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Courses with keyword "Environmental Health"

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III

How can data from both the micro (neighborhood and community) level and the macro (national, global) level be used effectively to inform and motivate policy change?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH3.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the creation of large national data platforms by combining health data, socioeconomic data, and climate change-related exposure data
  • Discuss the methodological issues in assessing the impact of climate-change exposures and health using large heterogeneous sources of data
  • Discuss evidence of climate change-related exposures and adverse health effects from 3 recent epidemiological studies using large national data sets

Moderator

  • Patrick Kinney

    Patrick Kinney
    @PATRICKKINNEY20

    Professor, Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Dr. Kinney joined the School of Public Health faculty in January 2017 as the inaugural Beverly Brown Professor of Urban Health. He was trained as an air pollution epidemiologist at Harvard School of Public Health, and came to BU after two decades at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. In his time at Columbia, he showed how warming temperatures make air pollution like urban smog worse, and more harmful to populations. He led the development of an integrated modeling system to predict the air pollution health effects of climate change into the future. Working at the intersection of climate change, health, and policy, Kinney has conducted research from the South Bronx to China to rapidly growing cities throughout Africa. At Columbia, he also created an interdisciplinary research and teaching program examining the potential impacts of climate change on health. At BU, Kinney is developing a new program that focuses on assessing the health benefits of urban climate action plans, via strategies to promote active transport, green infrastructure, and clean vehicles.

    Subject Matter Expert


    • Francesca Dominici
      @FRANCESCADOMIN8

      Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    • Francesca Dominici, PhD is the co-Director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative, at the Harvard University and the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the International Society of Mathematical Statistics. She is an expert in causal inference, machine learning, Bayesian statistics. She leads an interdisciplinary group of scientists with the ultimate goal of addressing important questions in environmental health science, climate change, and biomedical science. Her productivity and contributions to the field have been remarkable. Dominici has provided the scientific community and policy makers with robust evidence on the adverse health effects of air pollution, noise pollution, and climate change. Her studies have directly and routinely impacted air quality policy. Dominici has published more than 220 peer-reviewed publications and was recognized in Thomson Reuter’s 2019 list of the most highly cited researchers–ranking in the top 1% of cited scientists in her field. Her work has been covered by the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, BBC, the Guardian, CNN, and NPR. In April 2020 she has been awarded the Karl E. Peace Award for Outstanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society by the American Statistical Association. Dominici is an advocate for the career advancement of women faculty. Her work on the Johns Hopkins University Committee on the Status of Women earned her the campus Diversity Recognition Award in 2009. At the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, she has led the Committee for the Advancement of Women Faculty.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II

How can community-based organizations work effectively with academic institutions to address the effects of climate change in their communities? 

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe effective advocacy strategies employed by a community group (GreenRoots in Chelsea/East Boston) to address air quality and other environmental concerns
  • List 4 principles to promote climate justice (i.e., address climate adaption for vulnerable people in vulnerable places)
  • Describe 4 examples of actions that that US cities can take to address climate change
  • Describe the goals, activities, and achievements of the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA)
  • Explain research approach and methodologies to understand how housing characteristics are related to health impacts of heat among vulnerable populations

Moderator

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma

    Amruta Nori-Sarma
    @ASANSREASON

    Assistant Professor,  Boston University School of Public Health

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Health Department at Boston University School of Public Health, where she studies the relationship between environmental exposures associated with climate change and health outcomes in vulnerable communities. Her previous work has examined the impact of heat waves and air pollution on health in vulnerable communities in India, South Korea, and across the US. Her current research aims to understand the impacts of interrelated extreme weather events on mental health across the US utilizing large claims datasets. She also has an interest in evaluating the success of policies put in place to reduce the health impacts of climate change.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Marie S. O'Neill

      Marie S. O'Neill

      Professor,
      Department of Epidemiology,
      University of Michigan

    • Marie O’Neill (she/her/hers) has a B.A. from Brown University, an MS in Environmental Health Sciences from Harvard University, and a PhD in Epidemiology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Pan American Health Organization, and in Mexico at the National Institute of Public Health and the National Center for Environmental Health as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research interests include health effects of air pollution, temperature extremes and climate change (mortality, asthma, hospital admissions, birth outcomes and cardiovascular endpoints); environmental exposure assessment; and socio-economic influences on health. She served on the Federal Advisory Committee to the third National Climate Assessment. She is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences at University of Michigan School of Public Health and serves as Faculty Co-Lead for Diversity Equity and Inclusion at the School. She has been involved in several Federally funded research projects that address social disparities in climate effects on health, including a community-based participatory research project based in Detroit called Climate Hazards, Housing and Health.

