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Courses with keyword "MUCP and Racism"

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I

What are some opportunities for public health practitioners to contribute to the prevention of trauma and its after-effects in the community?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific types of primary, secondary, and tertiary systemic or community-wide prevention strategies for trauma
  • Discuss the impact of racism, in terms of policies and practices, microaggressions, and other types of discriminatory behaviors, resulting in “racial trauma”
  • Describe the complicated relationship between traumatic brain injury and opioid use disorder
  • List 9 physical health conditions shown to be associated with experiencing trauma
  • Discuss the link between trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and cardiovascular disease in women

Moderator

  • Paula Schnurr

    Paula Schnurr
    @VA_PTSD_INFO

    MODERATOR Executive Director, National Center for PTSD and Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine

  • Subject Matter Experts

    • Rachel Sayko Adams

      Rachel Sayko Adams
      @RSAYKO_ADAMS

      Senior Scientist,
      Inst. for Behavioral Health, Heller School for Social Policy Management
      Brandeis University

    • Rachel Sayko Adams, PhD, MPH is a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health at the Heller School for Social Policy & Management at Brandeis University and a proud alum of Boston University’s School of Public Health where she completed her Master’s in Public Health. She is a health services researcher with expertise examining co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions following traumatic brain injury in military/Veteran and civilian populations, with a particular focus on at-risk alcohol use and prescription opioid use. Dr. Adams is the Co-PI of the INROADS study at Brandeis, Intersecting Research on Opioid Misuse, Addiction, and Disability Services, which is examining the intersection between addiction, disability, and service provision in an effort to address the rise of opioid use disorders among people with disabilities, funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. She is a MPI of an R01 from the National Institute of Mental Health which is integrating data from the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration to enhance suicide prevention efforts for military members returning from deployments using machine learning. Dr. Adams has an appointment as a health services researcher with the Veterans Health Administration Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center in Aurora, Colorado.

    • Jennifer Sumner

      Jennifer Sumner
      @SUMNERSTRESSLAB

      Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology,
      University of California, Los Angeles

    • Dr. Jennifer Sumner is a clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is the Director of the Sumner Stress Lab at UCLA, and her program of research lies at the intersection of the psychological and physical health consequences of trauma exposure. The work of the Sumner Stress Lab examines how experiences of trauma and severe stress relate to accelerated aging and risk for chronic disease, with a particular focus on cardiovascular disease—the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The goal of this research is to delineate the pathways by which trauma and severe stress get embedded under the skin to contribute to poor health and to use this information to develop targeted interventions to offset risk for adverse health outcomes after trauma. Dr. Sumner received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Pomona College and her Masters and PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship program at the Charleston Consortium (Traumatic Stress Track) and received postdoctoral training as an Epidemiology Merit Fellow at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Prior to joining UCLA, Dr. Sumner was an Assistant Professor of Behavioral Medicine at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Medical Center.

    • Juliette McClendon

      Juliette McClendon
      @WEAREBIGHEALTH

      Director of Medical
      Affairs,
      Big Health
    • Kathryn Magruder

      Kathryn Magruder
      @MUSCHEALTH

      Professor, Medical University of South Carolina


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Antiracism as Health Policy (Part 3)

Why does intersectionality matter when studying health disparities and how does this relate to COVID susceptibilities among men and women of color?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 7th 2021 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP3. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 1)
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 2)
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 3: Antiracist policy solutions

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The third panel will conclude our series with examining antiracist policy solutions that are informed by data.

Cohosted with Boston University Center for Antiracist Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the approach and requirements of the Anti-Racism in Public Health Act of 2020, introduced in September 2020
  • Describe three essential elements of antiracist health policy solutions
  • Discuss importance of intersectional antiracism research and practice
  • Discuss lessons learned from the COVID experience in New York City about an antiracist approach to public health emergencies
  • Describe a framework for advancing health equity through policies for care delivery and payment reform


Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


      Subject Matter Experts

      • Ibram Kendi

        Ibram Kendi
        @dribram

        Director andFounder,
        Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

      • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

      • Elizabeth Warren

        Elizabeth Warren
        @senwarren

        (OPENING CONVERSATION)
        U.S. Senate, Massachusetts

      • Elizabeth Warren, a fearless consumer advocate who has made her life’s work the fight for middle class families, was elected to the United States Senate on November 6, 2012, by the people of Massachusetts. Elizabeth is recognized as one of the nation’s top experts on bankruptcy and the financial pressures facing middle class families, and the Boston Globe has called her “the plainspoken voice of people getting crushed by so many predatory lenders and under regulated banks.” She is widely credited for the original thinking, political courage, and relentless persistence that led to the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. President Obama asked her to set up the new agency to hold Wall Street banks and other financial institutions accountable, and to protect consumers from financial tricks and traps often hidden in mortgages, credit cards and other financial products. In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, Warren served as Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). Her independent and tireless efforts to protect taxpayers, to hold Wall Street accountable, and to ensure tough oversight of both the Bush and Obama Administrations won praise from both sides of the aisle. The Boston Globe named Elizabeth Warren Bostonian of the Year and TIME Magazine called her a “New Sheriff of Wall Street” for her oversight efforts. During her campaign for the Senate, Elizabeth promised to fight for middle class families and to make sure that everyone has a fair shot to get ahead. She called for policies that would level the regulatory playing field for small businesses and ensure that everyone – even large and powerful corporations – pays a fair share in taxes and is held accountable for breaking the law. Endorsing Elizabeth’s candidacy, the New Bedford Standard-Times said, “Elizabeth Warren has it right on all the things that matter most to us in SouthCoast and across Massachusetts,” with “principles that without a doubt, promote the well-being of the middle class.” The Boston Globe called Elizabeth “a fierce advocate for the lot of working families, creating educational opportunities, and expanding medical research.” The Springfield Republican said, “We need a voice for working families in Washington again. Elizabeth Warren will give us that voice.” Senator Warren was a law professor for more than 30 years, including nearly 20 years as the Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. The graduating class at Harvard twice recognized her with the Sacks-Freund Award for excellence in teaching. She taught courses on commercial law, contracts, and bankruptcy and wrote more than a hundred articles and ten books, including three national best-sellers, A Fighting Chance, The Two-Income Trap, and All Your Worth. National Law Journal named her one of the Most Influential Lawyers of the Decade, TIME Magazine has named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world four times, and she has been honored by the Massachusetts Women’s Bar Association with the Lelia J. Robinson Award. Elizabeth learned first-hand about the economic pressures facing working families, growing up in a family she says was “on the ragged edge of the middle class.” She got married at 19, and after graduating from college, started teaching in elementary school. Her first baby, a daughter Amelia, was born when Elizabeth was 22. When Amelia was two, Elizabeth started law school. Shortly after she graduated, her son Alex was born. Elizabeth hung out a shingle and practiced law out of her living room, but she soon returned to teaching. Elizabeth is a graduate of the University of Houston and Rutgers School of Law. Elizabeth and her husband Bruce Mann have been married for 38 years and live in Cambridge, Massachusetts with their golden retriever, Bailey. They have three grandchildren.

      • Dustin Duncan

        Dustin Duncan
        @drdustinduncan

        Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

      • Dustin T. Duncan, ScD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he directs Columbia’s Spatial Epidemiology Lab and co-directs the department’s Social and Spatial Epidemiology Unit. Dr. Duncan is a Social and Spatial Epidemiologist. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men and transgender women of color. His work appears in leading public health, epidemiology, medical, geography, criminology, demography, and psychology journals. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 150 high-impact articles, book chapters and books, and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s recent work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

      • Torian Easterling

        Torian Easterling
        @drtorian

        First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

      • Dr. Easterling serves as the First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH). Dr. Easterling has spent more than 5 years in a senior leadership role at the Health Department. Prior to serving as First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, Dr. Easterling served as Deputy Commissioner of the Center for Health Equity and Community Wellness at the NYC DOHMH, where he oversaw programmatic work focused on reducing overall premature mortality and closing the racial gap on the top leading causes of preventable death. He also served as the Assistant Commissioner of the Department of Health’s Bureau of Brooklyn Neighborhood Health, where he helped advance key programming to address pressing concerns, including maternal deaths and gun violence. Dr. Easterling is a community physician committed to health equity, social justice and movement building to achieve the health outcomes that all people deserve both locally and globally. Dr. Easterling holds a Bachelor of Science from Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) from Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H) from Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York. He completed his residency in Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens, NY and a General Preventive Medicine residency at Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York.

