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Courses with keyword "MUCP and Racism"

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, medical professionals, researchers
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, June 30th 2022
    9:00 AM – 12:30 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 2 part series, 3.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 3.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  PM1131137_06302022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: The History and Contemporary Reality of Black Communities in Maine
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

This webinar will explore race as a social construct and its implications in data collection and research. Participants will hear from presenters how the concept of race originated and how to uphold diversity and equity in research and policy, with specific examples of the implications of systemic racism in policies in Maine.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe race as a social construct
  • Explain the implications of race in data collection and research
  • Identify two ways to uphold diversity and equity in research and policy

This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Winfred Williams

    Winfred Williams, MD

  • Dr. Win Williams is the Associate Chief of the MGH Division of Nephrology and Founding Director of the MGH Center for Diversity and Inclusion. He has a long, foundational track record at MGH in the development of programs to enhance the diversity of the physician workforce and at the Harvard Medical School. Over the past two decades, he has helped develop critical initiatives to support hospital-wide diversity goals. Dr. Williams is also the deputy director of the New England Journal of Medicine. He graduated from Harvard College with a B.A. in Biochemical Sciences. He went on to medical school at the New York University School of Medicine and completed his residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

  • Bruce King

    Bruce King

  • Bruce King is the Co-Executive Director of Maine Inside Out. His focus is on the leadership, growth and community outreach for MIO. Bruce’s lived experience as a previously incarcerated individual provides him with the insight critical to building connection and promoting healing for the people and communities he interacts with. Prior to joining MIO, Bruce worked in the fields of substance use disorder and recovery, mentoring and coaching multicultural youth and community building. As a second generation Mexican American, Bruce serves on the Permanent Commission on the Status of Racial, Indigenous and Maine Tribal Populations to address disparate treatment of marginalized ethnic groups and actualize racial justice. He is on the board of Mindbridge and an active member of the Prison Reentry Network.

  • Keith Maddox

    Keith Maddox

  • Keith Maddox earned his A.B. in Psychology from the University of Michigan, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a Professor in the Psychology Department at Tufts University, Director of the Tufts University Social Cognition (TUSC) Lab. His research and teaching are focused on exploring social cognitive aspects of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. The long-range goal of this work is to further the understanding of the representation of stereotypic knowledge and its implications for the behavior and treatment of members of stereotyped groups. He is co-Director of the Diversity and Inclusion Leadership Program, has served as the Special Advisor to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusion at Tufts, and has founded an initiative at Tufts that seeks to bring social science evidence to bear on the development and evaluation of programs designed to address the challenges and opportunities associated with diversity, climate, and inclusion in organizations.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, medical professionals, researchers
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, June 29th 2022
    9:00 AM – 12:30 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 2 part series, 3.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 3.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  PM1131137_06292022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Race as a Social Construct in Data and Practice
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

Participants will learn about the history of slavery and racism in Maine, including the role of eugenics and the term Vacationland. Presenters will talk about our shared ancestry and how the slavery has impacted the way the world functions today. Participants will also learn specific examples of racism and how it plays out in communities.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how Maine’s history with slavery has impacted genocide, immigration, disinformation and racism in American culture.
  • Describe the hidden history of black communities in Maine.


Subject Matter Experts

  • Myron Beasley

    Myron M. Beasley, PhD

  • Myron M. Beasley, Ph.D. is Associate Professor and Chair of American Studies at Bates College. His ethnographic research explores the intersection of cultural politics, material culture and social change. His book, Disturbers of the peace: Performance, Art, and politics of the African Diaspora is currently in press by Routledge. Having conducted fieldwork in Morocco, Haiti, and Brazil he writes about art and food and the constructions of identity and culture. He is also an international curator and he is a trustee of the Maine Historic Society. He has been recognized with distinguished awards and fellowships by the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, the Kindling Fund, The Davis Family Foundation, the Reed Foundation, and Dorathea and Leo Rabkin Foundation. His writing appears in Liminalities: The Journal of Performance Studies, The Journal of Poverty, Text and Performance Quarterly, Museum & Social Issues, The Journal of Curatorial Studies and Performance Research, and Gastronomica.

  • Bob Greene

    Bob Greene

  • Bob Greene is a native of Portland and the eighth generation of his family to be born in Cumberland County. His roots in Maine stretch back into the 1700s. After graduating from Portland High, Bob went off to college and a career as a journalist, covering among other things airplane crashes, Mississippi River floods and the funeral of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He has met three presidents: Harry Truman, Lyndon Baines Johnson and Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. And, as The Associated Press Tennis Writer, Bob traveled the world covering the sport. After retiring he returned home to Maine where his genealogical research has led to his deep knowledge about Maine’s Black history. He currently teaches a Black History of Maine course at OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute} at the University of Southern Maine. Bob also is the 2021 recipient of the Maine Historical Society’s Neal Allen Award, which is presented each year for exceptional contributions to Maine History.

  • Pedro Vasquez

    Pedro Vazquez

  • Pedro A. Vázquez (he/him/his) is a community leader and organizer holding multiple roles dedicated to abolitionism, anti-racism, and uplifting of the community. His work highlights the need for just, equitable, diverse, and inclusive initiatives in all structures of society and demands accountability to aim beyond the cosmetic. A father of 6, he specifically engages with young people in recognition of their brilliance and natural ability to lead.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health workers, public health professionals, social service providers, policymakers
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, May 24th 2022
    11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05242022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

This webinar will describe the intersection between homelessness and housing and public health and health outcomes. It will discuss how housing is a social determinant of health and identify local solutions to ending homelessness.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe what homelessness looks like in Maine
  • Describe how homelessness intersects with health promotion and disease prevention
  • Identify 1-2 services and solutions to homelessness
  • Identify 1-2 ways Maine is approaching the design and delivery of homelessness services


Subject Matter Experts

  • Lauren Bustard

    Lauren Bustard

  • Lauren Bustard is the Senior Director of Homeless Initiatives at MaineHousing. Prior to joining MaineHousing in 2012, she worked for many years in social service and education programs in Maine, and in refugee and international development programs in Latin America and Southeast Asia.

  • Courtney Pladsen

    Courtney Pladsen
    DNP, FNP-BC

  • Courtney Pladsen is the Clinical Director at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council where she leads national efforts to improve health care quality and access for people experiencing homelessness through quality improvement initiatives, technical assistance, research, policy/advocacy, and training. She is a current fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Leader program for her work at the intersection of health and housing. She works clinically providing medical, mental health, and substance use treatment to people who are experiencing homelessness at the FQHC Greater Portland Health in Portland, Maine.

  • Cullen Ryan

    Cullen Ryan

  • Cullen Ryan has a 35-year career serving homeless and special needs populations. A formerly licensed clinician (LICSW) with a BA from the University of Vermont and a MA in Counseling and Psychological Services from St. Mary’s University (Minnesota), Cullen has provided street outreach, case management, family therapy, and individual/group psychotherapy to homeless adults, families, and adolescents in a variety of clinical and non-clinical settings in three states. Since 2004, Cullen Ryan has served as Executive Director of Community Housing of Maine, the largest housing provider for homeless populations in the state. Cullen currently co-chairs or chairs several Boards and Coalitions, and he serves as President of the Board of Directors for the Maine CoC. Cullen was a past Chair of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition, and recent Acting Chair of Maine’s Statewide Homeless Council, and actively serves on both. For more on Community Housing of Maine, go to www.chomhousing.org

  • Erin Healy

    Erin Healy

  • Erin Healy is a Strategy Lead for Large Scale Change at Built for Zero. Her work focuses on implementing the Built for Zero model on a statewide level. She has worked on issues related to the homeless sector for over fifteen years. Erin specializes in systems improvement, movement building, and helping collaborative teams set and achieve clear, measurable goals. After several years as an independent consultant, Erin re-joined the Community Solutions team in 2021. She was a member of CS’s 100,000 Home Campaign team (2012 – 2014) and helped launch Built for Zero in 2016. Erin holds a JD from the University of Washington School of Law and an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College.