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod

      Kathy Baughman McLeod
      @KBMCLEODFLA
      Director, Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, Senior Vice President Atlantic Council

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod leads the Center’s global strategy to reach one billion people worldwide with climate resilience solutions by 2030, with a special focus on society’s most vulnerable. She also chairs the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA), a global alliance of 40+ government officials, disaster relief organizations, climate scientists, public health and medical experts, businesses, and nonprofits, that is delivering early warning, policy, finance, and on-the-ground solutions, including appointing Chief Heat Officers in cities around the world. Additionally, she is spearheading the global push to name and categorize heat waves to save lives and build the culture of awareness and preparedness necessary to combat extreme heat. Kathy is currently a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Commission on “BiodiverCities by 2030” and a member of the Operating Committee of the Insurance Development Forum (IDF). Under her direction, Arsht-Rock is also a managing partner for the UN’s “Race to Resilience” campaign and Resilience Hub at COP26 — the UN’s flagship climate conference. Formerly, she served as Global Executive for Environmental and Social Risk at Bank of America, Managing Director for Climate Resilience at The Nature Conservancy — where she helped devise the world’s first insurance product on a natural asset; a 40 km stretch of the Mesoamerican reef in Mexico. She also served as Deputy Chief of Staff for the elected Treasurer/CFO of the State of Florida, where she was instrumental in making the Florida Treasury the first in the nation to publicly analyze and disclose the financial risks of climate. Kathy was also an appointed Florida Climate and Energy Commissioner. Baughman McLeod is the recipient of the Fuqua School of Business 2021 “Leader of Consequence” award and was appointed to the US Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council as its first-ever climate specialist in 2021. She holds an MBA from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and an MS in Geography from Florida State University.

    • Sharon Harlan

      Sharon Harlan

      Professor and Department Chair, Department of Health Sciences,
      Northeastern University

    • Dr. Harlan’s research explores the human impacts of climate change that are dependent upon people’s positions in social hierarchies, places in built environments of unequal quality, and policies that improve or impede human adaptive capabilities. Focusing on excessive heat and urban water systems as significant and increasingly critical threats to human health and well-being in cities, she studies social systems and landscapes that produce unequal risks for people in neighborhoods divided by social class and race/ethnicity. She has led multi-institutional, interdisciplinary research and community engagement projects that integrate social theories about the historical production of environmental injustices with data and models from the ecological, geospatial, and health sciences. She is currently conducting research on vulnerability to electrical grid failures and water affordability and accessibility in environmental justice communities across selected cities in the United States. Her coupled natural and human systems research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation on urban vulnerability to climate change, sustainability and water, the Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research program, and national and metropolitan area surveys on environmental attitudes and behaviors. She has served as an advisor on climate justice and social vulnerability to organizations such as the American Sociological Association, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Social Science Coordinating Committee of the U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program.

    • Roseann Bongiovanni

      Roseann Bongiovanni (CAS’99, SPH’01)

      @GREENROOTSEJ

      Executive Director, GreenRoots

    • Roseann Bongiovanni has worked for environmental justice for more than 25 years. Her extensive career began as a young organizer with the Chelsea Green Space Committee and included victories defeating the construction of a diesel power plant, and preventing ethanol “bomb” trains from traveling to a Chelsea Creek oil terminal. In 2016, Roseann transitioned this vital work into the independent environmental justice and public health organization, GreenRoots, which played a critical role in the response to COVID-19 in Chelsea and East Boston. Under her leadership, Chelsea was named a Culture of Health Prize Winner in 2017, GreenRoots was selected as a Social Innovator in 2018, and was named a US EPA Merit Award Winner in 2021. Roseann has raised and managed millions of dollars for major projects including Creekside Commons Park; federally funded air emissions reduction work, five urban growing spaces; murals and other public art projects; massive tree plantings; and multiple community parks. Roseann has received numerous awards for her work, including the Alternatives for Community and Environment Founders’ Award in 2001, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Hero Award in 2006 and the All Chelsea Award “Adult Resident of the Year” in 2007, an MLK Jr. Community Spirit Award by People’s AME Church in Chelsea in 2020 and a US EPA Merit Award in 2021. She has co-authored several publications. Roseann is a lifelong Chelsea resident, a former City Councilor, and City Council President. She has a Masters of Public Health from Boston University and is the mother of two strong-minded children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I

