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Antiracism as Health Policy (Part 3)

Why does intersectionality matter when studying health disparities and how does this relate to COVID susceptibilities among men and women of color?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 7th 2021 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP3. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
    Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 1)
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 2)
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 3: Antiracist policy solutions

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The third panel will conclude our series with examining antiracist policy solutions that are informed by data.

Cohosted with Boston University Center for Antiracist Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the approach and requirements of the Anti-Racism in Public Health Act of 2020, introduced in September 2020
  • Describe three essential elements of antiracist health policy solutions
  • Discuss importance of intersectional antiracism research and practice
  • Discuss lessons learned from the COVID experience in New York City about an antiracist approach to public health emergencies
  • Describe a framework for advancing health equity through policies for care delivery and payment reform

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

  • Ibram Kendi

    Ibram Kendi
    @dribram

    Director andFounder,
    Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

  • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

  • Elizabeth Warren

    Elizabeth Warren
    @senwarren

    (OPENING CONVERSATION)
    U.S. Senate, Massachusetts

  • Elizabeth Warren, a fearless consumer advocate who has made her life’s work the fight for middle class families, was elected to the United States Senate on November 6, 2012, by the people of Massachusetts. Elizabeth is recognized as one of the nation’s top experts on bankruptcy and the financial pressures facing middle class families, and the Boston Globe has called her “the plainspoken voice of people getting crushed by so many predatory lenders and under regulated banks.” She is widely credited for the original thinking, political courage, and relentless persistence that led to the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. President Obama asked her to set up the new agency to hold Wall Street banks and other financial institutions accountable, and to protect consumers from financial tricks and traps often hidden in mortgages, credit cards and other financial products. In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, Warren served as Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). Her independent and tireless efforts to protect taxpayers, to hold Wall Street accountable, and to ensure tough oversight of both the Bush and Obama Administrations won praise from both sides of the aisle. The Boston Globe named Elizabeth Warren Bostonian of the Year and TIME Magazine called her a “New Sheriff of Wall Street” for her oversight efforts. During her campaign for the Senate, Elizabeth promised to fight for middle class families and to make sure that everyone has a fair shot to get ahead. She called for policies that would level the regulatory playing field for small businesses and ensure that everyone – even large and powerful corporations – pays a fair share in taxes and is held accountable for breaking the law. Endorsing Elizabeth’s candidacy, the New Bedford Standard-Times said, “Elizabeth Warren has it right on all the things that matter most to us in SouthCoast and across Massachusetts,” with “principles that without a doubt, promote the well-being of the middle class.” The Boston Globe called Elizabeth “a fierce advocate for the lot of working families, creating educational opportunities, and expanding medical research.” The Springfield Republican said, “We need a voice for working families in Washington again. Elizabeth Warren will give us that voice.” Senator Warren was a law professor for more than 30 years, including nearly 20 years as the Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. The graduating class at Harvard twice recognized her with the Sacks-Freund Award for excellence in teaching. She taught courses on commercial law, contracts, and bankruptcy and wrote more than a hundred articles and ten books, including three national best-sellers, A Fighting Chance, The Two-Income Trap, and All Your Worth. National Law Journal named her one of the Most Influential Lawyers of the Decade, TIME Magazine has named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world four times, and she has been honored by the Massachusetts Women’s Bar Association with the Lelia J. Robinson Award. Elizabeth learned first-hand about the economic pressures facing working families, growing up in a family she says was “on the ragged edge of the middle class.” She got married at 19, and after graduating from college, started teaching in elementary school. Her first baby, a daughter Amelia, was born when Elizabeth was 22. When Amelia was two, Elizabeth started law school. Shortly after she graduated, her son Alex was born. Elizabeth hung out a shingle and practiced law out of her living room, but she soon returned to teaching. Elizabeth is a graduate of the University of Houston and Rutgers School of Law. Elizabeth and her husband Bruce Mann have been married for 38 years and live in Cambridge, Massachusetts with their golden retriever, Bailey. They have three grandchildren.

  • Dustin Duncan

    Dustin Duncan
    @drdustinduncan

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

  • Dustin T. Duncan, ScD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he directs Columbia’s Spatial Epidemiology Lab and co-directs the department’s Social and Spatial Epidemiology Unit. Dr. Duncan is a Social and Spatial Epidemiologist. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men and transgender women of color. His work appears in leading public health, epidemiology, medical, geography, criminology, demography, and psychology journals. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 150 high-impact articles, book chapters and books, and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s recent work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

  • Torian Easterling

    Torian Easterling
    @drtorian

    First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

  • Dr. Easterling serves as the First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH). Dr. Easterling has spent more than 5 years in a senior leadership role at the Health Department. Prior to serving as First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, Dr. Easterling served as Deputy Commissioner of the Center for Health Equity and Community Wellness at the NYC DOHMH, where he oversaw programmatic work focused on reducing overall premature mortality and closing the racial gap on the top leading causes of preventable death. He also served as the Assistant Commissioner of the Department of Health’s Bureau of Brooklyn Neighborhood Health, where he helped advance key programming to address pressing concerns, including maternal deaths and gun violence. Dr. Easterling is a community physician committed to health equity, social justice and movement building to achieve the health outcomes that all people deserve both locally and globally. Dr. Easterling holds a Bachelor of Science from Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) from Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H) from Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York. He completed his residency in Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens, NY and a General Preventive Medicine residency at Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York.