      • Regina Davis Moss

        Regina Davis Moss
        @dr4equity

        (MODERATOR)

        Associate Executive Director, American Public Health Association

      • Regina Davis Moss is the associate executive director of the American Public Health Association. She oversees a broad portfolio of programs addressing the social determinants of health and has nearly 20 years of experience managing national health promotion initiatives addressing health equity, women’s health, and public health system capacity building. Formerly, Dr. Davis Moss held a senior management position for a chronic disease prevention effort for the National Institute of Health. Prior to that, she worked for the Kaiser Family Foundation where she helped launch the Kaiser Health News online information service and served as the senior producer. Dr. Davis Moss came to Kaiser after serving as a supervisor for an epidemiologic study focused on women’s reproductive health. She also served as a public health service fellow in the Office on Women’s Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Davis Moss earned her Ph.D. in Maternal and Child Health from the University of Maryland, College Park; M.P.H. from George Washington University; B.S. from Howard University, and certificate in public health performance improvement from the University of Minnesota.

      • Consuelo H. Wilkins

        Consuelo H. Wilkins
        @drchwilkins

        Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity, Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

      • Consuelo H. Wilkins, MD, MSCI, Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity and Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is a nationally recognized thought leader in health equity and in addressing the elimination of systemic inequities that impact the health and well-being of racial/ethnic minorities. As a community engagement research scientist, Dr. Wilkins has pioneered new approaches to engaging vulnerable, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and minority populations. She is Principal Investigator of three NIH-funded centers, the Vanderbilt-Miami-Meharry Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine and Population Health; the Center for Improving Clinical Trial Education Recruitment and Enrollment at CTSA Hubs; and the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. She is also PI of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation award on engendering trust in health care among African American men. Dr. Wilkins earned a Bachelor of Science in microbiology and Doctor of Medicine from Howard University. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a Geriatric Medicine fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Following her medical training, she earned a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Washington University School of Medicine.

      • >Marshall Chin

        Marshall Chin
        @marshallchinmd

        Chair, Family Medicine,
         Boston University
        School of
        Public Health

      • Marshall Chin, MD, MPH, is a general internist with extensive experience improving the care of vulnerable patients with chronic disease. He has worked to advance diabetes care and outcomes on the South Side through health care system and community interventions. He also leads initiatives to improve health strategies at a national level as director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)’s Finding Answers: Solving Disparities Through Payment and Delivery System Reform Program Office and Co-Director of the Merck Foundation’s Bridging the Gap: Reducing Disparities in Diabetes Care National Program Office. Dr. Chin performed many of the key research studies informing how to improve diabetes care and outcomes in federally-qualified health centers serving vulnerable populations with limited resources. His work over the past decade leading RWJF’s Finding Answers program led to the creation of the Roadmap to Reduce Disparities. Current projects include improving diabetes outcomes in real-world settings, reducing health disparities by transforming the way care is organized and paid for, enhancing care by facilitating partnerships between the health care system and other sectors such as food and housing, and improving shared decision making among clinicians and LGBTQ people of color. In addition to his clinical and research roles, Dr. Chin is a teacher and award-winning mentor, committed to providing opportunities for trainees. As co-director of the Summer Program in Outcomes Research Training (SPORT), Dr. Chin educates faculty, fellows and students about outcomes research methods — to better understand and improve quality of care. An expert in health care disparities in medicine, Dr. Chin frequently is invited to present his work at national conferences and serve on policy committees. He serves on the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities National Advisory Council and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Community Preventive Services Task Force. He co-chairs the National Quality Forum (NQF) Disparities Standing Committee and is a former President of the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM). Dr. Chin was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2017.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Antiracism as Health Policy (Part 2)

What are some of the flaws in using race as a standalone measure of risk?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 6th 2021, 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP2. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 1) 
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 3) 
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 2: Connecting research and policy

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The second panel will focus on linking research to policy.

Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research and the Rockefeller Foundation-Boston University 3-D Commission.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List at least 5 social or health factors that were associated with race and risk of infection, illness, and death from COVID-19
  • Discuss the role of data and analysis in advancing racial equity in the COVID-19 response
  • List 6 areas of research on structural racism being conducted nationally


Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


      Subject Matter Experts

      • Ibram Kendi

        Ibram Kendi
        @dribram

        Director and
        Founder,
        Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

      • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

      • Ayanna Pressley

        Ayanna Pressley
        @AyannaPressley

        Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine


      • Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley is an activist, a legislator, a survivor, and the first woman of color to be elected to Congress from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Throughout her career as a public servant, Congresswoman Pressley has fought to ensure that those closest to the pain are closest to the power – driving and informing policymaking. Throughout her first term in Congress, Congresswoman Pressley has been a champion for justice: reproductive justice, justice for immigrants, consumer justice, justice for aging Americans, justice for workers, justice for survivors of sexual violence, and justice for the formerly and currently incarcerated. Currently, Congresswoman Pressley serves on two powerful Congressional committees – the House Committee on Oversight and Reform and the House Committee on Financial Services– both of which have remained focused on legislatively addressing issues of care, concern, and consequence to the American people. Prior to being elected to Congress, she served on the Boston City Council for 8 years, and was the first woman of color elected to the council in its 100-year history.

      • Samatha Artiga

        Samantha Artiga
        @sartiga2

        Vice President, Director, Disparities Policy Project, Kaiser Family Foundation


      • Samantha Artiga serves as Vice President and Director of the Racial Equity and Health Policy Program at KFF. In this role, Ms. Artiga leads KFF’s work to provide timely and reliable data, information, and policy analysis on health and health care disparities affecting people of color and underserved groups and efforts to advance racial equity in health and health care. Her work focuses on the intersection of racism and discrimination, social and economic inequities, and health. She also has conducted extensive work related to the health and health care needs of low-income populations and immigrant families and previously served as Associate Director of KFF’s Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Ms. Artiga holds a master’s degree in health policy from the George Washington University.

      • Patricia Williams

        Patricia Williams
        @nusl

        University Distinguished Professor of Law and Humanities, Northeastern University School of Law


      • Professor Williams, one of the most provocative intellectuals in American law and a pioneer of both the law and literature and critical race theory movements in American legal theory, holds a joint appointment between the School of Law and the Department of Philosophy and Religion in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. She is also director of Law, Technology and Ethics Initiatives in the School of Law and the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Professor Williams has published widely in the areas of race, gender, literature and law. Her books, including The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Harvard University Press, 1991), illustrate some of America’s most complex societal problems and challenge our ideas about socio-legal constructs of race and gender. Her work remains at the cutting edge of legal scholarship. Drawing on her prior interrogation of race, gender and personhood, Professor Williams’ current research raises core questions of individual autonomy and identity in the context of legal and ethical debates on science and technology. Her work in the area of health and genetics, for example, questions how racial formation is shaped by the legal regulation of private industry and government. Her work on algorithms grapples with the auditing function of technology in our everyday lives — shaping how we understand who we are.

      • Laura Magaña

        Laura Magaña


        @lauramagvall

        (MODERATOR) President and CEO, Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health

      • Dr. Laura Magaña joined the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) as President and CEO in August 2017. Under Dr. Magaña’s leadership, ASPPH has continued to advance its mission to strengthen the capacity of members by advancing leadership, excellence, and collaboration for academic public health. During her tenure, ASPPH has significantly grown its global engagement, launched the academic public health leadership institute, and enhanced the voice of academic public health through advocacy efforts. Prior to joining ASPPH, Dr. Magaña dedicated more than 35 years to successfully leading the transformation and advancements of public and private universities in Mexico; educational organizations in the USA; United Nations programs; and NGO’s in Central America and Europe. She was most recently the dean of the School of Public Health in Mexico at the ASPPH-member National Institute of Public Health (INSP). Her diverse portfolio features academic publications, educational technological developments many of which relate to learning environments, the use of technology in education, and public health education. She has also been a faculty member and lecturer in diverse universities around the world.

      • Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable

        Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable
        @nimhd

        Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health


      • Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D. is Director of the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), which seeks to advance the science of minority health and health disparities research through research, training, research capacity development, public education, and information dissemination. Dr. Pérez-Stable practiced general internal medicine for 37 years at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) before moving to NIH in September 2015. He was professor of medicine at UCSF and chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine for 17 years. His research interests include improving the health of racial and ethnic minorities and underserved populations, advancing patient-centered care, improving cross-cultural communication skills among clinicians, and promoting diversity in the biomedical research workforce. For more than 30 years, Dr. Pérez-Stable led research on Latino smoking cessation and tobacco control policy in the United States and Latin America, addressing clinical and prevention issues in cancer screening, and mentoring over 70 minority investigators. He has published over 300 peer-reviewed articles and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2001.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, April 5th 2021, 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 2)
    Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 3)
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Part 1: Data, race, and COVID-19

This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first panel in our series will explore the importance of collecting and utilizing data on race to better understand the impact of the pandemic.