How can public health practitioners communicate accurate information about climate change to individuals and communities to motivate action?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    9:00 AM – 9:45 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session II
    Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss intervention activities that can and should be done immediately for short-term and long-term impact
  • Describe connections between climate change impacts and social determinants of health resulting in health disparities
  • List 5 environmental potential contributors to adverse effects on the mental health of young people
  • Define the roles and responsibilities of the new federal Office of Climate Change and Health Equity

Moderator

  • Greg Wellenius

    Greg Wellenius
    @GWELLENIUS

    Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Gregory Wellenius, ScD leverages his training in epidemiology, environmental health, and human physiology to lead research focused on assessing the human health impacts of the built environment in the context of a rapidly changing climate. His team has made a number of notable contributions to our understanding of the health risks associated with air pollution, noise pollution, other features of our physical environment, and those posed by a changing climate. A key goal of his team’s research is to provide the actionable scientific evidence needed to ensure that our communities are as resilient, sustainable, and healthy as possible, emphasizing the benefits to human health of climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. Before coming to Boston University, Dr. Wellenius served as faculty and Director of Brown University’s Center for Environmental Health and Technology and Elected Councilor of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE). He has previously taught courses on epidemiology methods, climate change and human health, and methods in environmental epidemiology. He has a strong track record of mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Wellenius is the 2019 recipient of the ISEE Tony McMichael Mid-Term Career Award and the 2018 recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Brown University School of Public Health.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • John Balbus

      John Balbus
      @DRJBALBUS
      Interim Director, Office of Climate Change and Health Equity, US Department of Health and Human Services

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret

Inequities in waste water infrastructure is a wide-spread but largely under-appreciated problem in the United States.  How can public health professionals bring light to the problem and thus help propel needed changes in policy and resource allocation?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, September 9th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_WOWFAMDS
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Partnership Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

SPH Reads is a school-wide reading program hosted by the Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice. The 2021 book selection is Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret, by Catherine Coleman Flowers.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss waste water infrastructure as an example of environmental injustice
  • Identify examples of systemic racism and classism that have negatively affected health in the United States
  • Identify possible specific activities individuals can participate in to address large issues of climate change and structural racism

Subject Matter Experts

  • Catherine Coleman Flowers

    Catherine Coleman Flowers
    @CATHFLOWERS

    Environmental and Climate Justice Activist, Author

  • Catherine Coleman Flowers is an internationally recognized environmental activist, MacArthur “genius” grant recipient, and author. She has dedicated her life’s work to advocating for environmental justice, primarily equal access to clean water and functional sanitation for communities across the United States. Founder of the Center for Rural Enterprise and Environmental Justice (CREEJ), Flowers has spent her career promoting equal access to clean water, air, sanitation, and soil to reduce health and economic disparities in marginalized, rural communities. In addition, Flowers serves as Rural Development Manager for Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), is a Board Member for the Center for Earth Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, and sits on the Board of Directors for the Climate Reality Project and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Flowers is also Co-Chair of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Commission on Accelerating Climate Action and Practitioner in Residence at Duke University. In 2021, her leadership and fervor in fighting for solutions to these issues led her to one of her most notable appointments yet — Vice Chair of the Biden Administration’s inaugural White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council. Flowers was also named Levenick Resident Scholar in Sustainable Leadership at the University of Illinois for the spring 2021 and was awarded an honorary PhD in science from Wesleyan University. As the author of Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret, Flowers shares her inspiring story of advocacy, from childhood to environmental justice champion. She discusses sanitation and its correlation with systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that affects people across the United States. She has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Bloomberg, The Guardian, and on PBS.