  • Regina Davis Moss

    Regina Davis Moss
    @dr4equity

    (MODERATOR)

    Associate Executive Director, American Public Health Association

  • Regina Davis Moss is the associate executive director of the American Public Health Association. She oversees a broad portfolio of programs addressing the social determinants of health and has nearly 20 years of experience managing national health promotion initiatives addressing health equity, women’s health, and public health system capacity building. Formerly, Dr. Davis Moss held a senior management position for a chronic disease prevention effort for the National Institute of Health. Prior to that, she worked for the Kaiser Family Foundation where she helped launch the Kaiser Health News online information service and served as the senior producer. Dr. Davis Moss came to Kaiser after serving as a supervisor for an epidemiologic study focused on women’s reproductive health. She also served as a public health service fellow in the Office on Women’s Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Davis Moss earned her Ph.D. in Maternal and Child Health from the University of Maryland, College Park; M.P.H. from George Washington University; B.S. from Howard University, and certificate in public health performance improvement from the University of Minnesota.

  • Consuelo H. Wilkins

    Consuelo H. Wilkins
    @drchwilkins

    Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity, Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

  • Consuelo H. Wilkins, MD, MSCI, Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity and Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is a nationally recognized thought leader in health equity and in addressing the elimination of systemic inequities that impact the health and well-being of racial/ethnic minorities. As a community engagement research scientist, Dr. Wilkins has pioneered new approaches to engaging vulnerable, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and minority populations. She is Principal Investigator of three NIH-funded centers, the Vanderbilt-Miami-Meharry Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine and Population Health; the Center for Improving Clinical Trial Education Recruitment and Enrollment at CTSA Hubs; and the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. She is also PI of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation award on engendering trust in health care among African American men. Dr. Wilkins earned a Bachelor of Science in microbiology and Doctor of Medicine from Howard University. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a Geriatric Medicine fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Following her medical training, she earned a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Washington University School of Medicine.

  • >Marshall Chin

    Marshall Chin
    @marshallchinmd

    Chair, Family Medicine,
     Boston University
    School of
    Public Health

  • Marshall Chin, MD, MPH, is a general internist with extensive experience improving the care of vulnerable patients with chronic disease. He has worked to advance diabetes care and outcomes on the South Side through health care system and community interventions. He also leads initiatives to improve health strategies at a national level as director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)’s Finding Answers: Solving Disparities Through Payment and Delivery System Reform Program Office and Co-Director of the Merck Foundation’s Bridging the Gap: Reducing Disparities in Diabetes Care National Program Office. Dr. Chin performed many of the key research studies informing how to improve diabetes care and outcomes in federally-qualified health centers serving vulnerable populations with limited resources. His work over the past decade leading RWJF’s Finding Answers program led to the creation of the Roadmap to Reduce Disparities. Current projects include improving diabetes outcomes in real-world settings, reducing health disparities by transforming the way care is organized and paid for, enhancing care by facilitating partnerships between the health care system and other sectors such as food and housing, and improving shared decision making among clinicians and LGBTQ people of color. In addition to his clinical and research roles, Dr. Chin is a teacher and award-winning mentor, committed to providing opportunities for trainees. As co-director of the Summer Program in Outcomes Research Training (SPORT), Dr. Chin educates faculty, fellows and students about outcomes research methods — to better understand and improve quality of care. An expert in health care disparities in medicine, Dr. Chin frequently is invited to present his work at national conferences and serve on policy committees. He serves on the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities National Advisory Council and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Community Preventive Services Task Force. He co-chairs the National Quality Forum (NQF) Disparities Standing Committee and is a former President of the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM). Dr. Chin was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2017.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Antiracism as Health Policy (Part 2)

What are some of the flaws in using race as a standalone measure of risk?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 6th 2021 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP2. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
    Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 1) 
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 3) 
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 2: Connecting research and policy

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The second panel will focus on linking research to policy.

Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research and the Rockefeller Foundation-Boston University 3-D Commission.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List at least 5 social or health factors that were associated with race and risk of infection, illness, and death from COVID-19
  • Discuss the role of data and analysis in advancing racial equity in the COVID-19 response
  • List 6 areas of research on structural racism being conducted nationally

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health


  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

  • Ibram Kendi

    Ibram Kendi
    @dribram

    Director and
    Founder,
    Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

  • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

  • Ayanna Pressley

    Ayanna Pressley
    @AyannaPressley

    Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine


  • Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley is an activist, a legislator, a survivor, and the first woman of color to be elected to Congress from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Throughout her career as a public servant, Congresswoman Pressley has fought to ensure that those closest to the pain are closest to the power – driving and informing policymaking. Throughout her first term in Congress, Congresswoman Pressley has been a champion for justice: reproductive justice, justice for immigrants, consumer justice, justice for aging Americans, justice for workers, justice for survivors of sexual violence, and justice for the formerly and currently incarcerated. Currently, Congresswoman Pressley serves on two powerful Congressional committees – the House Committee on Oversight and Reform and the House Committee on Financial Services– both of which have remained focused on legislatively addressing issues of care, concern, and consequence to the American people. Prior to being elected to Congress, she served on the Boston City Council for 8 years, and was the first woman of color elected to the council in its 100-year history.