  • Donna Kelley

    Donna Kelley
    MSW, LCSW

  • Donna Kelley is the President and CEO of Waldo Community Action Partners. She is Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Maine and joined WCAP in 2018. Prior to that she worked for Kennebec Behavioral Health for 19 years. Donna has been immersed in the community mental health and social services field for 32 years. She has worked to plan, develop, implement, and restructure mental health and community service programs and systems by working with local, regional, and statewide community-based organizations, groups, and governmental agencies to improved access and quality of services for consumers allowing for improved quality of life and greater self-sufficiency. Donna earned her undergraduate degree in Biology from the University of Maine, and her Master’s in Social Work from the University of New England in Biddeford.

  • Rich Hooks Wayman

    Rich Hooks Wayman

  • Rich Hooks Wayman serves as the President and CEO for Volunteers of America Northern New England (www.voanne.org), a nonprofit organization offering affordable housing, residential care and community based social services to communities in Maine and New Hampshire. Prior to his tenure at Volunteers of America, Richard served as the National Executive Director for the Children’s Defense Fund. Additionally, Richard was the CEO of a regional child welfare agency in Massachusetts, was the Executive Director of a statewide supportive housing program serving long term homeless persons in Minnesota, and conducted federal legislative advocacy and policy analysis for the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Richard attended the University of Iowa College of Law, graduating with a Juris Doctor in 1992, and the University of Iowa College of Law, graduating with a Juris Doctor in 1992. He is a member of the American Bar Association to has been appointed to the Commission on Homelessness and Poverty. Richard and his husband (Aaron) have six adoptive children.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Public Health, Medicine and Poverty

How has housing policy contributed to the disproportionate and extreme housing cost burdens of people and families of color?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, December 10th 2020 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_PHMP. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Noe
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Poverty poses a serious threat to the health of the public, as those living in poverty are less likely to be able to access the conditions that promote health. Panelists will discuss the intersections of health, medicine, and poverty, and how addressing the social factors that create health can lead to greater health for all.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of housing instability in health of individuals and of populations
  • List at least 3 risk factors for poor health outcomes that are associated with poverty
  • Describe the interrelationship among Medicaid, race, and poverty
  • Discuss the role of power as a social determinant of health and how it can be used to create change


Moderator

  • Natalia Linos

    Natalia Linos

    Executive Director, FXB Center at Harvard University


Subject Matter Experts

  • Soni Gupta

    Soni Gupta

    Director of Neighborhoods and Housing

  • Jamila Michener

    Jamila Michener

    Associate Professor, Cornell
    University

  • Phillomin Laptiste

    Phillomin Laptiste

    Executive Director, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

  • Hermina Palacio

    Herminia Palacio

    President and CEO, Guttmacher
    Institute

  • Michael Stein

    Michael Stein

    Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health workforce members interested in Systemic Inequities for black lives
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 10 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 55 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_SIIBL. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Recording

When looking at the disproportionate impact in health disparities on communities of color, the black community's experience can be an indicator of what is happening to all marginalized communities. It is possible that empathy is hard to have as a member of a less impacted community. If you don't see it and don't experience it, it seems you don't feel it.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List four ways in which Black and Brown communities have been disadvantaged more than white communities due to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Name three health impacts of not having stable and safe housing
  • Name two actions on housing policies that can reduce housing inequity
  • Name three ways that the Justice System can reduce racial injustice

Subject Matter Experts

  • Danielle Cooper
    Dr. Danielle Cooper
  • Dr. Danielle Cooper is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and the Director of Research at the Tow Youth Justice Institute at the University of New Haven. Dr. Cooper received her BS in Justice Systems (with a minor in Business Administration) in 2009 and her MA in Criminology from the University of Florida in 2011. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology (with a minor in Organizational Leadership for Nonprofits) from the University of Florida in 2015.
    In addition to her work as a Professor and the Director of Research at UNH, she is also a Certified Prevention Professional who works with nonprofits and community organizations as a prevention trainer and evaluation consultant. Through her work in the community, she has collaborated with key stakeholders, such as youth and their parents, law enforcement, mental health professionals, and youth-serving organizations.

  • Danielle Cooper
    Karen DuBois-Walton
  • Karen DuBois-Walton currently serves as the President of the Elm City Communities/Housing Authority of the City of New Haven and President of The Glendower Group, LLC (the development affiliate of HANH) and 360 Management Group, Inc. (the property management affiliate) responsible for administrative, programmatic and policy direction of the public housing, housing choice voucher program, finance and planning, and development activities.
    Dr. DuBois-Walton resides in New Haven. She is actively involved in a number of non-profit boards dedicating time to creating greater equity for those who are marginalized. She leads efforts within New Haven and the Region to remove barriers to fair housing, reverse housing segregation patterns, and to invest in under-resourced communities.

  • Linda K. Barry
    Linda K. Barry
  • Linda K. Barry, M.D., M.P.H., FACS is a board-certified liver and pancreas surgeon with a unique background in both clinical and basic science research. As an Associate Professor of Surgery, Dr. Barry practices and teaches at the University of Connecticut Medical School and holds the position of Director of the Office of Multicultural and Community. She previously served as Assistant Director and Chief Operating Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science (CICATS) at the University of Connecticut, Co-Director for the CICATS Pilot Program for Collaborative Translational and Clinical Research, Director of the Young Innovative Investigator Program, and Director of the CICATS M1 Mentorship Program. Dr. Barry’s professional experience and life’s work has been in addressing health disparities in health care delivery and research.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. 

Category: Webinars

“My BOSS Network” – A Conceptual Framework to Develop Social Capital

How can we use intersectionality of social capital, civic engagement and health equity to build a network that provides more “seats at the table” for policy input?

NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo CTPHA Connecticut Public Health Assocation Logo            

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 11, 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 20 min
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This presentation will discuss a model approach to increase capacity-building skills of individuals from under-served communities to strategically create strong social bridges and linkages; and purposefully build an effective network. Lessons drawn from a 10-months AmeriCorps service experience about the value of the intersectionality of social capital, civic engagement and health equity inform the development of a conceptual framework-- “My BOSS Network” and will drive the design of interventions that evaluate individuals perceived capabilities to leverage their social capital to gain a seat at the table and contribute to policy decisions that impact the health outcomes of their communities. Recorded at the CT Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Conference on Wednesday, November 11, 2020.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the intersectionality of health equity, civic engagement and social capital
  • Discuss a model framework to develop an influential social/professional informal network

Subject Matter Expert

  • Selina A. Osei
    Selina A. Osei
  • Selina A. Osei is a Public Health Practitioner who works with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)’s Population Health Management department on Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) programs. Selina aspires to work within the space of global health systems delivery design targeting resource-poor communities. With a purpose driven goal to achieve health equity so that everyone can have the opportunity to live up to their full potential, Selina also serves as the incumbent Communications & Membership Committee Chair for the Connecticut Chapter of the National Association for Health Service Executives (NAHSE). As a community organizer, AmeriCorps Alumni, and past student Ambassador for UNESCO, Selina is passionate about serving her community through volunteerism in her spare time. Selina graduated from University of Connecticut with a B.S in Chemistry, University at Albany School of Public Health with an MPH, earned her MD as an international medical graduate and pursued an MBA in business management from Davenport University to best achieve her purpose driven goals.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Engaging Indigenous Communities in Health Equity Activities

Learn more about this webinar!