  • Barbara Moran

    Barbara Moran
    @MORANWRITER

    Moderator
    Senior Producing Editor
    WBUR

  • Barbara Moran, environmental editor, WBUR For more than 20 years, Moran has worked as a science journalist committed to covering issues of public health, environmental justice and the intersection of science and society. She has written for many publications, including The New York Times, New Scientist, Technology Review and the Boston Globe Magazine, and produced television documentaries for PBS and others. A few years ago she added radio reporting to her repertoire, and now runs WBUR’s three-person environmental team, which covers stories about energy, ecology and environmental justice for Boston and beyond. She was a Knight Fellow at MIT, and was twice awarded the National Association of Science Writers’ highest honor, the Science in Society Award.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Tackling Climate Change: Mitigation or Adaptation

How can we present climate change science as “kitchen table” issues that resonate with the public, policymakers, and decision makers?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce, emergency management, health care workers, human services, agricultural workers, community leaders, and others interested in climate change.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Wednesday, February 10, 2021 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137
    Event ID: SS1131137_TCCMA.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, If you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
     
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The global climate has changed profoundly over the last century and now threatens the health and well-being of families and communities around the world. With continued climate change we can expect to see more severe and more frequent extreme weather events such as heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and floods. The global community must move quickly to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, but there are multiple ways to do so with no clear “one size fits all” solution. This program will ask, should future efforts focus on facilitating large scale mitigation efforts, helping communities and individuals adapt to a changing climate, or do we simply need more research? This year’s Bicknell Lecture will highlight the threats to human health posed by climate change and host a vibrant dialogue with leading experts on how to most productively move forward to address this global challenge.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List three criteria to assess level of international commitment to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050
  • Discuss importance of effective communication strategies to influence policy makers regarding climate change
  • Discuss the role of economic investment in addressing climate change and strategies to engage investors in changing the management of their portfolios


Moderator

  • Gregory Wellenius

    Gregory Wellenius

    Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Gregory Wellenius, ScD leverages his training in epidemiology, environmental health, and human physiology to lead research focused on assessing the human health impacts of the built environment in the context of a rapidly changing climate. His team has made a number of notable contributions to our understanding of the health risks associated with air pollution, noise pollution, other features of our physical environment, and those posed by a changing climate. A key goal of his team’s research is to provide the actionable scientific evidence needed to ensure that our communities are as resilient, sustainable, and healthy as possible, emphasizing the benefits to human health of climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts.
    Before coming to Boston University, Dr. Wellenius served as faculty and Director of Brown University’s Center for Environmental Health and Technology and Elected Councilor of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE). He has previously taught courses on epidemiology methods, climate change and human health, and methods in environmental epidemiology. He has a strong track record of mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Wellenius is the 2019 recipient of the ISEE Tony McMichael Mid-Term Career Award and the 2018 recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Brown University School of Public Health.


Subject Matter Experts

  • Rachel Kyte

    Rachel Kyte

    Dean,
    Fletcher School
    at
    Tufts University

  • Marshall Shepherd

    Marshall Shepherd

    Professor of Geography and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Georgia

  • Anne Simpson

    Anne Simpson

    Managing Investment Director, Board Governance & Sustainability, CalPERS

  • Madeleine Thomson

    Madeleine Thomson

    Head, Our Planet, Our Health program at Wellcome Trust


  • Registration and Contact Hours

    Select the Enroll button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

How has this pandemic sharpened our thinking around how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post COVID era?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and thinking on climate change
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, May 14, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 0.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 05142020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. The pandemic has sharpened our thinking and informed insights around climate change, impacting how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post-COVID era.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe health effects and their costs as a result of climate change
  • Name 5 interventions that benefit both health and climate
  • Name 3 lessons from COVID-19 experience that inform climate change action
  • Explain the influence of both COVID-19 and climate change on health inequity

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

      Subject Matter Experts


      • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

        Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
        Boston University School of Public Health

      • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


      • Mona Sarfaty

        Director, Program for Climate and Health, George Mason
        University

      • Mona Sarfaty, MD MPH FAAFP, is the Director of the Program on Climate and Health in the Center for Climate Change Communication. The Program collaborates with medical societies and research organizations to increase awareness, research, and preventive activity regarding the health effects of climate change. As a family medicine professor and physician for over 30 years, Dr. Sarfaty has engaged in research and teaching focused on primary care, cancer screening, and public policy, including the health effects of climate change. She has lectured at national and regional venues including medical societies, health plans, health departments, professional organizations, and government conferences. Dr. Sarfaty is the author of widely circulated guides and articles on how to increase cancer screening rates in practice and on improving practice outcomes by using the features of the patient centered medical home. Since 2003, Dr. Sarfaty has been on the faculty of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia as Associate Professor of Family Medicine. She has engaged in research, teaching, and patient care. She has held a joint appointment in the Jefferson School of Population Health. From 1992-2003, she was on the faculty of the George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center with a joint appointment in the GWU School of Public Health and Health Services. During her years at GWU, she was the Medical Director of the Montgomery County Cancer Crusade and the Primary Care Coalition of Montgomery County, and the Founding Director of the Community Oriented Primary Care Track of the MPH Program. From 1985-92, Dr. Sarfaty served as the Associate Director for Health Policy and Senior Health Policy Advisor for the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources (the principal authorizing committee in the Senate for health programs). She authored major pieces of legislation, planned hearings, and advised Senators on both sides of the aisle. Dr. Sarfaty has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians since 1980. She is a long time member of American Public Health Association (APHA), where she has served as Chair and Governing Councilor of the Medical Care Section. She also served on the Board of Directors for the Association of Prevention Teachers and Researchers (APTR), the professional arm of the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sarfaty is an invited member of the distinguished National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. She has received many awards for her work. Selected publications are listed below.


      • Renee Salas

        Yerby Fellow, Center for Climate, Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public  Health

      • Renee N. Salas, MD, MPH, MS is a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an emergency medicine physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). She received her Doctor of Medicine from the innovative five-year medical school program to train physician-investigators at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. She concurrently obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Research from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she received a Master of Public Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with a concentration in environmental health while completing a Fellowship in Wilderness Medicine at MGH. She now has a sole academic concentration on climate change and health. As a 2018 Burke Fellow, she is addressing the current research gaps in this field. She served as the lead for the 2018 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change U.S. Brief and is a nationally recognized leader on this subject.


      • Jalonne White-Newsome

        Senior Program
        Officer,
        The Kresge
        Foundation

      • Jalonne L. White-Newsome is a senior program officer at The Kresge Foundation, responsible for the Environment Program’s grant portfolio on Climate Resilient and Equitable Water Systems (CREWS). Jalonne is also a core team member of Kresge’s Climate Change, Health and Equity Initiative, supporting grantmaking across the public health sector. Before joining Kresge in 2016, Jalonne served as director of federal policy at West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. (WE ACT), where she led national campaigns to ensure that the concerns of low-income communities of color were integrated into federal policy, particularly on issues of clean air, climate change and health. She is an adjunct professor at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. As a researcher on climate, health and equity, Jalonne was a lead author for the human health chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. She provides leadership on various boards, including the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Change and Society, the US Climate Action Network, Health Environmental Funder’s Network Steering Committee and the Urban Water Funder’s Group. A native of Detroit, Jalonne earned a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Southern Methodist University and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University. Jalonne has recently been recognized by Who’s Who in America, The Environmental Management Association’s Environmental Achievement Award, the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and is a 2017 PLACES Fellow alum with The Funders Network.


      • Greg Wellenius

        Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

      • Gregory Wellenius is an associate professor of epidemiology in the Brown School of Public Health. His research focuses on the environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, including in China. Much of his work has examined the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of cardiovascular events and its effects on cardiovascular physiology. In the context of these studies, he has used tools from the fields of epidemiology and toxicology to: 1) evaluate the association between environmental exposures and disease, 2) identify subgroups of the population that may be particularly susceptible, and 3) elucidate the physiologic mechanisms for the observed effects. Wellenius has served as a research consultant to the Chinese government’s Center for Disease Control (CDC), and is currently engaged with the Chinese CDC in collaborative empirical research.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

      * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

An Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases and their Drivers

Why are zoonoses and vectorborne diseases increasing?

