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Courses with keyword "COVID"

The Next Normal: Politics and Health

How can local public health practitioners communicate effectively with their community members and promote evidence-based public health policies, in light of the existing political polarization and the rise of incorrect information disseminated through media, including social media?

    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 25th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBD
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of politics and policies in mobilizing and protecting the public. What can we learn from the political failures and successes of the Covid-19 era to create a healthier world? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence that “all policy is health policy”
  • Discuss considerations in developing improved health-promoting practices to improve health for all
  • Identify challenges and opportunities for political scientists and policy makers highlighted by the pandemic
  • Describe current social and political factors that influence the ability to implement effective, evidence-based policies

Subject Matter Experts

  • Kellie Carter Jackson

    Kellie Carter Jackson
    @KCARTERJACKSON

    Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities, Wellesley College
  • Sandra Barnes

    Sandra Barnes
    @SANDRALBARNES1

    Professor, Vanderbilt University

  • David Bateman

    David Bateman
    @DAVIDALEXBATEMA

    Associate Professor, Cornell University

  • Kavita Patel

    Kavita Patel
    @KAVITAPMD

    Primary Care Physician and Nonresident Fellow, Brookings Institution

  • Kay Lazar

    Kay Lazar
    @GLOBEKAYLAZAR

    MODERATOR Health Reporter, The Boston Globe

    • Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Education and Health

How can we use lessons learned about modalities and systems that work well to improve personalized education and to widen access, fostering “equicovery” (i.e. recovery that promotes equity)?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, October 5th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBD
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic forced students and teachers out of the classroom and in front of computers. What did we learn from this unplanned shift to virtual learning and its impact on the future of education? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss 6 key considerations for adapting disability research methods and practices in response to restrictions due to COVID pandemic
  • Describe “best practices” of disability research, as learned from experience of international research teams
  • Discuss inequalities in educational opportunities highlighted by COVID pandemic
  • Identify positive aspects of educational experience prompted by COVID that will be used long-term going forward
  • Describe the Times Higher Education (THE) Impact Rankings that assess how universities address social good by delivery of Sustainable Delivery Goals
  • Describe the Times Higher Education (THE) Impact Rankings that assess how universities address social good by delivery of Sustainable Delivery Goals

Subject Matter Experts

  • Morgon Banks

    Morgon Banks
    @MORGONBANKS

    Assistant Professor, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
  • Phil Baty

    Phil Baty
    @PHIL_BATY

    Chief Knowledge Officer, Times Higher Education

  • Chrishana Lloyd

    Chrishana Lloyd
    @CHILDTRENDS

    Senior Research Scientist, Child Trends

  • Deborah Becker

    Deborah Becker
    @WBURDEBBECKER

    MODERATOR Senior Correspondent and Host, WBUR

    • Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal:

How can public health practitioners communicate effectively with communities about emerging science, to identify the trade-offs between individual civil liberties and health of the public, and engage in strategies that encourage communities to embrace the importance of working together to protect each other?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 21st 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBD
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Many conversations surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic were framed as a trade-off between individual liberties and the health of the public. Was this the right framing? 

What are the implications of the moment for future conversations? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 specific ethical questions related to civil liberties posed by mandates (e.g., masks, vaccination) in response to the pandemic
  • Discuss challenges and opportunities COVID-19 exposed in American bioethics
  • Describe how systemic racial discrimination was highlighted and exacerbated by the COVID pandemic
  • Discuss the relationship of social injustice and health inequities and the importance of focusing on avenues to address underlying injustices in future social and legal policies

Subject Matter Experts

  • Nancy Berlinger

    Nancy Berlinger
    @HASTINGSCENTER

    Research Scholar,
    The Hastings
    Center
  • Colleen Flood

    Colleen Flood
    @COLLEENFLOOD2

    Professor and University Research Chair,
    University of Ottawa

  • Chantal Da Silva

    Chantal Da Silva
    @CHANTALADASILVA

    MODERATOR
    Freelance journalist working for NBC News

  • Ruqaiijah Yearby

    Ruqaiijah Yearby
    @RUQAIIJAH

    Professor of Law and Executive Director and CO- Founder, Institute for Healing Justice and Equity, Saint Louis University

    • Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

MACHW Workshops: Trauma Informed Care

Join us as we explore Trauma Informed Care and Building Community Collective & Resilience


NEPHTC Facebook     


Register

Course Information


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

CHWs and Trauma Informed Care: A trauma-informed approach to care is necessary to transform health care. Working on the frontlines, Community Health Workers (CHWs) are public health professionals who simultaneously build on the strengths and resilience of themselves and the communities they serve. CHWs provide supportive care to trauma survivors across various behavioral health spectrums; including grief, loss, substance use and mental health services.