Photo credit: Abigail Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), Director of the Urban Indian Health Institute

Engaging Indigenous Communities in Health Equity Activities


How can we ensure that the needs of indigenous communities are not overlooked in health equity efforts?

NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo CTPHA Connecticut Public Health Assocation Logo Health Education Center Logo 

NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 10 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 30 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: 01082021. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Recording

Indigenous communities, people who identify as American Indian and Alaska Native, have long faced systemic oppression in this country which is reflected in poor health outcomes. For example, indigenous communities have a life expectancy that is 5.5 years shorter than the national average. Learn about how Connecticut has treated indigenous communities in the past, how these injustices impact policy today and how you can engage this population in health planning. While the focus is on Connecticut, this presentation has information useful for practice in any state.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Name the indigenous communities in Connecticut
  • Describe how indigenous communities have been overlooked in health equity outcomes
  • Recall examples of state policies that resulted in unjust treatment of native peoples
  • Discuss strategies for outreach and inclusion for this population

Subject Matter Expert

  • Michele Scott
    Michele Scott Dixon (Mashantucket Pequot)
  • Michele Scott is the Executive Director of The Health Education Center located in Norwich, CT where she works diligently to ensure that the healthcare workforce pipeline reflects the communities it serves. She brings with her a background in community health, strategic planning, program evaluation and a commitment to equity within health systems. Michele serves as Chair of the Health Care Advisory Board of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation and is a member of The Arc Eastern Connecticut Board of Directors. Michele received her B.A in Psychology and American Studies from Columbia University and her M.S. in Organizational Leadership from Quinnipiac University. She resides on the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation with her family.

    Michele is available at scott@healtheducenter.org to answer any webinar follow up questions.



    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health and health professions students and faculty, interested community members
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: 3rd December 2020, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm ET, 9:00 am-10:30 am PT
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: 12032020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Webinar

The endeavor to digitize processes and centralize data that assess risk and grant access to vital community resources is inherently a negotiation in power, ownership, and social control. This session will explore the power dynamics inherent in public health data collection and how data integration platforms can functionally "do no harm."


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the ways public health data can be used to address and reinforce social inequality
  • Articulate anti-racist approaches to public health data collection

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH
    Pediatrician, Public Health Advocate, and Scholar
  • Rhea Boyd MD, MPH is a pediatrician, public health advocate, and scholar who writes and teaches on the relationship between structural racism, inequity and health. She has a particular focus on the child and public health impacts of harmful policing practices and policies. She serves as the Chief Medical Officer of San Diego 211, working with navigators to address social needs of San Diegans impacted by chronic illness and poverty. And she is the Director of Equity and Justice for The California Children's Trust, an initiative to advance mental health access to children and youth across California. Dr. Boyd graduated cum laude with a B.A. in Africana Studies and Health from the University of Notre Dame. She earned a M.D. at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at University of California, San Francisco. In 2017, Dr. Boyd graduated from the Commonwealth Fund Mongan Minority Health Policy Fellowship at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, earning a Master of Public Health.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Raising the Bar: On Racism, Health and Publication Standards

Racism is a root cause of racial health inequities. Yet researchers and journals publish on racial health inequities without mentioning or examining racism. How do we raise this bar?

NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo RIPHI Rhode Island Public Health Institute Logo   

NCHEC CHES Logo


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health faculty, authors, publishers, reviewers, organizations and practitioners who rely on public health publications
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: November 19, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_11192020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Dr. Boyd will explore racism as a root cause of racial health inequities. Given this foundation, she will issue a challenge to researchers, journals, reviewers, and readers to engage racism within their analysis of racial health inequities.


What you'll learn

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • List 2 concrete ways racism impacts health
  • Analyze racial disparities emerging during the US COVID19 pandemic and the racial disparities evidenced by disproportionate police violence, within the history of racism in the US
  • Propose new publication standards that engage racism as a root cause of racial health inequities


Subject Matter Expert

  • Rhea Boyd
    Rhea Boyd MD, MPH

    Pediatrician, Public Health Advocate, and Scholar

  • Rhea Boyd MD, MPH is a pediatrician, public health advocate, and scholar who writes and teaches on the relationship between structural racism, inequity and health. She has a particular focus on the child and public health impacts of harmful policing practices and policies. She serves as the Chief Medical Officer of San Diego 211, working with navigators to address social needs of San Diegans impacted by chronic illness and poverty. And she is the Director of Equity and Justice for The California Children's Trust, an initiative to advance mental health access to children and youth across California.

    Dr. Boyd graduated cum laude with a B.A. in Africana Studies and Health from the University of Notre Dame. She earned a M.D. at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at University of California, San Francisco. In 2017, Dr. Boyd graduated from the Commonwealth Fund Mongan Minority Health Policy Fellowship at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, earning an M.P.H.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional professionals serving communities of concern
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 23, 2020
    11:00 - 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:  If you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour and the contact hour(s) for this course may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. You may want to check with your credentialing body if you’re unsure if this course meets its continuing education requirements.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Participants will explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and this new moment in the civil rights movement for Black lives through a lens of trauma-informed care. The workshop will cover self- and community care, self-reflection for allyship and liberation, and resiliency-building through a lens of racial and gender justice.



What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify tools for self- and community care to help sustain health workers in a critical time
  • Name Principles of Trauma-Informed Care and some ways they can be applied to daily work with colleagues and clients/ patients
  • Think about how to hold trauma-informed, healing-centered space to talk about some of the major changes happening in our society right now.
  • Deepen a self-reflection practice for resiliency-building and improved collaboration.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Samantha Calero
    Samantha Calero
  • Samantha Isabel Calero (Sam, she/her) is a biracial Latinx public health consultant. Her work includes training and facilitation, technical assistance, policy analysis and development and organizational capacity building to address trauma, resiliency, racial and gender justice. She approaches her work with an intersectional, margins-to-center lens of relationship building and critical analysis for change. Sam is a member of Mijente and currently is completing her master's degree in health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She lives in Roxbury with her daughter.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

About this Webinar

Instead of an all-or-nothing approach to risk prevention, we need an approach that allows people to live their lives while reducing their risk.  What does harm reduction look like for the coronavirus?


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the principles of harm reduction as a public health approach
  • Apply the principle of harm reduction to the current COVID -19 pandemic
  • Discuss the intersection of harm reduction and institutional racism

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Linette Liebling, MSPH

Linette Liebling, MSPH, has worked as a Public Health educator for over three decades. Ms. Liebling trains CHWs, clinic and hotline counselors, case managers, school health educators, youth workers, and other community health educators on strategies of behavior change as well as various sexual health topics. She is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Psychology Department at Wheaton College where she has taught since 2006.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

How Do We Train for Health Equity? Lessons from Health Equity Coordinator, Tacoma, WA

How has a leading health department trained to integrate health equity into its programming and planning?