  • Samatha Artiga

    Samantha Artiga
    @sartiga2

    Vice President, Director, Disparities Policy Project, Kaiser Family Foundation


  • Samantha Artiga serves as Vice President and Director of the Racial Equity and Health Policy Program at KFF. In this role, Ms. Artiga leads KFF’s work to provide timely and reliable data, information, and policy analysis on health and health care disparities affecting people of color and underserved groups and efforts to advance racial equity in health and health care. Her work focuses on the intersection of racism and discrimination, social and economic inequities, and health. She also has conducted extensive work related to the health and health care needs of low-income populations and immigrant families and previously served as Associate Director of KFF’s Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Ms. Artiga holds a master’s degree in health policy from the George Washington University.

  • Patricia Williams

    Patricia Williams
    @nusl

    University Distinguished Professor of Law and Humanities, Northeastern University School of Law


  • Professor Williams, one of the most provocative intellectuals in American law and a pioneer of both the law and literature and critical race theory movements in American legal theory, holds a joint appointment between the School of Law and the Department of Philosophy and Religion in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. She is also director of Law, Technology and Ethics Initiatives in the School of Law and the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Professor Williams has published widely in the areas of race, gender, literature and law. Her books, including The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Harvard University Press, 1991), illustrate some of America’s most complex societal problems and challenge our ideas about socio-legal constructs of race and gender. Her work remains at the cutting edge of legal scholarship. Drawing on her prior interrogation of race, gender and personhood, Professor Williams’ current research raises core questions of individual autonomy and identity in the context of legal and ethical debates on science and technology. Her work in the area of health and genetics, for example, questions how racial formation is shaped by the legal regulation of private industry and government. Her work on algorithms grapples with the auditing function of technology in our everyday lives — shaping how we understand who we are.

  • Laura Magaña

    Laura Magaña


    @lauramagvall

    (MODERATOR) President and CEO, Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health

  • Dr. Laura Magaña joined the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) as President and CEO in August 2017. Under Dr. Magaña’s leadership, ASPPH has continued to advance its mission to strengthen the capacity of members by advancing leadership, excellence, and collaboration for academic public health. During her tenure, ASPPH has significantly grown its global engagement, launched the academic public health leadership institute, and enhanced the voice of academic public health through advocacy efforts. Prior to joining ASPPH, Dr. Magaña dedicated more than 35 years to successfully leading the transformation and advancements of public and private universities in Mexico; educational organizations in the USA; United Nations programs; and NGO’s in Central America and Europe. She was most recently the dean of the School of Public Health in Mexico at the ASPPH-member National Institute of Public Health (INSP). Her diverse portfolio features academic publications, educational technological developments many of which relate to learning environments, the use of technology in education, and public health education. She has also been a faculty member and lecturer in diverse universities around the world.

  • Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable

    Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable
    @nimhd

    Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health


  • Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D. is Director of the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), which seeks to advance the science of minority health and health disparities research through research, training, research capacity development, public education, and information dissemination. Dr. Pérez-Stable practiced general internal medicine for 37 years at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) before moving to NIH in September 2015. He was professor of medicine at UCSF and chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine for 17 years. His research interests include improving the health of racial and ethnic minorities and underserved populations, advancing patient-centered care, improving cross-cultural communication skills among clinicians, and promoting diversity in the biomedical research workforce. For more than 30 years, Dr. Pérez-Stable led research on Latino smoking cessation and tobacco control policy in the United States and Latin America, addressing clinical and prevention issues in cancer screening, and mentoring over 70 minority investigators. He has published over 300 peer-reviewed articles and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2001.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, April 5th 2021 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP1
    . 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
    Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 2)
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 3)
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 1: Data, race, and COVID-19

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first panel in our series will explore the importance of collecting and utilizing data on race to better understand the impact of the pandemic.

Cohosted with Boston University Center for Antiracist Research


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe economic effects of COVID on households included in the Children’s HealthWatch survey.
  • Describe evidence for the association of structural racism and telehealth inequities among Black and Latinx communities, and the implications of those inequities
  • List 2 factors experienced by Black and Latinx students that negatively influence their academic success and provide a possible intervention to address them
  • Describe data limitations that impede comparing COVID case and death rates across States, as identified by the COVID Racial Data Tracker

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

  • Ibram Kendi

    Ibram Kendi
    @dribram

    Director and Founder, Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

  • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

  • Jayakanth Srinivasan

    Jayakanth Srinivasan

    Research Associate Professor, Boston University Questrom School of Business

  • Megan Sandel

    Megan Sandel
    @megansandel

    Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine

  • Stephen A. Wilson

    Stephen A. Wilson

    Chair, Family Medicine,

    Boston University

    School of Public Health

  • Aviva Geiger Schwarz

    Aviva Geiger Schwarz

    Data Editor, The COVID Racial Data Tracker, Boston University Center for Antiracist Research

  • Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba

    Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba
    @stephaniedc


    Executive Director, Children’s HealthWatch

  • KimberlyAtkins

    Kimberly Atkins
    @kimberlyatkins

    MODERATOR
    Senior Opinion Writer,
    The Boston Globe

  • Kimberly Atkins is a senior opinion writer and columnist at The Boston Globe, and lead columnist for The Emancipator, a joint venture by Globe Opinion and the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research that reimagines 19th-century abolitionist newspapers to reframe the current national conversation on racial justice. She is also an MSNBC contributor, and a guest host for the NPR/WBUR-produced news program On Point. She is also co-host of the weekly podcast #SistersInLaw, which breaks down the law behind the headlines of the week. Previously, Kimberly was the first Washington, DC-based news correspondent for WBUR. She has also served as the Boston Herald’s Washington bureau chief, guest host of C-SPAN’s morning call-in show Washington Journal, and a Supreme Court reporter for Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly and its sister publications. She has appeared as a political commentator on a host of national and international television and radio networks, including CNN, Fox News, NBC News, PBS, NPR, Sky News (UK), and CBC News (Canada). Before launching her journalism career, she was a trial and appellate litigation attorney in Boston. Kimberly is a native of Michigan, and a graduate of Wayne State University, Boston University School of Law and Boston University College of Communication, and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

  • Julia Raifman

    Julia Raifman
    @juliaraifman

    Assistant Professor,
    Boston University
    School of Public Health

  • Kaye-Alese Green

    Kaye-Alese Green
    @kayalese

    Diversity & Inclusion Fellow, BUSM, Visiting Fellow, Institute of Health Systems Innovation & Policy

  • Kaye-Alese Green received a BS in Psychology and Master’s in Interdisciplinary Studies with a dual concentration in Public Health and Urban Education from the University of Central Florida. Currently she is in between her second and third year of medical school and is serving as the inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Fellow for Boston University School of Medicine with a joint appointment as a Research Fellow at BU’s Institute of Health Systems Innovation & Policy. Ms. Green’s research interests include pediatric trauma, medical education reform and upstream divers of health disparities.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health workforce members interested in Systemic Inequities for black lives
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 10 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 55 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_SIIBL.  If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

When looking at the disproportionate impact in health disparities on communities of color, the black community's experience can be an indicator of what is happening to all marginalized communities. It is possible that empathy is hard to have as a member of a less impacted community. If you don't see it and don't experience it, it seems you don't feel it.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List four ways in which Black and Brown communities have been disadvantaged more than white communities due to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Name three health impacts of not having stable and safe housing
  • Name two actions on housing policies that can reduce housing inequity
  • Name three ways that the Justice System can reduce racial injustice

Subject Matter Expert

  • Danielle Cooper
    Dr. Danielle Cooper

Dr. Danielle Cooper is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and the Director of Research at the Tow Youth Justice Institute at the University of New Haven. Dr. Cooper received her BS in Justice Systems (with a minor in Business Administration) in 2009 and her MA in Criminology from the University of Florida in 2011. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology (with a minor in Organizational Leadership for Nonprofits) from the University of Florida in 2015.
In addition to her work as a Professor and the Director of Research at UNH, she is also a Certified Prevention Professional who works with nonprofits and community organizations as a prevention trainer and evaluation consultant. Through her work in the community, she has collaborated with key stakeholders, such as youth and their parents, law enforcement, mental health professionals, and youth-serving organizations.

  • Danielle Cooper
    Karen DuBois-Walton

Karen DuBois-Walton currently serves as the President of the Elm City Communities/Housing Authority of the City of New Haven and President of The Glendower Group, LLC (the development affiliate of HANH) and 360 Management Group, Inc. (the property management affiliate) responsible for administrative, programmatic and policy direction of the public housing, housing choice voucher program, finance and planning, and development activities.
Dr. DuBois-Walton resides in New Haven. She is actively involved in a number of non-profit boards dedicating time to creating greater equity for those who are marginalized. She leads efforts within New Haven and the Region to remove barriers to fair housing, reverse housing segregation patterns, and to invest in under-resourced communities.

  • Linda K. Barry
    Linda K. Barry, M.D., M.P.H., FACS

Linda K. Barry, M.D., M.P.H., FACS is a board-certified liver and pancreas surgeon with a unique background in both clinical and basic science research. As an Associate Professor of Surgery, Dr. Barry practices and teaches at the University of Connecticut Medical School and holds the position of Director of the Office of Multicultural and Community. She previously served as Assistant Director and Chief Operating Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science (CICATS) at the University of Connecticut, Co-Director for the CICATS Pilot Program for Collaborative Translational and Clinical Research, Director of the Young Innovative Investigator Program, and Director of the CICATS M1 Mentorship Program. Dr. Barry’s professional experience and life’s work has been in addressing health disparities in health care delivery and research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. 