In this workshop we will learn about the impact that traumatic experiences have on individuals, families, and communities. We will also examine the parallels of caring for ourselves as we care for our clients. Finally, we will explore building a community collective that is strength-based and fosters safe and compassionate spaces that encourage resilience.


What you'll learn

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define trauma in their own words
  • Identify triggers and how to recognize our own traumas
  • Prevent and manage traumatic stress when it arises


Subject Matter Expert

  • Hythia Phifer

    Hythia Phifer

  • Hythia Phifer is a mental health therapist and clinical consultant whose practice prioritizes Expressive Arts Therapy, Trauma Healing & Resilience, and Social Justice. She combines formal training with lived experiences to offer tailored strategies that reimagine the ways people engage the work environment and each other. She has experience working within multilevel systems as well as smaller businesses and NGOs. She provides quality interventions with compassion and proficiency in equal measure to senior managers and individual clients. As a clinical consultant, Hythia engages a collaborative approach founded on the belief that her clients hold an innate knowledge of their own needs as well as an awareness of the greater needs of the system they function within. She enjoys utilizing her specialized abilities and clinical background to provide support and strategy to provide tailored solutions to complex challenges.

Moderator

  • Jamie Berberena

    Jamie Berberena

  • Jamie Berberena is a CHW and serves as Regional Chapter Leader in Southeastern Massachusetts and Advisory Board member for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement

    This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

    This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program”. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

To Learn more about the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers please visit: www.machw.org

Category: Blended

The Next Normal: Food and Health

How can the major players in improving food system planning (i.e., food systems, public health, and local government) assure that they work together effectively?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 14th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBD
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The pandemic worsened health inequities across the world, including gaps in access to food. How can we learn from the pandemic to create a healthier world with equal access to health essentials?

This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.

What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the specific goals and indicators included in the UN Summit’s 2015 Sustainable Development Goals that relate to food and hunger, and the current progress towards achieving them
  • Discuss the current prevalence of food insecurity across the globe and the effect of the pandemic
  • Define “sustainable diets” as promoted by EAT-Lancet Healthy Reference diet and discuss considerations for implementing such diets universally
  • Discuss how the pandemic directly affected supply chains, food system workers, and consumers
  • List 4 considerations that should be addressed in creating the “next normal” for food and health systems, especially in the context of urbanization and climate change

Subject Matter Experts

  • Yeeli Mui

    Yeeli Mui
    @DRYEELIMUI

    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Tolullah Oni

    Tolullah Oni
    @DRTOLULLAH

    Clinical Senior Research Associate, University of Cambridge

  • Usha Ramakrishnan

    Usha Ramakrishnan
    @EMORYROLLINS

    Professor, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health

  • May Wang

    May Wang
    @UCLAFSPH

    Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health
  • Julia Belluz

    Julia Belluz
    @JULIAOFTORONTO

    MODERATOR
    Senior Health Correspondent, VOX

    • Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Understanding Vaccine Confidence and Vaccine Hesitancy 

How can health communication be effective in the context of misinformation, high emotion, and ineffective leadership?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 4th 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_UVCVH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Join us for a conversation about vaccine confidence and hesitancy with Dr. Heidi Larson. Dr. Larson’s new book, Stuck: How Vaccine Rumors Start — and Why They Don’t Go Away examines the origin of vaccine hesitancy and the efforts to address the anxiety and reluctance surrounding them..


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • List determinants of vaccine hesitancy identified from a historical perspective, related to contextual influences, individual/social group influences, and vaccine and vaccination-specific issues.
  • Describe the findings of a December 2020 international survey about intent to take vaccine when available, including variability across countries and factors associated with intent
  • Describe the effect of exposure to misinformation on willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in the US and UK
  • List the 4 factors included in the Vaccine Confidence Index
  • Describe effective health communication strategies and specific words in promoting vaccine use.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Heidi Larson

    Heidi Larson
    @PROFHEIDILARSON

    Professor, Founding Director of the Vaccine Confidence Project, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR
    Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Epidemiology and Race: Why and How We Study Racial Health Disparities (Part 3)

How do social conditions influence health inequalities and what are some explanations for cross-societal differences and similarities?