Tacoma-Pierce Health Department Logo    NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center LogoPHTC Public Health Training Center Logo

 NCHEC CHES Logo


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, community professionals wishing to increase health equity, trainers, training planners, managers and leaders who can arrange training, workforce development teams, community health workers
  • Format: Self-paced video from live training
  • Date/Time:
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 6 part series - 1 hour of video
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:SS1131137_HWTHE.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings Introduction to Systems Thinking
    Thinking Lobbying and Advocacy: A Primer for NH Non-Profit Advocates
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Webinar

See the highlights of a joint NEPHTC (Public Health) Advisory Committee, SHIELD (School Health) Advisory Committee meeting in which met with community partners to learn and consider “How Do We Train for Health Equity?” Leading the training was Jacques Colon, Health Equity Coordinator of the Tacoma-Pierce Health Department in Washington. Jacques provides an overview of health equity and gives examples from TPHD’s work in training and implementing health equity in programs and functions.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the difference between Health Disparity and Health Inequity
  • Identify a resource that can help a health department define its health equity needs
  • Describe Tacoma Pierce Health Department’s consultative approach to supporting health equity in programs

Subject Matter Expert

  • Jacques Colon
    Jacques Colon
    Health Equity Coordinator,
    Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department
  • Jacques Colon has served as the for the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department for the past three years, where he leads their Health Equity Initiative. This role includes leading the health department’s internal 10-person Health Equity Implementation Team, which is charged with improving the structures, processes, and practices of the health department in order to eliminate health inequities in Pierce County, WA.



    Registration and Contact Hours

    Select the Enroll button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact trainingmanager@nephtc.org.

    The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the webinar. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 17, 2022, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBA
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Communication Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The health of populations is shaped by politics and policies that create the world around us. Elections have real consequences for public health, making voting a central pillar of our community efforts towards creating a better, healthier world. America is Calling. Vote! is an effort to encourage voters under 35 to vote in the upcoming midterm elections. Join us for a conversation between BUSPH Board Member John Rosenthal and March for Our Lives leader David Hogg on the importance of voting and the responsibility of public health to promote voter engagement.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the mission and importance of the effort, America is Calling. Vote!
  • Discuss the impact that young voters can have on democracy and freedom in the U.S.
  • Discuss the correlation between voter turnout and positive change in past elections.
  • Recommend strategies for discussing politics with people who have opposing views.


Moderator

  • Craig Andrade

    Craig Andrade
    @DRCRAIGANDRADE
    Associate Dean for Practice, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Craig Andrade is Associate Dean of Practice and Director of the Activist Lab at Boston University’s School of Public Health (SPH) where he is serves to catalyze and encourage SPH’s public health practice portfolio locally and globally among all members of the school community, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community partners. He is also a member of the Dean’s Cabinet and the Governing Council and chairs the school’s permanent practice committee. Previously Dr. Andrade was the Director of the Bureau of Family Health & Nutrition (BFHN) at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH). BFHN’s programs include Early Intervention (EI), Pregnancy, Infancy and Early Childhood, Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program, Home Visiting, Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, Breastfeeding Initiative, Birth Defects Surveillance, Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program, the Office of Data Translation and Birth Defects Research and Prevention. He also served as Director of the Division of Health Access at DPH, helped found the Racial Equity Leadership Team and Cross-Department Racial Equity Collaborative at DPH and was Associate Dean of Health and Wellness and Director of Student Health Services at Wheaton College in Norton, MA. He served as critical care, public health and ward nurse at Boston Medical Center; nurse manager and head athletic trainer at Buckingham Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, MA; and was owner/operator of Active Health, a private health and fitness company. Craig is a registered nurse, athletic trainer, licensed massage therapist and strength and condition specialist with masters and doctoral degrees in public health from Boston University. His research interests include behavioral risk management and resilience-building among children, adolescents and young adults.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • John Rosenthal

      John Rosenthal
      @JOHNROSENTHAL_
      Founder, Stop Handgun Violence; President, Meredith Management


    • John Rosenthal is the President of Meredith Management. He is a successful real estate developer and manager in Massachusetts who has distinguished himself in his ability to balance corporate and individual responsibility. John is also very active in community based environmental and renewable energy issues as well as social and economic justice. He has organized and advocated extensively in support of safe and renewable energy and against nuclear power and weapons. In February 2022, John partnered with world renowned branding and creative designer, Bruce Mau, and the Massive Change Network to create the America is Calling – VOTE! initiative to rebrand democracy and freedom in America by countering the voter suppression efforts and motivating Americans to vote to help save Democracy.

    • David Hogg

      David Hogg
      @DAVIDHOGG11

      Co-founder,
      March for our Lives


    • Thrust into the world of activism by the largest school shooting in American history, Parkland survivor David Hogg has become one of the most compelling voices of his generation. His call to “get over politics and get something done” challenges Americans to stand up, speak out and work to elect morally just leaders, regardless of party affiliation. Passionate in his advocacy to end gun violence, David’s mission of increasing voter participation, civic engagement and activism embraces a range of issues.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 24, 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:TBA
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Approximately 4 million women give birth each year in the U.S. Yet, traditional public health approaches have continued to consider maternal and child health together. How do we put the needs of mothers at the heart of public health? And how do we ensure attention to the health of all persons who give birth?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the limited reproductive choices that black women, women of color, and immigrant women have due to structural racism.
  • Define reproductive justice and discuss the right of all people to have or not have children under safe conditions.
  • Discuss the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare for achieving reproductive autonomy.
  • Analyze the role popular visual culture has in depicting the fetus and the pregnant body.
  • Assess the maternal mental health difficulties during the perinatal period and identify the impacts this has on fetal health.
  • Discuss how campaigns and interventions used in the UK can be applied to the U.S. to improve maternal mental health outcomes.


Moderator

  • Priyanka Dayal McCluskey

    Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
    @PRIYANKA_DAYAL
    Senior Health Reporter, WBUR

  • Priyanka Dayal McCluskey is a senior health reporter for WBUR, Boston’s NPR news station. Her work airs on the radio and appears online at WBUR.org. Before joining WBUR in 2022, she spent eight years as a health care reporter at The Boston Globe. She previously covered health and medicine at the Boston Herald. She began her career writing local news for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. Priyanka’s coverage spans health business and policy, medical research, and health disparities. She is focused on how the health care system serves — and doesn’t serve — patients. Her recent work chronicles the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients, workers, and the health care system. She is a co-author of WBUR’s CommonHealth newsletter. Priyanka has a B.S. in Journalism and a B.A. in Political Science from Boston University.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Marcela Howell

      Marcela Howell
      @BLACKWOMENSRJ
      President; CEO, In Our Own Voice: National Black Women's Reproductive Justice Agenda


    • Marcela Howell is the president & CEO of In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda, a national-state partnership with eight Black women’s Reproductive Justice organizations with a goal of lifting up the voices of Black leaders on reproductive rights, health and justice. An advocate and policy strategist, Marcela is recognized for her expertise in strategic communications, leadership development and policy forecasting. With over 40 years of experience advocating for reproductive justice and women’s empowerment, she is devoted to enhancing the role of Black women in national policy debates on issues that impact their lives. Marcela has testified before Congress on abortion access, reproductive rights and justice and the empowerment of Black women and has been quoted in numerous publications, including Newsweek, Washington Post, Ms. Magazine, Blavity, and Essence Magazine. Marcela is the author of Walk in My Shoes: A Black Activist’s Guide to Surviving the Women’s Movement, a collection of inspirational essays to help young Black women navigate the women’s movement and empower them to become leaders in the fight for reproductive justice.

    • May Sudhinaraset

      May Sudhinaraset
      @UCLAFSPH
      Associate Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health


    • Dr. May Sudhinaraset, PhD is an Associate Professor in Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at UCLA. She is trained as a social epidemiologist from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on understanding the social determinants of migrant, adolescent, and women’s health both globally and in the US. Her work centers around three complementary streams of work: (1) social and cultural contexts of vulnerable adolescents and women; (2) global women’s health and quality of service delivery; and (3) social policies and immigration in the US. Her global work includes women’s experiences during childbirth, family planning, and abortion services, development of quality improvement interventions in Kenya and India, and large-scale maternal and child health evaluations in Myanmar. She currently is Principal Investigator of the BRAVE Study (Bridging communities Raising API Voices for health Equity), the first study to assess the health status and health care utilization of undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander young adults. Using community participatory approaches, this study explores the impact of social policies, including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, on the social and health outcomes of undocumented young adults. She has collaborated with institutions and researchers in Myanmar, Kenya, India, Thailand and China.