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts, quality improvement/performance improvement staff, program evaluators, and public health workforce members interested in learning about how to use data for racial equity and health equity.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on February 17, 2021
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_REDR. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:PowerPoint of presentation, Links to addtional resources inlcuding the Racial Equity Data Road Map
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This presentation will describe the Racial Equity Data Road Map, a tool developed at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to facilitate using data towards eliminating structural racism. Use of the Racial Equity Data Road Map can support programs to authentically engage communities; frame data in the broader historical and structural contexts that impact health; communicate that inequities are unfair, unjust and preventable; and design solutions that address racism and other root causes of inequities. Presenters will address common challenges related to using data to inform racial equity work, program monitoring, quality improvement and performance management.



What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • State or identify how a racial equity approach can be applied to data, continuous quality improvement (CQI), and program implementation
  • Apply strategies to enhance the use of data to promote racial equity
  • List three sources of available data

Subject Matter Expert

  • Christine Silva
    Christine Silva

Christine Silva, MPH is an Epidemiologist at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. As the Director of the Massachusetts Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program, Ms. Silva is responsible for all operational aspects of Massachusetts MIECHV including program operations, implementation, and adherence to federal grant and reporting requirements. She previously served as the program epidemiologist responsible for conducting analyses for the purposes of program monitoring and development, quality improvement, and evaluation of MIECHV. Ms. Silva is charged with demonstrating program effectiveness and measuring the impact of services for statewide evidence-based home visiting models. Ms. Silva received a B.A from Boston University and an MPH from the Boston University School of Public Health, and is a certified Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

  • Sarah Lederberg Stone
    Sarah Lederberg Stone

Sarah Lederberg Stone, MPH, PhD, is an Epidemiologist in the Division of Maternal and Child Health Research and Analysis at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.  Dr. Stone supports the Massachusetts WIC Program (the USDA’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children), with an emphasis on using data to promote health equity. She also plays a key role in drafting the annual Title V MCH Block Grant report and the five-year needs assessment to select state Title V priorities and develop structural and process measures.  Dr. Stone is a certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, and earned her MPH and PhD in Epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in MCH Applied Epidemiology through the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

“My BOSS Network” – A Conceptual Framework to Develop Social Capital

How can we use intersectionality of social capital, civic engagement and health equity to build a network that provides more “seats at the table” for policy input?

logo_NEPHTC             

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 11, 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 20 min
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This presentation will discuss a model approach to increase capacity-building skills of individuals from under-served communities to strategically create strong social bridges and linkages; and purposefully build an effective network. Lessons drawn from a 10-months AmeriCorps service experience about the value of the intersectionality of social capital, civic engagement and health equity inform the development of a conceptual framework-- “My BOSS Network” and will drive the design of interventions that evaluate individuals perceived capabilities to leverage their social capital to gain a seat at the table and contribute to policy decisions that impact the health outcomes of their communities. Recorded at the CT Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Conference on Wednesday, November 11, 2020.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the intersectionality of health equity, civic engagement and social capital
  • Discuss a model framework to develop an influential social/professional informal network

Subject Matter Expert

  • Selina A. Osei
    Selina A. Osei

Selina A. Osei is a Public Health Practitioner who works with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)’s Population Health Management department on Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) programs. Selina aspires to work within the space of global health systems delivery design targeting resource-poor communities. With a purpose driven goal to achieve health equity so that everyone can have the opportunity to live up to their full potential, Selina also serves as the incumbent Communications & Membership Committee Chair for the Connecticut Chapter of the National Association for Health Service Executives (NAHSE). As a community organizer, AmeriCorps Alumni, and past student Ambassador for UNESCO, Selina is passionate about serving her community through volunteerism in her spare time. Selina graduated from University of Connecticut with a B.S in Chemistry, University at Albany School of Public Health with an MPH, earned her MD as an international medical graduate and pursued an MBA in business management from Davenport University to best achieve her purpose driven goals.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Engaging Indigenous Communities in Health Equity Activities

Learn more about this webinar!

Photo credit: Abigail Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), Director of the Urban Indian Health Institute

Engaging Indigenous Communities in Health Equity Activities

How can we ensure that the needs of indigenous communities are not overlooked in health equity efforts?

logo_NEPHTC Health Education Center logo 

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on November 10 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 30 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: 01082021.  If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Indigenous communities, people who identify as American Indian and Alaska Native, have long faced systemic oppression in this country which is reflected in poor health outcomes. For example, indigenous communities have a life expectancy that is 5.5 years shorter than the national average. Learn about how Connecticut has treated indigenous communities in the past, how these injustices impact policy today and how you can engage this population in health planning. While the focus is on Connecticut, this presentation has information useful for practice in any state.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Name the indigenous communities in Connecticut
  • Describe how indigenous communities have been overlooked in health equity outcomes
  • Recall examples of state policies that resulted in unjust treatment of native peoples
  • Discuss strategies for outreach and inclusion for this population

Subject Matter Expert

  • Michele Scott
    Michele Scott Dixon (Mashantucket Pequot)

Michele Scott is the Executive Director of The Health Education Center located in Norwich, CT where she works diligently to ensure that the healthcare workforce pipeline reflects the communities it serves. She brings with her a background in community health, strategic planning, program evaluation and a commitment to equity within health systems. Michele serves as Chair of the Health Care Advisory Board of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation and is a member of The Arc Eastern Connecticut Board of Directors. Michele received her B.A in Psychology and American Studies from Columbia University and her M.S. in Organizational Leadership from Quinnipiac University. She resides on the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation with her family.