 
 NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo    NCHEC CHES Logo   


Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, veterinarians, human health clinicians, environmental scientists, students, and others interested in zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Format: Recorded screencasts, available on demand
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 4 screencasts, 30 minutes each (2 hours total)
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:

    Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_12152020 . 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion trainings: An Introduction to One Health
  • Pre-requisites: None



About this course

In the first of four screencasts the public health practitioner is introduced to zoonoses and vectorborne diseases and how they differ from other infectious diseases. In subsequent screencasts, the factors (drivers) that influence zoonoses and vectorborne disease are explained, including human systems, human-animal-environment interaction, and environmental change. Multiple disease-specific examples are provided, including COVID-19.

Zoonotic diseases are those that can be passed between humans and other vertebrate animals and vectorborne disease are those that are transmitted by an arthropod vector like a flea or tick. Because non-human animals serve as a disease reservoir or vector, disease prevention and control strategies differ from other infectious diseases. More than half, an estimated 60%, of all the kinds of infections that people can get are zoonotic and 75% of emerging infectious diseases, including COVID-19, are zoonotic. There are many human-driven factors that influence zoonotic disease emergence and re-emergence. These drivers include infrastructure, travel and trade, culture, agricultural intensification, interaction with domestic and wild animals, climate change, land use, and biodiversity. In this series of four screencasts, you will be introduced to zoonotic and vectorborne diseases and their drivers.

What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to...

Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases

  • Define zoonoses, vectorborne diseases, emerging zoonotic diseases, reverse zoonoses, reservoir host, amplification, dead-end host, and spillover
  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Describe how the following disease prevention and control tools differ for zoonotic and vectorborne diseases: education, surveillance, vector control, diagnostics, outbreak investigation, host identification, and vaccination
  • Define One Health and explain why this approach is useful for addressing zoonotic and vector-borne diseases

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human Systems

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases related to human systems and culture
  • Provide examples of how infrastructure influences zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that have emerged as a result of human travel and trade
  • Provide examples of how culture impacts zoonotic and vectorborne disease

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human-animal-environment Interactions

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne disease related to human-animal interactions
  • Provide examples of diseases that can be spread from pets and livestock to people
  • Explain how agricultural systems influence zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that can result from human or domestic animal interaction with wildlife

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Environmental Change

  • List three key environmental drivers that impact zoonotic and vectorborne disease
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne disease influenced by weather and climate
  • Explain how land use and ecosystem disruption can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Explain how biodiversity can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases

Subject Matter Expert


  • Lynn Zanradi Blevins

  • Lynn Zanradi Blevins has been practicing public health in government and academic settings for 20 years in the areas of infectious disease, environmental health, emergency preparedness, and One Health (human-animal-environmental health).



    Enrollment and Contact Hours

    Select the Enroll button below to register for the course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement:

    This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Self-Paced

Human Health Effects of Climate Change

Do you know how climate change will affect health in your community and what you can do to reduce climate-related impacts?


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Enroll

Course Information

  • Audience: Workforce in public health, emergency management, health care, natural resources, human services, agriculture, community leaders, and others intersecting with climate change and human health
  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: Level 1: 1 hour
    Level 2: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HHECC.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental Materials:Course Guide
  • Pre-requisites:None

About this course

Following a short overview of the causes and mechanisms of climate change, the course reviews current and expected human health impacts, with particular emphasis on impacts in Vermont and the northeast. These include heat-related illness, water-related impacts, vector borne diseases, air quality impacts, and mental health and well-being. Because climate change affects some people more than others, populations of concern and measures of vulnerability are addressed. The course culminates with examples of strategies used in Vermont and nationally to reduce climate change impacts on health and to improve health through climate change mitigation actions. Learners can select Level 1 for an overview or Level 2 for a deeper exploration of the five types of health impacts.


What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to...

  • Explain how and why the climate is changing.
  • List the health conditions exacerbated by climate change, explain how weather/climate affects each health condition, and how we expect future climate change to modify health risks.
  • List those populations more vulnerable to the effects of climate change and explain why they are vulnerable.
  • Describe the health co-benefits of climate change mitigation strategies.
  • Describe climate adaptation and preparedness strategies to reduce climate-related health risks.