    • Monica McLemore

      Monica McLemore
      @MCLEMOREMR

      Professor, Interim Director, Center for Anti-Racism in Nursing University of Washington, School of Nursing

    • Dr. Monica R. McLemore is a tenured professor in the Child, Family, and Population Health Department and the Interim Director for the Center for Anti-Racism in Nursing at the University of Washington School of Nursing. Prior to her arrival at UW, she was a tenured associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco and was named the Thelma Shobe Endowed Chair in 2021. She retired from clinical practice as a public health and staff nurse after a 28-year clinical nursing career in 2019, however, continues to provide flu and COVID-19 vaccines. Her program of research is focused on understanding reproductive health and justice. To date, she has 93 peer reviewed articles, OpEds and commentaries and her research has been cited in the Huffington Post, Lavender Health, five amicus briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States, and three National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine reports, and a data visualization project entitled How To Fix Maternal Mortality: The first step is to stop blaming women that was published in the 2019 Future of Medicine edition of Scientific American. Her work has also appeared in publications such as Dame Magazine, Politico, ProPublica/NPR and she made a voice appearance in Terrance Nance’s HBO series Random Acts of Flyness. She is the recipient of numerous awards and currently serves as chair for Sexual and Reproductive Health section of the American Public Health Association. She was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 2019. She became the Editor in Chief of Health Equity Journal in 2022.

    • Elizabeth Armstrong

      Elizabeth Armstrong
      @PRINCETON

      Head of Butler College, Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Princeton University

    • Elizabeth M Armstrong is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology with joint affiliations in The Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the Office of Population Research. Her research interests include public health, the history and sociology of medicine, risk in obstetrics, and medical ethics. She is currently conducting research on diseases and agenda-setting, and on fetal personhood and the evolution of obstetrical practice and ethics. She is the author or coauthor of articles in Health Affairs, Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Marriage and the Family, International Family Planning Perspectives, and Studies in Family Planning and is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003). She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan from 1998-2000. Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.

    • Fiona Challacombe

      Fiona Challacombe
      @DRFIONACH

      NIHR Clinical
      Lecturer,
      Kings College London


    • Dr. Challacombe qualified as a clinical psychologist from the IOPPN, King’s College London in 2005. After working in clinical practice she gained a Peggy Pollak research fellowship from the Psychiatry Research Trust and completed a PhD at King’s College London in 2014. Her research examined the impact of perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder on women and children. She conducted the first randomised controlled trial of CBT for postpartum OCD, investigating treatment effects on anxiety and parenting. She joined the Section of Women’s Mental Health at the IOPPN in 2017 and gained an NIHR fellowship to investigate treatments for perinatal anxiety disorders in 2018. She is a senior clinician at the Maudsley Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma (CADAT) where she has developed and leads a sub-service for parents with anxiety disorders. She is author of the self-help book Break Free from OCD and a therapist treatment manual CBT for OCD.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Abolition, Incarceration, and the Public’s Health

Recently, the issue of prison reform has been gaining national attention, forcing policymakers to rethink the issue. As momentum grows to call for change, how does public health play a role in ending mass incarceration and reforming a criminal justice system?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo   NCHEC CHES Logo      

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, September 28, 2022, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_09282022
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The United States is the most incarcerated nation in the world. Decades of harmful policies have led to overcrowded prisons and a broken criminal justice system, leading to prison populations that are disproportionately poor and people of color. Recently, the issue of prison reform has been gaining national attention, forcing policymakers to rethink the issue. As momentum grows to call for change, how does public health play a role in ending mass incarceration and reforming a criminal justice system?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how housing can be a point of intervention to reduce the risk of incarceration
  • Describe the abolitionist approach to end cycles of incarceration
  • Compare community violence intervention and alternative community first responder programs to the criminal justice system approach currently in place in the United States
  • Give examples of courses that can train public health students to understand and develop strategies to address mass criminalization and mass incarceration 
  • Discuss how an integrated advocacy approach, using public health research, can support abolishment of major systems of oppression


Moderator

  • Deborah Douglas

    Deborah Douglas
    @DEBOFFICIALLY

    Co-Editor in Chief, The Emancipator

  • DEBORAH D. DOUGLAS is co-editor in chief of The Emancipator. She previously served as the Eugene S. Pulliam Distinguished Visiting Professor at DePauw University, senior leader with The OpEd Project, amplifying underrepresented expert voices, and founding managing editor of MLK50: Justice Through Journalism. While teaching at Northwestern University, she spearheaded a graduate investigative journalism capstone on the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and taught best practices in Karachi, Pakistan. Douglas’ adventures in thought leadership were seeded at the Chicago Sun-Times where she served as Deputy Editorial Page Editor/Columnist. Deborah is author of the “U.S. Civil Rights Trail: A Traveler’s Guide to the People, Places, and Events That Made the Movement” (Moon, 2021), the first-ever travel guide to follow the official civil rights trail in the South, and a contributor to “Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019” (OneWorld, 2021). Among her many recognitions, she received Chicago’s prestigious Studs Terkel Award and the Society of American Travel Writers 2021 Guidebook of the Year.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Angela Aidala

      Angela Aidala
      @COLUMBIAMSPH
      Associate Research Scientist, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health


    • Angela A. Aidala, Ph.D., is a Research Scientist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences. Her major interest is research, teaching, and service delivery strategies to work effectively with harder to reach or ‘hidden’ populations in urban settings crucial to understanding health disparities: disadvantaged and socially marginalized youth and adults challenged by unstable housing/ homeless experience, mental illness, substance use, and/or criminal justice involvement. She is committed to applied research — working with community members, policy makers, service providers, and advocates to translate research to inform policy and program decision making. Dr. Aidala currently leads a 10 year follow-up of a demonstration project that brought together multiple governmental agencies (Corrections, Homeless Services, Health), housing providers, and community stakeholders for a housing-based intervention for adults with complex needs and histories of cycling in and out of incarceration, homelessness, and crisis health care institutions – the Frequent Users Services Engagement (FUSE) initiative. Documented success of the original project has inspired multiple jurisdictions throughout the US to launch similar efforts. The FUSE long term follow-up study analyzes the role of stable housing as a critical component of successful community reentry, not just in the short term but considering impacts over the life course. We examine longitudinal trajectories among multiple life domains –incarceration, housing, and health – analyzing interdependencies and policy and institutional contexts.

    • Dana Rice

      Dana Rice
      @DKRICEDRPH

      Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health 

    • Dana Rice, DrPH, assistant professor, is a public health practitioner and researcher who examines best practices in public health leadership and community engagement with a health equity, social justice and human rights lens. Her primary focus is on the integration of public health and correctional health systems and the impact of mass criminalization and mass incarceration on public health. She was a recipient of the student-nominated Award for Excellence in Teaching and Innovation, the peer-nominated Delta Omega Faculty Award and a UNC Equity in Teaching fellow. Prior to joining the faculty at Gillings, Dr. Rice spent 20 years working in the public, private and non-profit sectors. Her most recent work was dedicated to designing, implementing and evaluating an HIV/STD screening program in a large urban jail and training graduate public health and medical students in translating applied public health practice skills to a variety of community settings.