Cohosted with Boston University Center for Antiracist Research


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe economic effects of COVID on households included in the Children’s HealthWatch survey.
  • Describe evidence for the association of structural racism and telehealth inequities among Black and Latinx communities, and the implications of those inequities
  • List 2 factors experienced by Black and Latinx students that negatively influence their academic success and provide a possible intervention to address them
  • Describe data limitations that impede comparing COVID case and death rates across States, as identified by the COVID Racial Data Tracker


Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @sandrogalea

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


      Subject Matter Experts

      • Ibram Kendi

        Ibram Kendi
        @dribram

        Director and Founder, Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

      • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

      • Jayakanth Srinivasan

        Jayakanth Srinivasan

        Research Associate Professor, Boston University Questrom School of Business

      • Megan Sandel

        Megan Sandel
        @megansandel

        Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine

      • Stephen A. Wilson

        Stephen A. Wilson

        Chair, Family Medicine,

        Boston University

        School of Public Health

      • Aviva Geiger Schwarz

        Aviva Geiger Schwarz

        Data Editor, The COVID Racial Data Tracker, Boston University Center for Antiracist Research

      • Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba

        Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba
        @stephaniedc


        Executive Director, Children’s HealthWatch

      • KimberlyAtkins

        Kimberly Atkins
        @kimberlyatkins

        MODERATOR
        Senior Opinion Writer,
        The Boston Globe

      • Kimberly Atkins is a senior opinion writer and columnist at The Boston Globe, and lead columnist for The Emancipator, a joint venture by Globe Opinion and the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research that reimagines 19th-century abolitionist newspapers to reframe the current national conversation on racial justice. She is also an MSNBC contributor, and a guest host for the NPR/WBUR-produced news program On Point. She is also co-host of the weekly podcast #SistersInLaw, which breaks down the law behind the headlines of the week. Previously, Kimberly was the first Washington, DC-based news correspondent for WBUR. She has also served as the Boston Herald’s Washington bureau chief, guest host of C-SPAN’s morning call-in show Washington Journal, and a Supreme Court reporter for Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly and its sister publications. She has appeared as a political commentator on a host of national and international television and radio networks, including CNN, Fox News, NBC News, PBS, NPR, Sky News (UK), and CBC News (Canada). Before launching her journalism career, she was a trial and appellate litigation attorney in Boston. Kimberly is a native of Michigan, and a graduate of Wayne State University, Boston University School of Law and Boston University College of Communication, and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

      • Julia Raifman

        Julia Raifman
        @juliaraifman

        Assistant Professor,
        Boston University
        School of Public Health

      • Kaye-Alese Green

        Kaye-Alese Green
        @kayalese

        Diversity & Inclusion Fellow, BUSM, Visiting Fellow, Institute of Health Systems Innovation & Policy

      • Kaye-Alese Green received a BS in Psychology and Master’s in Interdisciplinary Studies with a dual concentration in Public Health and Urban Education from the University of Central Florida. Currently she is in between her second and third year of medical school and is serving as the inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Fellow for Boston University School of Medicine with a joint appointment as a Research Fellow at BU’s Institute of Health Systems Innovation & Policy. Ms. Green’s research interests include pediatric trauma, medical education reform and upstream divers of health disparities.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Epidemiology and Race: Why and How We Study Racial Health Disparities (Part 3)

How do social conditions influence health inequalities and what are some explanations for cross-societal differences and similarities?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 26, 2021: 12:30 – 2:00 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER3.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills, Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 1

    Epidemiology and Race Part 2

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 proxy measures of race and how each might be used to assess association with different health outcomes
  • Describe 5 alternative approaches to better capture the experience of small populations
  • Discuss reasons for the importance of community involvement in understanding race and racial health disparities
  • Discuss concerns about adjusting for some geographic and demographic variables in understanding racial inequities
  • Describe how social policies and indicators over time indicate the presence of structural racism
  • Describe characteristics of three research methods to investigate “intersectionality” or the existence of several simultaneous identities

Moderator

  • Jay Kaufman

    Jay Kaufman

    President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

  • Chanelle Howe

    Chanelle Howe

    Associate Professor, Brown University

  • Jennifer Manly

    Jennifer Manly

    Professor,
    Columbia University

  • Sherman James

    Sherman James

    Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Epidemiology and Race: Why and How We Study Racial Health Disparities (Part 2)