Subject Matter Experts


  • Jared Ulmer, MPH, AICP

    Climate & Health
    Program Coordinator,
    Vermont Department of Health


  • Lynn Blevins, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant
    Professor,
    University of Vermont
    College of Medicine



  • David Grass, PhD

    Environmental Health
    Surveillance Chief,
    Vermont Department of Health


  • Elizabeth Faye, MPH

    Instructional Technologist
    Activist Lab,
    BU School of
    Public Health


Enrollment and Contact Hours

Note there are two different options for enrolling in this course highlighted in the table below.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the module. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Having trouble accessing the course? Contact support@nephtc.org


Acknowledgement:

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP27877 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program”. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Self-Paced

Monitoring for Cyanobacteria

What is cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and how do we reduce risk among visitors to recreational waters? Learn how to detect the presence of cyanobacteria and manage recreational waters if it is present.


UV University of Vermont Logo    NCHEC CHES Logo   PHLN Public Health Learning Navigator Quality Seal


Enroll

Course Information

  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MC.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental materials: Course Guide and Technical Requirements (PDF)
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this course

This course provides an overview of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and the risks it poses to people and pets. Learn how to monitor recreational waters for cyanobacteria (including distinguishing it from look-alikes), manage recreational waters when cyanobacteria is present, and track blooms. Information is provided on documentation through photographs, water sampling and reporting systems.

This training is intended for public health and environmental personnel, state and municipal employees responsible for management of recreational waters, citizen scientists participating in a cyanobacteria monitoring program, as well as anyone interested in learning about cyanobacteria and how recreational waters are monitored and managed from a public health perspective.

This training was developed in conjunction with the University of Vermont, Vermont Department of Health, and Lake Champlain Committee to address the concern about water quality in Vermont. Therefore, the regulations and administrative processes cited are specific to Vermont. However, the underlying science and public health implications are applicable to all states and jurisdictions.


What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to answer the following questions.

  • What are cyanobacteria?
  • What are the risks to people and pets?
  • How do you monitor for it?
  • What should you do if you find it?
  • How can you track instances?


Subject Matter Expert


  • Lynn Blevins

    Clinical Assistant Professor
    University of Vermont
    College of Medicine

Enrollment and Contact Hours

Note there are two different options for enrolling in this course highlighted in the table below.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the module. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

If you wish to receive contact hours in Massachusetts, please go to the Massachusetts-specific training on Recreational Waters.

Category: Self-Paced

Maintaining Safe Recreational Waters

How do we minimize the public health hazards experienced by visitors to recreational waters? Learn about the health hazards common to recreational waters and how to manage them.

UV University of Vermont Logo      PHLN Public Health Learning Navigator Quality Seal    NCHEC CHES Logo

Enroll

Course Information

  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MSRW.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental materials: Course Guide and Technical Requirements (PDF)
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this course

This course reviews the four health hazards common to recreational waters: biological, chemical, physical, and cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Information is provided on water sampling and testing, visual monitoring, reporting, and recreational water management (i.e., beach closure, signage). This training is intended for the environmental public health workforce, state and municipal employees responsible for management of recreational waters, as well as anyone interested in understanding how recreational waters are monitored and managed from a public health perspective.

This training is intended for public health and environmental personnel, state and municipal employees responsible for management of recreational waters, citizen scientists participating in a cyanobacteria monitoring program, as well as anyone interested in learning about cyanobacteria and how recreational waters are monitored and managed from a public health perspective.

While the regulations and administrative processes cited are specific to Vermont, the underlying science and public health implications are applicable to all states and jurisdictions.


What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to address the following questions.

  • Identify common recreational water hazards
  • Describe regulations and strategies to prevent recreational waterborne illnesses
  • Describe methods to monitor, sample, and test recreational water
  • Explain the process for posting warning signs and closing beaches


Subject Matter Expert


  • Lynn Blevins

    Clinical Assistant Professor
    University of Vermont
    College of Medicine

Enrollment and Contact Hours

Note there are two different options for enrolling in this course highlighted in the table below.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the module. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

If you wish to receive contact hours in Massachusetts, please go to the Massachusetts-specific training on Recreational Waters.

Category: Self-Paced