logo_NEPHTC 
Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 26, 2021: 12:30 – 2:00 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER3. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 1

    Epidemiology and Race Part 2

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 proxy measures of race and how each might be used to assess association with different health outcomes
  • Describe 5 alternative approaches to better capture the experience of small populations
  • Discuss reasons for the importance of community involvement in understanding race and racial health disparities
  • Discuss concerns about adjusting for some geographic and demographic variables in understanding racial inequities
  • Describe how social policies and indicators over time indicate the presence of structural racism/li>
  • Describe characteristics of three research methods to investigate “intersectionality” or the existence of several simultaneous identities

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

    • Chanelle Howe

      Chanelle Howe

      Associate Professor, Brown University

    • Sherman James

      Sherman James

      Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy

    • Jennifer Manly

      Jennifer Manly

      Professor, Columbia University

    • Jay Kaufman

      Jay Kaufman

      MODERATOR President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Epidemiology and Race: Why and How We Study Racial Health Disparities (Part 2)

What are some key aspects of discrimination and oppression that are important to measure when examining the effects of multiple oppressions on marginalized populations?

logo_NEPHTC 
Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 26, 2021, 10:00 – 11:30 AM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER2. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 1

    Epidemiology and Race Part 3

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how use of race correction in measurement tools may result in inappropriate or invalid interpretation
  • Discuss opportunities for addressing implicit bias in using epidemiologic data
  • Describe a community intervention to improve medication usage identified by pharmaco-epidemiologic studies
  • Explain the difference in the definitions of race based on biology and social constructs and how they relate to disease risk
  • Discuss how the concept of “intersectionality” helps understand the effects of racism and oppression on individual, interpersonal, institutional, and structural levels

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

    • Chanelle Howe

      Chanelle Howe

      Associate Professor, Brown University

    • Sherman James

      Sherman James

      Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy

    • Jennifer Manly

      Jennifer Manly

      Professor, Columbia University

    • Jay Kaufman

      Jay Kaufman

      MODERATOR President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts and program evaluators, and public health workforce members.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, February 25, 2021, 4:30 – 6:00 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 3 part series, 1.5 hours each
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_ER1. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Epidemiology and Race Part 2

    Epidemiology and Race Part 3

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This series of panels will examine how race and racial health disparities are studied in epidemiology. The first panel in our series will explore the history of census data, how data on race are collected and studied, and the implications of how this data are used in population health science.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • List six structural or social determinants of health that disproportionately affect persons of color
  • Describe relationship of self-identification and social identification of race with health outcomes
  • Discuss the importance of understanding causal mechanisms in addressing race and racism in epidemiologic findings
  • Discuss the reasons for and the ramifications of limitations of data sets in assessing race
  • Discuss the fundamental social causes of health inequalities and how they lead to socioeconomic and racial disparities
  • Discuss possible sources of bias that may influence findings about the effects of race on health outcomes

Subject Matter Experts

  • Wayne Giles

    Wayne Giles

    Dean and Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

    • Chanelle Howe

      Chanelle Howe

      Associate Professor, Brown University

    • Sherman James

      Sherman James

      Susan B. King Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Duke Sanford School of Public Policy

    • Jennifer Manly

      Jennifer Manly

      Professor, Columbia University

    • Jay Kaufman

      Jay Kaufman

      MODERATOR President, Society for Epidemiologic Research

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Covid-19 and Frontline Workers: Nurses, Doctors, and Essential Personnel

What are some ways employers can protect frontline workers in essential industries from medical, familial and economic hardship related to COVID-19?

    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce, Essential industry employers
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 9th March 2021, 4.30 PM – 6 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_C19FW. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Just over a year ago, the COVID-19 pandemic changed how our world operates. Stores closed, employees set up make-shift home offices, and ‘Zoom’ entered our common daily vocabulary. While many of us worked from home, frontline workers remained at work and faced extraordinary workloads, aiming to protect our health. This program will discuss the role of frontline workers in a crisis, and how we can best support and sustain essential personnel during challenging times.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the demographics of home health aides and the largest challenges facing them due to COVID
  • Discuss the mental health symptoms reported by nurses during COVID, and unique risk factors faced by black nurses
  • Describe the disproportionate impact of COVID on communities of color, including food and housing insecurity, substance use disorder, and barriers to care
  • List 8 interventions to mitigate spread of disease and address financial burden on employees initiated by Walmart and by supermarkets to address COVID
  • Identify challenges faced by school nurses in managing problems in controlling spread of disease, continuation of care of students, participation in training, and COVID surveillance and vaccination