    • Insha Rahman

      Insha Rahman
      @VERAINSTITUTE

      Vice President of Vera Action, Vice President of Advocacy and Partnerships

    • Insha Rahman is Vice President for Advocacy and Partnerships at the Vera Institute of Justice and Vice President of Vera Action, Vera’s 501c4 sister organization. She leads the development of Vera and Vera Action’s advocacy priorities and campaigns across the organization, partnering with government, advocates, and organizers to win policy change to end mass incarceration and build safe, thriving communities for all. Insha is a nationally recognized expert on bail reform and pretrial justice. In addition to overseeing Vera and Vera Action’s advocacy priorities, she supervises the organization’s place-based initiatives in California, Louisiana, and New York. She has been quoted as an expert in several outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, and PBS. Prior to joining Vera, she was a public defender at The Bronx Defenders. She graduated with a BA in Africana Studies from Vassar College and earned her J.D. from the City University of New York School of Law.

    • Emile DeWeaver

      Emile DeWeaver

      @PRSNRENAISSANCE

      Author; Co-founder,
      Prison  Renaissance

    • Emile is an African-American activist whose life sentence in prison was commuted by California’s Governor Brown after 21 years for his community work in prison. While in prison, he was a culture writer for Easy Street Magazine; he co-founded Prison Renaissance, and despite the criminalization of organizing in California prisons, he covertly organized in prison to pass legislation that changed the way California treats juveniles in its criminal legal system. Currently Emile holds workshops on abolitionist strategies to develop policy and programs, and he’s working on his memoir for The New Press titled Ghost in the Prison Industrial Machine.

    • Zal Shroff

      Zal Shroff
      @LCCRSF
      Senior Attorney, Racial Justice, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights


    • Zal is a Senior Staff Attorney on the Racial Justice team. Prior to joining LCCRSF, Zal was a Clinical Lecturer-in-Law at Yale Law School where he worked with students to improve ballot access for incarcerated individuals and supervised litigation against the federal Bureau of Prisons for its response to the pandemic. Before that, Zal was a Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Kansas where he worked on a variety of civil rights cases spanning conditions of confinement, prosecutorial/police accountability, voting rights, race and religious discrimination, and First Amendment issues. Immediately after law school, Zal was the Clifford Chance Foundation Fellow at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he worked on non-profit in-house regulatory and compliance matters, and spearheaded a project on accessing state financial aid dollars for college in prison programs nationwide. Zal is a graduate of Brown University and received his JD from Columbia Law School. He is admitted to practice in New York, Connecticut, and Kansas, and is an MJP Registered Legal Aid Attorney in the State of California.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Annual Shine Lecture: Sheri Fink - Patient Rights in Emergencies: The Right to Treatment and the Right to Refuse Treatment.

Who should be part of the decision-making process for medical care allocation in an emergency? What is the appropriate role for the patients themselves? Who gets to make the final decision?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 13th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_ASLPRE.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Boston University School of Public Health’s Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights presents the annual Cathy Shine lecture. The lectureship honors the memory of Cathy Shine and her dedication to the rights of all those in need of care. This year’s event will feature author and filmmaker Sherri Fink. Her best-selling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital focused on the tough choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is also the co-creator and executive producer of the Emmy-nominated documentary series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common challenges to medical ethics and health equity
  • Discuss ethical framework for how to prioritize allocation of medical care in a crisis
  • Discuss the elements of a just decision-making process
  • Assess lessons learned from experience in 3 real-life cases (Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, COVID-19)

Moderator

  • George Annas

    George Annas
    @GEORGEJANNAS

     William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health


  • George J. Annas is William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University and Director of the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights at Boston University School of Public Health, and a member of the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at the School of Public Health. He is also a Professor at the School of Law and School of Medicine. He is author or editor of 20 books on health law and bioethics, including The Rights of Patients (3d ed 2004), Public Health Law (2d ed 2014), American Bioethics (2005), Worst Case Bioethics (2010), and Genomic Messages (2015). He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the co-founder of Global Lawyers & Physicians, a NGO dedicated to promoting health and human rights.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Sheri Fink

      Sheri Fink
      @SHERIFINK

      Author, Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

    • Sheri Fink is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital about choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is a co-creator and an executive producer of the Emmy-nominated Netflix documentary television series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak (2020), filmed the year prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. Fink contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the pandemic. Her and her colleagues’ stories on Ebola in West Africa were recognized with the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the George Polk Award for health reporting, and the Overseas Press Club Hal Boyle Award. Her story “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” co-published by ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine, received a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and a National Magazine Award for reporting. Fink is an adjunct associate professor at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. A former relief worker in disaster and conflict zones, she received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her first book, War Hospital: A True Story of Surgery and Survival (PublicAffairs), is about medical professionals under siege during the genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Five Days at Memorial was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for nonfiction, the Ridenhour Book Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Book Award, the American Medical Writers Association Medical Book Award, and the NASW Science in Society Journalism Book Award.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Challenging Public Health: Michelle Holder

How did COVID highlight and exacerbate economic and employment conditions disproportionately among women and persons of color? What can we learn to change those conditions as we move forward?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 5th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CPHMH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Our Challenging Public Health series invites speakers from outside of public health to reflect on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This conversation features Michelle Holder, President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. Holder’s research focuses primarily on how the US job market discriminates against people of color, particularly Black women, who not only face a gender wage gap but a racial wage gap. She has written extensively on this subject, including The ‘Double Gap’ and the Bottom Line: African American Women’s Wage Gap and Corporate Profits, and more recently The Early Impact of Covid-19 on Job losses among Black Women in the United States.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the public health system underperformed during COVID from policy and political perspectives
  • Discuss evidence for disparate effects of COVID on job loss and negative economic effects across gender, race, and class lines
  • Discuss lessons learned to improve public health response to combat more effectively the disparate outcomes of COVID along racial and ethnic lines


Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Rebecca Traister

      Michelle Holder
      @MLHOLDER999

      President of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth; Associate Professor of Economics, John Jay College, City University of New York
    • Michelle Holder is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth as well as Associate Professor of Economics at John Jay College, City University of New York. Prior to joining the John Jay College faculty, she worked as an applied economist for a decade in both the nonprofit and government sectors. Her research focuses on the Black community and women of color in the American labor market, and her economic policy reports have been covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Amsterdam News, El Diario, and Dollars & Sense magazine. Michelle has also appeared on, or been quoted in, media outlets such as CNN, the Washington Post, NPR, The New Yorker, Black News Channel (BNC), PBS, MSNBC, Al Jazeera-English, Marketplace, and Vox.com. Her second book, Afro-Latinos in the U.S. Economy, co-authored with Alan Aja, was released May 2021 by Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield. Michelle received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from The New School for Social Research, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Fordham University.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


The Health Consequences of War

How can an understanding of the range of war’s effects on refugees allow public health and healthcare practitioners in the US to provide appropriate and effective care for wartime refugees in our communities?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 29th, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HCW
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

As the war in Ukraine unfolds, the world is beginning to bear witness to the consequences being experienced by the Ukrainian people. This Conversation brings together experts who have studied other conflicts to discuss what we know about the long-term effects of war on the health of populations.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the effects of war on the mental health of children, youth, and families and types of interventions that have shown to be effective in addressing those effects
  • Describe the challenges to and lessons learned from providing nutritional support and medical care to persons in the Syrian conflict
  • Discuss the impact of violence on health care providers and facilities in Ukraine, as well as historical experience of prior conflicts (Afghanistan, sub-Saharan Africa)
  • Compare and contrast effects of conventional warfare (effects on battlefield relatively well understood) vs. “hybrid” warfare (effects on civilians and society; medical consequences unknown)