What are some key aspects of discrimination and oppression that are important to measure when examining the effects of multiple oppressions on marginalized populations?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 26, 2021, 10:00 – 11:30 AM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER2.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills, Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 1

    Epidemiology and Race Part 3

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how use of race correction in measurement tools may result in inappropriate or invalid interpretation
  • Discuss opportunities for addressing implicit bias in using epidemiologic data
  • Describe a community intervention to improve medication usage identified by pharmaco-epidemiologic studies
  • Explain the difference in the definitions of race based on biology and social constructs and how they relate to disease risk
  • Discuss how the concept of “intersectionality” helps understand the effects of racism and oppression on individual, interpersonal, institutional, and structural levels

Moderator

  • Jay Kaufman

    Jay Kaufman

    MODERATOR President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

Moderator

  • Jay Kaufman

    Jay Kaufman

    President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

  • Chanelle Howe

    Chanelle Howe

    Associate Professor, Brown University

  • Jennifer Manly

    Jennifer Manly

    Professor,
    Columbia University

  • Sherman James

    Sherman James

    Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, February 25, 2021, 4:30 – 6:00 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER1.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 2

    Epidemiology and Race Part 3

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • List six structural or social determinants of health that disproportionately affect persons of color
  • Describe relationship of self-identification and social identification of race with health outcomes
  • Discuss the importance of understanding causal mechanisms in addressing race and racism in epidemiologic findings
  • Discuss the reasons for and the ramifications of limitations of data sets in assessing race
  • Discuss the fundamental social causes of health inequalities and how they lead to socioeconomic and racial disparities
  • Discuss possible sources of bias that may influence findings about the effects of race on health outcomes

Moderator

  • Jay Kaufman

    Jay Kaufman

    President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

  • Chanelle Howe

    Chanelle Howe

    Associate Professor, Brown University

  • Jennifer Manly

    Jennifer Manly

    Professor,
    Columbia University

  • Sherman James

    Sherman James

    Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts, quality improvement/performance improvement staff, program evaluators, and public health workforce members interested in learning about how to use data for racial equity and health equity.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on February 17, 2021
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_REDR. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills,
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:PowerPoint of presentation, Links to addtional resources inlcuding the Racial Equity Data Road Map
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This presentation will describe the Racial Equity Data Road Map, a tool developed at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to facilitate using data towards eliminating structural racism. Use of the Racial Equity Data Road Map can support programs to authentically engage communities; frame data in the broader historical and structural contexts that impact health; communicate that inequities are unfair, unjust and preventable; and design solutions that address racism and other root causes of inequities. Presenters will address common challenges related to using data to inform racial equity work, program monitoring, quality improvement and performance management.



What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • State or identify how a racial equity approach can be applied to data, continuous quality improvement (CQI), and program implementation
  • Apply strategies to enhance the use of data to promote racial equity
  • List three sources of available data

Subject Matter Experts

  • Christine Silva

    Christine Silva

  • Christine Silva, MPH is an Epidemiologist at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. As the Director of the Massachusetts Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program, Ms. Silva is responsible for all operational aspects of Massachusetts MIECHV including program operations, implementation, and adherence to federal grant and reporting requirements. She previously served as the program epidemiologist responsible for conducting analyses for the purposes of program monitoring and development, quality improvement, and evaluation of MIECHV. Ms. Silva is charged with demonstrating program effectiveness and measuring the impact of services for statewide evidence-based home visiting models. Ms. Silva received a B.A from Boston University and an MPH from the Boston University School of Public Health, and is a certified Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

  • Sarah Lederberg Stone

    Sarah Lederberg Stone

  • Sarah Lederberg Stone, MPH, PhD,is an Epidemiologist in the Division of Maternal and Child Health Research and Analysis at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.  Dr. Stone supports the Massachusetts WIC Program (the USDA’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children),with an emphasis on using data to promote health equity. She also plays a key role in drafting the annual Title V MCH Block Grant report and the five-year needs assessment to select state Title V priorities and develop structural and process measures.  Dr. Stone is a certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, and earned her MPH and PhD in Epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in MCH Applied Epidemiology through the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

MOSAIC - Health Equity Perspectives from our Communities


What needs to take place to dismantle the systemic racism in our public health institutions and what needs to be built for an equitable and just community? Let’s watch the film together to hear from leaders in our communities of color to discover some next steps.