Subject Matter Expert


  • Lori T. Freeman

    CEO, National Association of Country & City Health Officials

  • Lori Tremmel Freeman has been the Chief Executive Officer for the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) since May 2018, having returned to the organization after previously served as its Associate Executive Director from 2010-2014.
    In the CEO role, Ms. Freeman works to ensure our country’s nearly 3,000 local health departments have the capacity to deliver essential health services to their communities, advocates for local public health within the U.S. governmental public health system, and assures strategic alliances and partnerships with a wide variety of federal, state, local, public and private agencies and organizations to advance the health of our nation. Prior to joining NACCHO, she served as Chief Executive Officer for the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP) where she provided direction and leadership to protect and promote the optimal health of women, children, and families and actively advocated for sustainable and long-term funding for maternal, child, and adolescent health through the federal Title V grant program. While at AMCHP, she received the distinguished HHS Maternal & Child Health Bureau Director’s Award for noteworthy contributions to the health of infants, mothers, children, adolescents and children with special health care needs.
    Lori Tremmel Freeman is a career non-profit executive, having enjoyed three decades of working in senior association leadership and management roles. Lori Tremmel Freeman’s career includes holding additional CEO and senior leadership positions with the International Test and Evaluation Association (ITEA); Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI); the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI); the American Public Health Association (APHA); and Grant Thornton LLP. She also serves on numerous national advisory groups and Boards related to public health. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Science from Lock Haven University and a Masters degree in Business Administration and Marketing minor from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and currently resides in Haymarket, Virginia with her husband and twin children.


  • Vicki Hoak

    Executive Director, Home Care Association of America


  • Phoenix Matthews

    Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion, University of Illinois Chicago


  • Warren Moore

    Vice President, Walmart Neighborhood Market Pharmacy Operations


  • Elizabeth Peralta

    Former Executive Director, National Supermarket Association

  • Elizabeth Peralta works in the Food and Beverage industry where her mission is to create a sustainable and equitable food system. Peralta has served as the Executive Director of the National Supermarket Association (NSA), where she served to protect the interest of over 500 supermarket owners on the East Coast. It was there where she established White House contact, worked with legislators to pass bills, and created strong partnerships with partners like Lyft, Coca-Cola, Pepsico, and many others to help the most vulnerable New Yorkers. Because of her work before and during the COVID-19 pandemic to protect grocers and the food insecure Peralta was even nominated and selected to be on “City and State’s New York Power 100 list”. Before her time in the Food and Beverage Industry, Peralta was heavily involved in the nonprofit world, where she worked at several museums in New York City and Washington D.C., including the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture before it’s inaugural opening. In 2013, Peralta was awarded a fellowship at the Brooklyn Historical Society, where she researched, curated and developed programming on the common misconceptions of American slavery in New York. In her spare time Peralta proudly serves as the Chair of the Food Education Fund Junior Board, where she alongside the board, works hard to empower those students to be our Food industry leaders of tomorrow.


  • Karen Robitaille

    Director of School Health, Massachusetts Dept.Public Health

  • Prior to becoming the Director of School Health Services for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Karen spent thirteen years as the Director of Health, Safety and Equity Programs for the Northampton Public Schools, and had additionally functioned as the Program Director for the Northampton Prevention Coalition, which was federally funded to reduce youth substance use in the City of Northampton. Karen also currently serves her hometown as Chair of the East Longmeadow Board of Health. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Fitchburg State University, her Master’s in Nursing Management from Elms College, and her MBA, with a concentration in Healthcare Leadership, also from Elms College. Karen is a Nationally Certified School Nurse, a member of National Association of School Nurses/Massachusetts School Nurse Organization, and an inactive member of Sigma Theta Tau, Epsilon Beta chapter.