Moderator

  • Tiziana Dearing

    Tiziana Dearing
    @TIZIANA_DEARING

    Host, WBUR’s Radio Boston

  • Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston on WBUR. She’s been a commentator and contributor to WBUR for more than a decade, and has contributed to a number of other regional and national news outlets. Prior to joining the Radio Boston team, Tiziana was a professor at Boston College in the School of Social Work, where she taught social innovation and leadership. A longtime anti-poverty advocate, Tiziana also ran Boston Rising, a startup antipoverty fund to end generational poverty in Boston, and was the first woman president of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Boston. She’s won a number of awards in the city, including a Pinnacle Award from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Theresa Betancourt

      Theresa Betancourt

      Salem Professor
      in Global Practice,
      Boston College

    • Theresa S. Betancourt is the inaugural Salem Professor in Global Practice at the Boston College School of Social Work and Director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her primary research interest is to understand the protective processes that contribute to risk and resilience in the mental health and development of children and adolescents facing adversity in a variety of cultures and settings. Dr. Betancourt has led several initiatives to adapt and test evidence-based behavioral and parenting interventions for children, youth, and families facing adversity due to poverty, illness, and violence. Dr. Betancourt additionally focuses on strategies for scaling out these interventions using implementation science approaches. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Dr. Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence that can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in Rwanda. In the US, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. through the collaborative development and evaluation of parenting programs led by refugees for refugees that can be linked to prevention services involving refugee community health workers. Dr. Betancourt has served on the advisory board for the 2021 UNICEF State of the World’s Children report, titled, “On My Mind: Promoting, Protecting, and Caring for Children’s Mental health.” Additionally, she has advised Amnesty International on a key advocacy report on mental health in Sierra Leone entitled ““They are forgetting about us:” The Long-term mental health impact of war and Ebola in Sierra Leone.” Dr. Betancourt serves on a high-level World Health Organization Mental Health Gap Topic Expert Group (TEG), the Lancet Commission on Gender Based Violence and Maltreatment of Young People, as well as serve as a thematic advisor for the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) for a series of workshops on Violent Extremist Disengagement, Reconciliation, Trauma Recovery. Dr. Betancourt has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com, and in an interview with Larry King on the program, “PoliticKing.”

    • Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Doctor & Research Associate, King's College, London

    • Dr. AbdulKarim Ekzayez is a Syrian medical doctor specializing in epidemiology and health systems. His current work at King’s College focuses on health systems strengthening in conflict areas and on building the research and policy capacity of the health sector in conflict-affected areas of the Middle East. He is currently a lead applicant for a large project funded by the National Institute for Health Research called “Research for Health System Strengthening in Northern Syria R4HSSS”. He is also involved in several other projects and research with other academic and policy institutes including LSHTM, AUB, Chatham House and others. His research focuses on issues related to health system building in conflict settings and early recovery, health care protection challenges, and the health impact of conflict. In 2013, Karim was training to be a neurosurgeon when his residency was interrupted by the war. He joined Save the Children in North West Syria, where he led the health response until 2017 – helping build the primary health care system, restarting routine vaccinations, and supporting the rebuilding of the health system in northern Syria using a bottom up approach. Dr. Ekzayez is a regular contributor to several medical and civil society institutions in Syria, and has been active in advocacy for Syria through media and conferences. He is a trustee member of two NGOs, Shafak and Refugee Trauma Initiative and a managing director of the Syrian British Council which is a lobbying and advocacy body in the UK. He received his MD from Aleppo University and his MSc from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Also, he completed a one-year residential fellowship on leadership in international affairs from The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs at Chatham House; and another one-year fellowship in international cultural relations from the Institute for International Cultural Relations at The University of Edinburgh. He is also pursuing his PhD in public policy from King’s College London.

    • Larissa Fast

      Larissa Fast

      Doctor, Humanitarian and Conflict Studies, University of Manchester

    • Professor Fast is working at the intersection of the worlds of academia, policy, and practice. Her research addresses two fundamental problems: how best to protect civilians, particularly those who intervene in violent conflict, and how to make such intervention more effective, ethical, and responsive to local needs and circumstances. In addition to her book Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism, she has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and policy reports. Professor Fast worked for both government and non-government agencies as a project manager, consultant, and analyst, and provided training to individuals and organizations in peace building and conflict analysis. Prior to her current position at Manchester, she was a Senior Research Fellow at ODI’s Humanitarian Policy Group, a Fulbright-Schuman Research Scholar (2016-2017), and a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow (2014-2016) at USAID’s Global Development Lab. She has also held faculty positions at the Kroc Institute at the University of Notre Dame (USA) and Conrad Grebel University College (University of Waterloo, Canada).

    • Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Doctor & Senior University Lecturer, University of Gothenburg

    • Dr. Khorram-Manesh serves as university lecturer in surgery with particular focus on disaster medicine, mass casualty management and trauma. He is also a Visiting professor at numerous universities, currently the National Institute of Emergency Medicine of Thailand and Mahidol University in Bangkok. He has published over 100 papers, book chapters and books. His current research interests are in multiagency collaboration in emergencies, introduction of the Flexible Surge Capacity concept, Civilian-Military collaboration and its related challenges, development of emergency medicine in middle and low-income countries, hospital safety in disasters and public health emergencies. He is equally active in introduction of educational initiatives such as simulation trainings and exercises within the field of disaster and emergency medicine.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Travel Restrictions During Pandemics: Considerations and Consequences

Have the benefits of implementing cross-border travel bans aimed at containing the spread of disease outweighed the potential adverse effects on limiting the availability of health workers, the increase of xenophobia, and use based on political motivations rather than potential for improving public health?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 1st, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_TRDPCC.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Cross-border travel bans have long been controversial in public health. While travel bans may help contain disease spread, there are also concerns that they may limit the availability of health workers where needed, and that they may encourage xenophobia. During the COVID-19 pandemic, travel bans were implemented widely by many countries (U.S. included), in an effort to contain the virus and control its spread. But how effective were they in suppressing the spread? Is it fair to look at the effectiveness of these bans without considering if they do more harm than good? Dr. William J. Bicknell endowed this lectureship to support excellence, rigor, imagination and risk-taking in the teaching and practice of public health through annual lectures.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the legal right to restrict travel in the United States and its potential for misuse
  • Describe the legal framework and principles that can provide structure for decision making about international travel restrictions in times of uncertainty
  • Discuss the evidence for the effectiveness of travel restrictions in decreasing the transmission of disease and reducing risk
  • Discuss the evidence for the role of COVID testing and vaccines in travel restrictions
  • Describe lessons learned about quarantine, isolation, and travel restrictions from the historical example of yellow fever

Moderator

  • Sharmila Devi

    Sharmila Devi
    @SHARMILADEVI2

    Writer and Editor

  • Sharmila Devi is a writer and editor with more than 25 years’ experience working for international agencies, newspapers and consultancies. She was a correspondent in the Middle East and Africa, including more than five years as the Jerusalem correspondent for the Financial Times during the second intifada, and has reported developments in politics, economics, global health and climate change. She also worked in New York as correspondent for the UAE-based National newspaper and in Iraqi Kurdistan as a correspondent for the English-language service of the local media network Rudaw during the conflict with ISIS. She writes and edits major reports for NGOs such as Unicef and for political risk consultancies about politics and global health. She is a long-standing contributor to the world report pages of The Lancet, writing about global health issues, conflict and humanitarian crises. She covered the COVID-19’s impact around the world, including how travel restrictions hampered the global response to the pandemic.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Sondra Crosby

      Sondra Crosby
      @SONDRACROSBY16

      Associate Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health

    • Sondra Crosby, MD is a medical doctor and Professor of Medicine at Boston University, specializing in internal medicine. She is also a faculty member of the Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights department at the Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Crosby is notable for being one of the first doctors allowed to travel to Guantanamo to independently examine Guantanamo captives. She is also notable for serving as the director of medical care at the Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights. She examined over 300 torture victims at the Center. Dr. Crosby is one of the authors of Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by the US, published by Physicians for Human Rights. According to Physicians for Human Rights, Dr. Crosby has “written over 200 affidavits documenting medical and psychological sequelae of torture.”