UMass Amherst University of Massachusetts Logo   NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo 
  

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Community Health Workers and Public Heath Professionals
  • Format: Online Film Screening/Discussion
  • Date/Time: Friday, September 30, 2022
    12:00-1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  PM1131137_09302022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Partnership Skills, Health Equity Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials: wmehnfilm.org
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Workshop

What becomes possible when we ask:

What would a world without racism look like?
What would it be like if quality healthcare were accessible to all?
How can we embrace and support wellbeing in all its manifestations?
What could healthy communities look like…and accomplish?

These are some of the questions we continuously ask ourselves in our work at the Western Massachusetts Health Equity Network.  The Network commissioned a film that will serve as a centerpiece to meaningful discussions and action on health equity across Western Massachusetts and New England. MOSAIC amplifies the voices of people working within and for our communities of color toward equity, justice, and representation in all aspects of life, including healthcare.

Join us for a Watch Party and Conversation of MOSAIC: Conversations on Racism and Health in Western Massachusetts/New England . Highlighted in the film are the Women of Color Health Equity Collective, Estoy a Aqui, BRIDGE members in the Berkshires and the Okteteau Cultural Center. For more information before the webinar visit wmhenfilm.org.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the value of personal accounts/short films in illustrating health equity and racial justice issues
  • Examine the ways in which historical and contemporary racism has contributed to health inequities
  • Summarize new ways of approaching health equity through new perspectives offered in the film

This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Brenda D. Evans

    Brenda D. Evans, MPH
    Co-Chair of the
    WMHEN Film
    Summit Planning Committee

  • Brenda D. Evans is a lifelong resident of Springfield, Massachusetts, and a double alum of UMass Amherst. She has more than 20 years of education and experience in the public health field, which includes training, healthcare workforce development, and community engagement. She is dedicated to population health and health equity via advocacy and intersectional systematic change to achieve optimal health for all. Brenda’s public health career includes more than 10 years at the City of Springfield Department of Health & Human Services and serving as Director of the Pioneer Valley Area Health Education Center (PV AHEC), a healthcare workforce development program with a youth component and an adult workforce component. She was a founding member and the director of the Community Outreach Worker Network (COWNT) Coalition of Western Massachusetts, providing support, training, and networking opportunities for Community Health Workers from 2006-2016. She is currently Community Research Liaison for the Center for Community Health Equity Research at UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences, connecting faculty researchers with community-based entities with aligned interests to perform community-based participatory research or community-engaged research. She is also the founding director of the Community Health Workers Coalition of Greater Springfield.

  • Risa Silverman

    Risa Silverman
    Coordinator, Western MA Health Equity Network, UMass School of Public Health & Health Sciences

  • Risa has more than 35 years of experience working as a community organizer and public health networker throughout Western Massachusetts, Philadelphia, and California. She founded and directs the Office for Public Health Practice and Outreach at the University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Public Health & Health Sciences, building connections among students, faculty, and community partners for the past 25 years. She created the Western Massachusetts Health Equity Network (WMHEN) in 2014 to address this region’s unique health equity and justice issues. She teaches Community Development in Health Education to UMASS Amherst undergraduates, and she has served on boards and committees of Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture and the Massachusetts Public Health Association Policy Council. Most recently, Risa began to serve as an ally with the Women of Color Health Equity Collective. For two years of the pandemic, Risa served as Co-Chair for the Professional Staff Union alongside her day job. She has a Master of Public Health degree from UMass Amherst along with bachelor’s degrees in both Peace & Conflict Studies and History from the University of California Berkeley. When COVID became an obstacle to holding the 2022 Western Massachusetts Health Equity Summit, Risa led the effort to commission the film MOSAIC as a centerpiece for smaller events being held throughout the region. In her spare time, she is learning the art of pastels and cooking new foods whenever possible.


    Registration and Contact Hours

    Select the Enroll button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact trainingmanager@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Workshop

An Equity Guided Approach to Public Health for Leaders at All Levels

What value-driven leadership actions will allow you to approach public health improvement through the lens of health equity?

 NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo      UT University of Texas Austin Logo   

UT University of Texas Austin Logo     NCHEC CHES Logo  

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health organizations and professionals interested in improving health equity; leaders and managers responsible for developing strategies, programs, policies and partnerships.
  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:

    Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:SS1131137_AEGAPHL.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion trainings:  None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this course

This course will teach you the definitions, value-driven actions and further learning needed to develop your leadership approach to health equity. You’ll think about applying the actions and skills in your scope of influence.  Over time, developing your equity guided approach will allow you to to incorporate health equity principles into public health strategies and programs, and increase engagement and partnership.

What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Define health equity and key terms related to health equity
  • Identify four value-driven leadership actions for health equity
  • Analyze the value-driven actions in your scope of influence
  • Explore further learning to strengthen leadership, including some strategic skills
  • Sandro Galea

    Jewel Mullen, MD, MPD

    Associate Dean for Health Equity, University of Texas 

  • Jewel Mullen, M.D., MPH, is the associate dean for health equity at the Dell Medical School, as well as an associate professor in the school’s population health and internal medicine departments. She also serves as a senior consultant for Ascension Seton to help meet health equity goals across its system. Mullen is an internist, epidemiologist, public health physician leader and the former principal deputy assistant secretary for health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). While at HHS, she also served as the acting assistant secretary for health and acting director of the National Vaccine Program Office during the months bridging the transition from the Obama to the Trump administrations. Prior to her time at HHS, Mullen served for five years as commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health. Her career has spanned clinical, research, teaching and administrative roles focused on improving the health of all people, especially those who are underserved. She is recognized nationally and internationally as a leader in building effective community-based chronic disease prevention programs and for her commitment to improving individual and population health by strengthening coordination between community, public health and health care systems. Mullen is the former director of the Bureau of Community Health and Prevention at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and medical director of Baystate Mason Square Neighborhood Health Center in Springfield, Massachusetts. She has held faculty appointments at the New York University, University of Virginia, Yale University and Tufts University schools of medicine. As Connecticut’s public health commissioner, Mullen created an Office of Health Equity Research, Evaluation and Policy to ensure that reducing disparities was included as a deliberate, measurable outcome of the department’s programmatic and regulatory efforts. She also successfully spearheaded initiatives to reduce racial disparities in low birth weight and infant mortality, advanced legislation to improve end-of-life care and led development of the state’s health assessment and health improvement plan as precursors to the department achieving accreditation by the Public Health Accreditation Board. As commissioner, she also directed her agency’s response to events such as natural disasters, the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School and infectious disease outbreaks such as Ebola. Her accomplishments at HHS included participation in the coordination of the federal public health response to Zika, working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), other federal partners and leaders in Puerto Rico. Mullen serves on the editorial board of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Policies for Action National Advisory Committee, the Alzheimer’s Association/CDC Healthy Brain Initiative Leadership Committee and the Medical Education Committee for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She also is a member of the Committee on a National Strategy for Cancer Control in the United States at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. A former member of the Advisory Committee to the CDC Director and its subcommittee on health disparities, Mullen chaired the CDC’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Federal Advisory Committee. She is a former president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Board certified in internal medicine, Mullen received her bachelor’s degree and Master of Public Health from Yale University where she also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in psychosocial epidemiology. She graduated from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where she was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society, and completed her residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

  • Sandro Galea

    Lailea Noel, PhD

    Assistant Professor, University of Texas

  • Lailea Noel is an assistant professor at the Steve Hicks School of Social Work. Noel’s research investigates the social and economic conditions that contribute to lower cancer treatment utilization and higher mortality rates in marginalized communities, particularly communities of color, and communities within residentially segregated urban and rural neighborhoods. She has a passion for conducting community-based participatory research and has a wealth of experience engaging communities, social scientists and medical professionals in such research partnerships. Her research interest and approach are informed by the two decades she spent as an oncology social work administrator at prestigious organizations — including the American Cancer Society and University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center — prior to pursuing her Ph.D. During her doctoral studies at Washington University in St. Louis, Noel participated in a five-year, community-based participatory research project in an area with high rates of poverty and the worst cancer mortality rates in metropolitan St. Louis. Her dissertation work, supported by an American Cancer Society Doctoral Training Grant in Oncology Social Work, explored the experiences of African American women in St. Louis, who had not started treatment for breast cancer six-months to two years following diagnosis. Since she joined the NYU Silver faculty in 2016, and was the 2018-19 Donald D. Harrington Faculty Fellow at The University of Texas at Austin.

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Acknowledgement:

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Self-Paced