  • Craig Andrade

    MODERATOR Associate Dean for Practice, Boston University SPH

  • Craig Andrade is Associate Dean of Practice and Director of the Activist Lab at Boston University’s School of Public Health (SPH) where he is serves to catalyze and encourage SPH’s public health practice portfolio locally and globally among all members of the school community, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community partners. He is also a member of the Dean’s Cabinet and the Governing Council and chairs the school’s permanent practice committee.
    Previously Dr. Andrade was the Director of the Bureau of Family Health & Nutrition (BFHN) at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH). BFHN’s programs include Early Intervention (EI), Pregnancy, Infancy and Early Childhood, Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program, Home Visiting, Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, Breastfeeding Initiative, Birth Defects Surveillance, Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program, the Office of Data Translation and Birth Defects Research and Prevention. He also served as Director of the Division of Health Access at DPH, helped found the Racial Equity Leadership Team and Cross-Department Racial Equity Collaborative at DPH and was Associate Dean of Health and Wellness and Director of Student Health Services at Wheaton College in Norton, MA.
    He served as critical care, public health and ward nurse at Boston Medical Center; nurse manager and head athletic trainer at Buckingham Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, MA; and was owner/operator of Active Health, a private health and fitness company. Craig is a registered nurse, athletic trainer, licensed massage therapist and strength and condition specialist with masters and doctoral degrees in public health from Boston University. His research interests include behavioral risk management and resilience-building among children, adolescents and young adults.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Session 4 recorded May 27, 2020
    Session 5 recorded June 2, 2020
    Session 5 recorded June 10, 2020
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_05272021.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, If you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
     
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Building Individual Resiliency in Extended Events
    Session 1, 2 and 3
  • Supplemental materials: Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This Building Resiliency in Extended Events workshop series aims to help participants support resilience through individual and workforce strategies to manage stressors induced by prolonged emergencies. A recording of the didactic part of the workshops are available, together with a summary handout of the main points.

Building resiliency in an extended incident is not an identical process to building resiliency after a single disaster event or in normal non-disaster times. This training will focus on stress on organizational stressors and interventions.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Identify stressors related to the organizational demands of individuals working in public health.
  • Describe useful strategies to mediate, prevent and manage organizational stressors during extended events
  • Recognize when and how to choose interventions to reduce organizational stressors and promote organizational resilience
  • Explain recovery processes in ongoing events

Subject Matter Expert


  • Imani Daniel

  • Imani Daniel is a native Virgin Islander who is committed to community empowerment, sustainability, and creating a culture of preparedness in the Virgin Islands. Currently, Imani serves as the Executive Director of the St. Thomas Recovery Team (STRT). The mission of the STRT is to act as a coalition of diverse community stakeholders that are cooperatively coordinating St. Thomas’ longterm recovery response, resource management, resiliency planning, and training in response to hurricanes Irma and Maria. Imani grew up on St. Thomas and was eager to return home after studying Political Science and Neuropsychology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. She has previously held both research and outreach positions at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, particularly regarding mental health in vulnerable and marginalized communities. Since her return home in 2015, Imani has served as the Community Engagement Specialist for the Virgin Islands Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (VI-EPSCoR) at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) where she engaged other citizens with the ongoing Mare Nostrum research being conducted at UVI. After this appointment, she served as the Chief of Staff for the 32nd Legislature’s Senate Secretary, Senator Jean A. Forde. These two positions have given Imani the tools she needs to excel at advocacy, policy reform and strategic community engagement. Imani focuses on a life of service and giving Virgin Islanders the tools they need to advocate for themselves. She serves on the Board of the Family Resource Center and actively participates in All Saints Cathedral School alumni support events. She still supports VI-EPSCoR through her participation in several grants revolving around Hazard Mitigation, Community Resilience and Natural Resource Management. Recently, she has presented at the 2019 NVOAD (National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster), the 2020 Congressional Black Caucus Leadership Summit, and the 2019 and 2020 CGI (Clinton Global Initiative) conferences to promote the initiatives of the territory. She envisions a stronger and more resilient territory and hopes that her efforts and networks can help provide a more hopeful future in the Virgin Islands.


  • Mark Evces

  • Mark Evces, PhD, ABPP is an organizational consultant and clinical psychologist who, prior to launching WorkHaven LLC, served as the Assistant Director of Mental Health in the NYU School of Medicine, World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Clinical Center of Excellence, and Clinical Instructor of Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine. In his role at the WTC health program, he provided and supervised integrative, evidence-based psychotherapy for first responders, workers, and volunteers who participated in the rescue and recovery response to the WTC attacks of September 11, 2001. He has worked across a variety of public mental health clinical, training, and research settings in Atlanta, New York, and rural Georgia. For six years, he has consulted with nonprofit organizations to help further efforts towards greater workplace health and productivity in pursuit of social justice and human rights. He also maintains a private psychotherapy practice, where he provides trauma-informed care. Dr. Evces, with Gertie Quitangon, MD, co-edited Vicarious Trauma and disaster Mental Health: Understanding Risks and Promoting Resilience, published by Routledge Press in 2015.

Registration and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Food and Housing Insecurity in the Wake of COVID-19: Old Problems, New Opportunities?