Michele is available at scott@healtheducenter.org to answer any webinar follow up questions.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health and health professions students and faculty, interested community members
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: 3rd December 2020, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm ET, 9:00 am-10:30 am PT
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 .5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: 12032020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

The endeavor to digitize processes and centralize data that assess risk and grant access to vital community resources is inherently a negotiation in power, ownership, and social control. This session will explore the power dynamics inherent in public health data collection and how data integration platforms can functionally "do no harm."


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the ways public health data can be used to address and reinforce social inequality
  • Articulate anti-racist approaches to public health data collection

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Rhea Boyd MD, MPH
    Pediatrician, Public Health Advocate, and Scholar

Rhea Boyd MD, MPH is a pediatrician, public health advocate, and scholar who writes and teaches on the relationship between structural racism, inequity and health. She has a particular focus on the child and public health impacts of harmful policing practices and policies. She serves as the Chief Medical Officer of San Diego 211, working with navigators to address social needs of San Diegans impacted by chronic illness and poverty. And she is the Director of Equity and Justice for The California Children's Trust, an initiative to advance mental health access to children and youth across California. Dr. Boyd graduated cum laude with a B.A. in Africana Studies and Health from the University of Notre Dame. She earned a M.D. at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at University of California, San Francisco. In 2017, Dr. Boyd graduated from the Commonwealth Fund Mongan Minority Health Policy Fellowship at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, earning a Master of Public Health.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Raising the Bar: On Racism, Health and Publication Standards

Racism is a root cause of racial health inequities. Yet researchers and journals publish on racial health inequities without mentioning or examining racism. How do we raise this bar?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health faculty, authors, publishers, reviewers, organizations and practitioners who rely on public health publications
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: November 19, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_11192020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Communication and Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Dr. Boyd will explore racism as a root cause of racial health inequities. Given this foundation, she will issue a challenge to researchers, journals, reviewers, and readers to engage racism within their analysis of racial health inequities.


What you'll learn

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • List 2 concrete ways racism impacts health
  • Analyze racial disparities emerging during the US COVID19 pandemic and the racial disparities evidenced by disproportionate police violence, within the history of racism in the US
  • Propose new publication standards that engage racism as a root cause of racial health inequities


Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Rhea Boyd MD, MPH

    Pediatrician, Public Health Advocate, and Scholar

Rhea Boyd MD, MPH is a pediatrician, public health advocate, and scholar who writes and teaches on the relationship between structural racism, inequity and health. She has a particular focus on the child and public health impacts of harmful policing practices and policies. She serves as the Chief Medical Officer of San Diego 211, working with navigators to address social needs of San Diegans impacted by chronic illness and poverty. And she is the Director of Equity and Justice for The California Children's Trust, an initiative to advance mental health access to children and youth across California.

Dr. Boyd graduated cum laude with a B.A. in Africana Studies and Health from the University of Notre Dame. She earned a M.D. at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at University of California, San Francisco. In 2017, Dr. Boyd graduated from the Commonwealth Fund Mongan Minority Health Policy Fellowship at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, earning an M.P.H.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional professionals serving communities of concern
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 23, 2020
    11:00 - 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:  If you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour and the contact hour(s) for this course may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. You may want to check with your credentialing body if you’re unsure if this course meets its continuing education requirements.
  • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Participants will explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and this new moment in the civil rights movement for Black lives through a lens of trauma-informed care. The workshop will cover self- and community care, self-reflection for allyship and liberation, and resiliency-building through a lens of racial and gender justice.



What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify tools for self- and community care to help sustain health workers in a critical time
  • Name Principles of Trauma-Informed Care and some ways they can be applied to daily work with colleagues and clients/ patients
  • Think about how to hold trauma-informed, healing-centered space to talk about some of the major changes happening in our society right now.
  • Deepen a self-reflection practice for resiliency-building and improved collaboration.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Samantha Calero
    Samantha Calero

Samantha Isabel Calero (Sam, she/her) is a biracial Latinx public health consultant. Her work includes training and facilitation, technical assistance, policy analysis and development and organizational capacity building to address trauma, resiliency, racial and gender justice. She approaches her work with an intersectional, margins-to-center lens of relationship building and critical analysis for change. Sam is a member of Mijente and currently is completing her master's degree in health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She lives in Roxbury with her daughter.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

About this Webinar

Instead of an all-or-nothing approach to risk prevention, we need an approach that allows people to live their lives while reducing their risk.  What does harm reduction look like for the coronavirus?

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the principles of harm reduction as a public health approach
  • Apply the principle of harm reduction to the current COVID -19 pandemic
  • Discuss the intersection of harm reduction and institutional racism

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Linette Liebling, MSPH

Linette Liebling, MSPH, has worked as a Public Health educator for over three decades. Ms. Liebling trains CHWs, clinic and hotline counselors, case managers, school health educators, youth workers, and other community health educators on strategies of behavior change as well as various sexual health topics. She is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Psychology Department at Wheaton College where she has taught since 2006.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

How Do We Train for Health Equity? Lessons from Health Equity Coordinator, Tacoma, WA

How has a leading health department trained to integrate health equity into its programming and planning?