    • Eskild Petersen

      Eskild Petersen
      @AARHUSUNI_INT

      Professor Emeritus, Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark

    • Professor Eskild Petersen is a Professor Emeritus of Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Aarhus University, Denmark. He chairs the ESCMID Emerging Infections Task Force, Basel, Switzerland. Professor Petersen is internationally renowned for his extensive contributions to global health, therapeutic drug monitoring, multi-drug resistant infections, implant associated infections, travel medicine and emerging infections. Professor Petersen graduated in 1978 from Medical School, University of Aarhus, Denmark; 1980 Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, University of Liverpool; 1985 Specialist Degree in Infectious Diseases; 1988 Specialist Degree in Tropical Medicine; 2002 Master of Business Administration, Copenhagen Business School; 2005 DMSc., Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. He served six years on the board of the ESCMID Study Group on Migration and Travel Medicine, lecturing on immunizations in pregnancy on several ESCMID workshops. Professor Petersen retired from clinical service in June 2020. He is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Infectious Diseases since 2012. Associate editor of Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases. 2010-2018, on the Editorial board of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, American Association of Clinical Microbiology. 2011–2012 Editorial board, Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. 2011 – 2012. 1999 – Co-Editor (Moderator) on parasitic diseases. ProMED (www.promedmail.org). Professor Petersen has published over 350 original papers in peer reviewed journals with an H-index of 53. He has edited several textbooks, including the popular textbooks “Infectious Disease: a Geographic Guide”.

    • Barbara Von Tigerstrom

      Barbara Von Tigerstrom
      @USASKLAW

      Professor, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan

    • Barbara von Tigerstrom is a Professor at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, where she has been a member of faculty since 2005, after working at the University of Alberta Health Law Institute and the University of Canterbury School of Law. She holds a law degree from the University of Toronto and Ph.D. in law from the University of Cambridge. She has received several awards for excellence in teaching and research, and research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Stem Cell Network, among others. Dr. von Tigerstrom’s main areas of teaching and research are health law and policy, information and privacy law, and tort law. Her work in public health examines domestic and international legal issues relating to both infectious and non-communicable diseases. Since March 2020 she has been engaged in a research project funded by the CIHR on the International Health Regulations (IHR) and COVID-19 (with Principal Investigator Dr. Kumanan Wilson and others), with her work focusing on travel restrictions and the IHR. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. von Tigerstrom contributes her expertise to University and external committees including the University of Saskatchewan Biomedical Research Ethics Board and the Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan.

    • Samantha Vanderslott

      Samantha Vanderslott
      @SJVANDERS
      University Research Lecturer at Oxford Vaccine Group, University of Oxford

    • Samantha Vanderslott is a University Research Lecturer at the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford working on health, society, and policy topics. Her current projects are about: policies for neglected tropical diseases; outbreak response; a history of typhoid fever; and attitudes to vaccines. She draws on perspectives from sociology, anthropology, history, global health, and science and technology studies (STS).

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II

How can public health practitioners work with community partners to address underlying causes (social determinants) of trauma in their community?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how trauma (interpersonal, collective, cultural, and experience of loss) can be seen as a social determinant of health
  • Explain race and racism as a risk factor for trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Describe prevalence and predictors of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among youth based on results of Maryland Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  • Discuss non-uniform policing practices as a contributor for trauma as a social determinant of health

Moderator

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Jaimie Gradus
    @JAIMIEGRADUS

    MODERATOR Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus’s research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Maryam Jernigan-Noesi

      Maryam Jernigan-Noesi
      @JERNIGMA

      Founder, Jernigan & Associates Psychology and Educational Consulting

    • Addressing the needs of diverse youths, adults, and families has been the primary focus of Dr. Jernigan-Noesi’s work as a clinician and scholar. She recognizes that not all traditional psychological approaches that serve to meet the needs of some, are effective for persons from all backgrounds. Dr. Jernigan-Noesi prides herself on the integration of context, culture, and social factors that may influence health and wellbeing. Clinically, Dr. Jernigan-Noesi has worked alongside a multidisciplinary team of health providers in inpatient and outpatient mental health, community, medical, and academic settings. She has extensive training in pediatric psychology and adolescent health, as well as specialized training in adult and family interventions. Dr. Jernigan maintains a private practice serving a diverse clientele with a range of clinical concerns including, but not limited to: treatment of eating and weight concerns, mood disorders, anxiety, trauma, grief and loss, relational concerns, and career coaching. She also provides couple counseling focused on major life transitions such as, marriage and parenting. Her approach to therapy utilizes an intersectional framework emphasizing the role of identity (e.g., racial identity, sexual identity, gender identity) and culture in mental health and wellbeing.

    • Renee Johnson

      Renee Johnson
      @RENEE_M_JOHNSON

      Associate Professor,
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    • Dr. Renee M. Johnson is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned her MPH and PhD at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and conducted post-doctoral studies at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. At Hopkins, she is core faculty with the Center for Adolescent Health and the Center for Injury Research & Policy. Dr. Johnson has more than 100 publications addressing adolescent health, and is on the editorial board for JAMA Pediatrics. Her areas of expertise include: substance use among adolescents and emerging adults; violence and injury prevention; and evaluating the public health response to the overdose crisis. Much of her work addresses how adversity and social inequity shape behavioral health. She works with behavioral surveillance data (e.g., CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use & Health), as well as with morbidity and mortality data (e.g., State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System, or SUDORS). Dr. Johnson is deeply engaged in training the next generation of public health professionals. She teaches a course on substance use epidemiology and directs a NIDA-funded training program for doctoral and post-doctoral students studying the epidemiology of substance use.

    • Emily Mendenhall

      Emily Mendenhall
      @MENDENHALL_EM

      Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

    • Emily Mendenhall, PhD, MPH is a medical anthropologist and Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She has published widely at the boundaries of anthropology, psychology, medicine, and public health and is the inaugural co-editor-in-chief of Social Science and Medicine—Mental Health. Dr. Mendenhall led a Series of articles in on Syndemics in The Lancet in 2017, and was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology. She has published several books, including Rethinking Diabetes: Entanglements with Trauma, Poverty, and HIV (2019), Syndemic Suffering: Social Distress, Depression, and Diabetes among Mexican Immigrant Women (2012), and Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives (2015). Her newest book is Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji.

    • John Pamplin

      John Pamplin

      @JOHNPAMPLINII

      Assistant Professor
      and Faculty Fellow,
      New York
      University

    • John R. Pamplin II is an “Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow” in the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress and with the Center for Opioid Epidemiology and Policy at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Dr. Pamplin’s research studies the consequences of structural racism and systemic inequity on mental health and substance use outcomes. His program of research includes work identifying the social and structural drivers of racial patterns in DSM diagnosed major depression, as well as work evaluating policy interventions for the opioid crisis in terms of their potential to either alleviate of exacerbate racial inequities in overdose and criminal legal system outcomes. Prior to joining NYU, Dr. Pamplin received his PhD in Epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public health, where he was a predoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology’s National Institute of Mental Health-funded Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program. Upon graduation, Dr. Pamplin received the Bill Jenkins Award (formerly the William Farr Award) for commitment to addressing the causes of social inequalities in health and promise in the field of Epidemiology. Dr. Pamplin also holds an MPH in Epidemiology from Columbia University, as well as a BS in Biology from Morehouse College, and currently serves as President of the Student and Postdoc Committee of the Society for Epidemiologic Research.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.