How has COVID-19 made it impossible to continue to sweep well-known issues such as food and housing insecurity under the rug, and how can public health use?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: 19th November 2020, 9:00 am-10:30 am ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 50 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_FHIWC19.   If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy development program planning skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Health Haves, Health Nots in a Time of COVID-19
    The Link between Health, Wealth, and Equity: The Economic Impacts of COVID-19 on the People of NH and VT
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Kerri Lowery, esteemed public health lawyer, uses storytelling, data, and policy initiatives to outline the state of housing and food insecurity in the United States. As COVID-19 has illuminated these issues, Lowery discusses the opportunities and partnerships that can be made for the future.

Kerri Lowery provides insight into the lives of those in the United States who are food and housing insecure, discusses the adverse health impacts of food and housing insecurity, and highlights the policy initiatives and partnerships that can be used to address these issues going forward.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Recall the adverse health impacts of food and housing insecurity in the United States
  • Identify policy and partnership programs that can be utilized to address food and housing insecurity
  • Assess how aforementioned components have contributed to consequences in health, food and housing insecurity, and equitable divides in the COVID-19 pandemic

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Kerri McGowan Lowrey, J.D., M.P.H

Kerri McGowan Lowrey, J.D., M.P.H., is Deputy Director and Director for Grants & Research for the Network for Public Health Law, Eastern Region, based at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Kerri has more than 20 years of experience as a public health lawyer. Her areas of focus have included injury prevention law, particularly sports and recreational injury prevention in children and adolescents; laws affecting return to school after traumatic brain injury; health data privacy and sharing in the school setting; education as a social determinant of health; and housing instability. Most recently, Kerri has spearheaded the development of an interprofessional eviction prevention project with the University of Maryland School of Social Work, which seeks to provide legal triage and access to community support services for families facing housing instability due to the pandemic. She currently serves as co-chair of the Children’s Safety Now Alliance Steering Committee, an alliance of more than 35 organizations seeking to elevate child safety as a national priority and address the related needs of state and local health departments. Kerri’s specialized training includes a four-year term as a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute, where she assisted in developing the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Ethics Track. Prior to joining the Network for Public Health Law, Kerri served as Technical Vice President at the MayaTech Corporation in Silver Spring, MD, and Manager of its Center for Health Policy and Legislative Analysis. Kerri received her J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and A.B. in public policy and American institutions from Brown University.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Link between Health, Wealth, and Equity: The Economic Impacts of COVID-19 on the People of NH and VT

When we think about individual economic shortcomings in the United States, there can be a tendency to create a narrative focused on an individual issue. What structural and community type concepts can be applied to economic inequality?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: 17th November 2020, 9:00 am-10:30 am ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 50 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_LBHWE. If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy development program planning skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Food and Housing Insecurity in the Wake of COVID-19: Old Problems, New Opportunities?
    Health Haves, Health Nots in a Time of COVID-19
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Jessica Santos, Ph.D, esteemed lecturer at Heller School for Social Policy & Management at Brandeis University, analyzes the role of policy in how our economy structures health, wealth, jobs, and equity. Santos suggests a need for significant intervention, structuring equity into the future.

Jessica Santos walks the listener through the state of wealth and equity in the United States, while acknowledging the realities of racial and economic divides and urging the listener to consider how to structure equity into the future of economic policy.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the exponential economic impacts of COVID-19 on New Hampshire, Vermont, and the United States
  • Make connections between underlying social, racial, and economic divides; and recognize the consequences of these divides
  • Conclude that significant intervention is needed in economic patterns to structure exponential equity
  • Consider how to craft economic policy in Vermont and New Hampshire while prioritizing racial equity

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Jessica Santos, Ph.D

Lecturer at Heller School for Social Policy & Management, Brandeis University. Principal Investigator on multiple federally and privately funded mixed methods studies focused on examining pathways for economic stability, upward mobility, and equity through social policy.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: 12th November 2020, 9:00 am-10:30 am ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 50 min
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HHHN.  If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and systems thinking skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Food and Housing Insecurity in the Wake of COVID-19: Old Problems, New Opportunities?
    The Link between Health, Wealth, and Equity: The Economic Impacts of COVID-19 on the People of NH and VT
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Sandro Galea, renowned physician, epidemiologist, and author, uses national and local data to explain the how the consequences of health spending, social, racial, and economic divides, and lack of investment in social determinants of health have been exposed by COVID-19