Tacoma Health Dpt logo   



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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, community professionals wishing to increase health equity, trainers, training planners, managers and leaders who can arrange training, workforce development teams, community health workers
  • Format: Self-paced video from live training
  • Date/Time:
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 6 part series - 1 hour of video
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:SS1131137_HWTHE.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
    Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings Introduction to Systems Thinking
    Thinking Lobbying and Advocacy: A Primer for NH Non-Profit Advocates
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

See the highlights of a joint NEPHTC (Public Health) Advisory Committee, SHIELD (School Health) Advisory Committee meeting in which met with community partners to learn and consider “How Do We Train for Health Equity?” Leading the training was Jacques Colon, Health Equity Coordinator of the Tacoma-Pierce Health Department in Washington. Jacques provides an overview of health equity and gives examples from TPHD’s work in training and implementing health equity in programs and functions.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the difference between Health Disparity and Health Inequity
  • Identify a resource that can help a health department define its health equity needs
  • Describe Tacoma Pierce Health Department’s consultative approach to supporting health equity in programs

Subject Matter Expert

  • Jacques Colon
    Jacques Colon
    Health Equity Coordinator,
    Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department

Jacques Colon has served as the for the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department for the past three years, where he leads their Health Equity Initiative. This role includes leading the health department’s internal 10-person Health Equity Implementation Team, which is charged with improving the structures, processes, and practices of the health department in order to eliminate health inequities in Pierce County, WA.

Registration and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact trainingmanager@nephtc.org.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the webinar. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Category: Webinars

Culturally Effective Organizations: Using the Toolkit

Learn more about this webinar!

Culturally Effective Organizations: Using the Toolkit


What tools are available to use anytime to help my health care, community organization or health department become more culturally effective?

  

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Course Information

  • Audience: Health care, community providers, public health departments
  • Format: Online webinar
  • Date/Time: 7 December 2017, 10 AM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Certificate of completion
  • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental materials: Power Point
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

This webinar is for clinical and administrative staff who can help move their organization into becoming more culturally effective. This webinar will provide an overview of available tools and suggested uses.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of the framework for culturally effective organizations
  • Identify action steps for your organization to become more culturally effective
  • Reflect on how you can be an agent of change in your work setting.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Paula Smith, MBA, EdD(c)
     Director
    Southern New Hampshire AHEC

Registration and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact trainingmanager@nephtc.org.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the webinar. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Category: Webinars

An Equity Guided Approach to Public Health for Leaders at All Levels

What framework can help me develop my confident leadership approach to health equity?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health organizations and professionals interested in improving health equity; leaders and managers responsible for developing strategies, programs, policies and partnerships.
  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:

    Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:SS1131137_AEGAPHL.If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion trainings:  None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this course

This workshop will teach you the definitions, value driven actions and skills needed to develop your leadership approach to health equity. You’ll think about applying the actions and skills in your setting or scope of influence, in order to allow you to incorporate health equity principles into public health strategies, programs, interventions, identify inequities, modify outcomes and increase partnerships.

What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Define health equity and key terms related to health equity
  • Identify four value-driven leadership actions for health equity
  • Practice the value-driven actions in your scope of influence
  • Practice applying five deBeaumont Strategic Skills to better approach your health equity issue
  • Develop a plan for ongoing self-directed learning
  • Sandro Galea

    Jewel Mullen, MD, MPD

    Associate Dean for Health Equity, University of Texas 

  • Jewel Mullen, M.D., MPH, is the associate dean for health equity at the Dell Medical School, as well as an associate professor in the school’s population health and internal medicine departments. She also serves as a senior consultant for Ascension Seton to help meet health equity goals across its system. Mullen is an internist, epidemiologist, public health physician leader and the former principal deputy assistant secretary for health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). While at HHS, she also served as the acting assistant secretary for health and acting director of the National Vaccine Program Office during the months bridging the transition from the Obama to the Trump administrations. Prior to her time at HHS, Mullen served for five years as commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health. Her career has spanned clinical, research, teaching and administrative roles focused on improving the health of all people, especially those who are underserved. She is recognized nationally and internationally as a leader in building effective community-based chronic disease prevention programs and for her commitment to improving individual and population health by strengthening coordination between community, public health and health care systems. Mullen is the former director of the Bureau of Community Health and Prevention at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and medical director of Baystate Mason Square Neighborhood Health Center in Springfield, Massachusetts. She has held faculty appointments at the New York University, University of Virginia, Yale University and Tufts University schools of medicine. As Connecticut’s public health commissioner, Mullen created an Office of Health Equity Research, Evaluation and Policy to ensure that reducing disparities was included as a deliberate, measurable outcome of the department’s programmatic and regulatory efforts. She also successfully spearheaded initiatives to reduce racial disparities in low birth weight and infant mortality, advanced legislation to improve end-of-life care and led development of the state’s health assessment and health improvement plan as precursors to the department achieving accreditation by the Public Health Accreditation Board. As commissioner, she also directed her agency’s response to events such as natural disasters, the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School and infectious disease outbreaks such as Ebola. Her accomplishments at HHS included participation in the coordination of the federal public health response to Zika, working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), other federal partners and leaders in Puerto Rico. Mullen serves on the editorial board of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Policies for Action National Advisory Committee, the Alzheimer’s Association/CDC Healthy Brain Initiative Leadership Committee and the Medical Education Committee for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She also is a member of the Committee on a National Strategy for Cancer Control in the United States at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. A former member of the Advisory Committee to the CDC Director and its subcommittee on health disparities, Mullen chaired the CDC’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Federal Advisory Committee. She is a former president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Board certified in internal medicine, Mullen received her bachelor’s degree and Master of Public Health from Yale University where she also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in psychosocial epidemiology. She graduated from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where she was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society, and completed her residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

