legal Aid Attorney in the State of California.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.