We may have an understanding of how social determinants of health affect health outcomes, but listen as renowned physician, epidemiologist, and author Sandro Galea uses national data and storytelling to show the consequential outcomes of social determinants of health, health spending, and racial and economic divides in the COVID-19 pandemic.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize and discuss social determinants of health, health spending, and health outcomes in the United States
  • Be able to identify and classify underlying social, racial, and economic divides; and recognize the consequences of these divides
  • Assess how aforementioned components have contributed to consequences in health, economy, and divides in the COVID-19 pandemic

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Sandro Galea
    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health

Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

COVID-19: State of the Science

What is the latest science known about COVID-19, and what do we still need to learn?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public interested in the science of COVID-19
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Tuesday, September 15, 2020 9:00 AM -10:30 AM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills 
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

    Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

The seminar brings together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic, exploring what we know now, and what we still need to learn.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the influence of increased testing on the rate of patients requiring hospitalization
  • Rank order the effectiveness (based on current evidence) of various treatment modalities, including convalescent plasma, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, and supportive care
  • Describe the effect of school closures on the spread of the disease and the learning of children
  • List 3 gaps and challenges experienced in the early stages of the pandemic in the United States and possible solutions to address them in the future
  • Define “herd immunity threshold” and describe factors that influence it

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Hallie Prescott

    Associate Professor
    University of Michigan

  • Dr. Hallie Prescott is a member of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. She graduated from Middlebury College with a B.A. in Molecular Biology. She completed medical school and Internal Medicine residency training at The Ohio State University, where she also served as chief medical resident. In 2011, she was recruited to University of Michigan for Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine fellowship. In 2014, Hallie completed her fellowship training and graduated with a Master’s of Science in Health & Healthcare Research.
    Hallie conducts health services research to understand and improve the long-term outcomes of acute medical illnesses. Her initial focus is reducing the need for repeated hospitalization after severe sepsis. She has found that the rate of hospitalization following severe sepsis exceeds patients’ baseline rate of hospitalization as well as that of carefully matched controls. Furthermore, in more recent work published in JAMA, Hallie has found that 42% of hospitalizations in the 90 days after sepsis occur for potentially preventable conditions—recurrent sepsis, less severe infection, heart failure, etc.
    In addition to her research in Medicare beneficiaries, Hallie has also partnered with investigators at Kaiser Permanente to examine hospital readmissions and healthcare utilization of sepsis survivors within Kaiser’s integrated healthcare delivery system. After accounting for the differences in age between the Medicare and Kaiser cohorts, the findings were remarkably similar between these cohorts. The consistent findings across studies demonstrates the pervasiveness of re-hospitalization and new morbidity after sepsis.
    While much of the current research on re-hospitalization focuses whether or not readmission penalties are “fair” to hospitals, Hallie’s work focuses on how to improve outcomes for patients.
    Hallie’s work draws on the tools of health services research, “big data” analytics, and implementation science. Her K08 will build the foundation for future translational research to uncover the biologic mechanisms of long-term morbidity post-sepsis and for future clinical interventions to improve the recovery and reduce healthcare utilization of severe sepsis survivors.