  • Sandro Galea

    Lailea Noel, PhD

    Assistant Professor, University of Texas

  • Lailea Noel is an assistant professor at the Steve Hicks School of Social Work. Noel’s research investigates the social and economic conditions that contribute to lower cancer treatment utilization and higher mortality rates in marginalized communities, particularly communities of color, and communities within residentially segregated urban and rural neighborhoods. She has a passion for conducting community-based participatory research and has a wealth of experience engaging communities, social scientists and medical professionals in such research partnerships. Her research interest and approach are informed by the two decades she spent as an oncology social work administrator at prestigious organizations — including the American Cancer Society and University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center — prior to pursuing her Ph.D. During her doctoral studies at Washington University in St. Louis, Noel participated in a five-year, community-based participatory research project in an area with high rates of poverty and the worst cancer mortality rates in metropolitan St. Louis. Her dissertation work, supported by an American Cancer Society Doctoral Training Grant in Oncology Social Work, explored the experiences of African American women in St. Louis, who had not started treatment for breast cancer six-months to two years following diagnosis. Since she joined the NYU Silver faculty in 2016, and was the 2018-19 Donald D. Harrington Faculty Fellow at The University of Texas at Austin.

Enrollment and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for the course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement:

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Self-Paced

School and Community Health Equity Needs Assessment (SCHENA) 2019-2020

Have you considered how institutional racism impacts student health and achievement in your school district and community?

New England Public Health Training Center 

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Enroll

Course Information

  • Audience: School nurse managers in CSHS funded districts. Mandatory for Model Program districts, optional for Affiliated districts
  • Format: Blended: Classroom and webinar
  • Price: $600
  • Length: Monthly sessions (3 live classroom, 6 webinars) September through May
    Total ~25 hours
  • Course Release Date: 09/19/2019
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Certificate of completion
    PDPs will be provided
  • Competencies:
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Companion trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials: Course Syllabus (pdf)
  • Pre-requisites: For those seeking CEU or CNE Credit:
    • Registered Nurse
    • Registered Nurse
    • Bachelor of Science in Nursing
    • Licensed Social Worker (i.e., LICSW, LSW, LCSW)

About this course

This course introduces the participant to current practices and approaches to community assessment and planning for the purpose of community health improvement. Multiple exercises along the way will culminate in the development of a school/community equity needs assessment report for the participant’s school or district, and a preliminary community health improvement plan that corresponds to state performance measures. The second year of the course will pick up from the community health improvement plan, and guide the development of a specific continuing quality improvement CQI) project.


What you'll learn

By the end of Year 1 of the SCHENA program, participants will be able to:

  • See themselves as public health change agents in the school setting
  • Apply a racial equity lens in health data collection and interpretation
  • Develop a school/community needs assessment and equity-focused community health improvement plan
  • Identify strong school/community relationships and ones that still need fostering

Specifically, participants completing this course will develop skills in:

  • Planning your assessment activities including identifying important stakeholders and community partners.
  • Practicing principles of health equity as you develop community understanding and partnerships.
  • Identifying, collecting and presenting health and demographic data about your community (including many new web-based data platforms).
  • Documenting sources and consequences of health inequities in the community.
  • Designing and conducting key informant interviews and assessment surveys.
  • Assembling the information you’ve collected and communicating findings in an assessment report.
  • Developing a preliminary Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) which stems from your assessment findings and community input, and promotes health and educational equity.
  • Presenting assessment results and CHIP to your community

Learning Resources

All readings and course materials will be posted on a course Moodle page.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Candice Belanoff
    Candice Belanoff
    ScD, MPH

Candice Belanoff, ScD, MPH, is a Maternal and Child Health Epidemiologist with a particular interest in the relationship of social forces and inequities to patterns of population health. Candice designed and is the founding Director of the Community Assessment, Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation (CAPDIE) certificate program, which has over 100 enrolled students (as of 2018). She also teaches several courses at BUSPH, including Perinatal Epidemiology (MC759), Assessment and Planning for Health Promotion (SB820), and Social Justice and the Health of Populations: Racism and other systems of oppression (MC775).


Having trouble accessing the course?
Contact support@nephtc.org

The materials for this course may be audited at no cost. No credit or certificates are provided for this option. Auditing is recommended for anyone who wants to review the course material, access resources, or to refresh skills. Completion of a pre-test is required to begin the audit but, once you’ve completed the pre-test, you will have future access to the course without having to repeat it.

Category: Blended