  • Gabriel Leung

    Dean of Medicine, University of Hong Kong

  • Gabriel Leung is the fortieth Dean of Medicine (2013-), inaugural Helen and Francis Zimmern Professor in Population Health and holds the Chair of Public Health Medicine at the University of Hong Kong (HKU). He was the last Head of Community Medicine (2012-3) at the University as well as Hong Kong’s first Under Secretary for Food and Health (2008-11) and fifth Director of the Chief Executive’s Office (2011-2) in government.
    He is an elected member of the US National Academy of Medicine and was awarded the Gold Bauhinia Star (second highest civilian honour) by the Hong Kong government for distinguished service in protecting and promoting population health.
    A specialist in public health medicine, Leung’s interdisciplinary work revolves around topics that have major population health impact locally, where Hong Kong is a reliable and unique epidemiologic sentinel for mainland China and the Chinese diaspora, or where the SAR is best placed to address the fundamental science at hand globally.
    Leung is one of Asia’s leading epidemiologists and global health exponents, having authored more than 500 scholarly papers with an h-index of 65 (Scopus). His research defined the epidemiology of three novel viral epidemics, namely SARS in 2003, influenza A(H7N9) in 2013 and most recently COVID-19. He led Hong Kong government’s efforts against pandemic A(H1N1) in 2009. He was founding co-director of HKU’s World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Control (2014-8) and currently directs the Laboratory of Data Discovery for Health at the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park (2020-).
    In parallel, Leung leads several large-scale longitudinal cohorts (Children of 1997, FAMILY, Department of Health Elderly Health Service cohort), tracking tens of thousands of lives to study the fundamental causes of non-communicable conditions and to explain the health impacts of contemporary social phenomena.
    A final strand of his work concerns the economics and policy issues of health systems. His team is the government’s health accountant and projects health care human resources needs. Regionally, Leung has tirelessly worked to build capacity throughout the Asia Pacific. He served as founding Chair of the Asia Pacific Observatory on Health Systems Policies (2010-14) and continues to lead its Strategic Technical Advisory Committee (2018-).
    Leung regularly advises national and international agencies including the World Health Organisation, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Boao Forum for Asia, Institut Pasteur, Japan Center for International Exchange and China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is an Adjunct Professor of Peking Union Medical College Hospital and Adjunct Professorial Researcher of the China National Health Development Research Center.
    Locally, he was Vice President and Censor in Public Health Medicine of the Hong Kong College of Community Medicine (2006-8), and an elected council member of the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine (2012-9). He is a member of the Hospital Authority (2013-) and completed two terms on the University Grants Committee (2014-9), which are respectively a statutory agency responsible for all public health care services and a government advisory body on the development and funding requirements of the higher education sector.
    He edited the Journal of Public Health (2007-14), was inaugural co-editor of Epidemics, associate editor of Health Policy and is founding deputy editor-in-chief of China CDC Weekly. He currently serves on the editorial boards of seven journals, including the British Medical Journal.
    After reading medicine at the University of Western Ontario, he completed family medicine residency training in Toronto. He earned a master’s from Harvard University and research doctorate from HKU.


  • Gabriela Gomes

    Professor, University of Strathclyde Glasgow

  • I have 30 years of research experience in nonlinear dynamics. With initial interests in the abstraction of symmetries governing pattern formation in natural and experimental systems, in the last 20 years my research activity has primarily involved mathematical modelling of infectious disease dynamics and epidemiology. Over the last 10 years, I became increasingly appreciative of the need to build and promote new infectious disease epidemiology theory to account for individual variation in characteristics that are under selection, especially when selection forces are dynamic. These characteristics may not be heritable, in which case selection affects each generation while being invisible to current evolutionary theory, which to some extent also needs to be re-examined. More generally, whether we refer to populations of humans, animals, microbes, or cells, the idea that in every observational or experimental study there is always a degree of unobserved heterogeneity that can reverse the direction of our conclusions is unsettling, but the issue can be tackled by general mathematical formalisms that account for it combined with study designs that enable its estimation.
    Ten years ago, I encountered a concept that transformed the way I think about populations. The idea of frailty variation was introduced in demography 40 years ago to describe variation in individual longevity. As the frailest individuals are removed earlier from a heterogeneous cohort, death rates decline over time creating an impression that individual longevity is increasing even when it is not. This is the simplest realisation of a phenomenon that has manifold manifestations in any study that involves counting the individuals that constitute a population over time, across environments or experimental conditions. It appears to explain a wide range of reported discrepancies between studies and contribute to resolve decade-long debates, such as why vaccines appear less efficacious where disease burdens are high, why mathematical models tend to overpredict the impact of disease control measures and whether niche mechanisms need to be invoked to explain the levels of biodiversity observed in nature. I have reformulated these and other problems and have been privileged to collaborate with colleagues around the world.


  • Caitlin Rivers

    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg SPH

  • Dr. Rivers is a Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on improving public health preparedness and response, particularly by improving capabilities for “outbreak science” and infectious disease modeling to support public health decision making.
    Dr. Rivers participated as author or contributor in influential reports that are guiding the US response to COVID-19, including National Coronavirus Response: A Roadmap to Reopening; A National COVID-19 Surveillance System: Achieving Containment; Filling in the Blanks: National Research Needs to Guide Decisions about Reopening Schools in the United States; and A National Plan to Enable Comprehensive COVID-19 Case Finding and Contact Tracing in the US. She is the lead author on the report Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors which is being used by, the National Governors Association, the state of Maryland, and the District of Columbia to guide reopening plans. In May 2020, Dr. Rivers testified in front of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies on the COVID-19 Response.
    Prior to joining the Center for Health Security in 2017, Dr. Rivers worked as an epidemiologist for the United States Army Public Health Center as a Department of Defense SMART Scholar. She also participated in a National Science and Technology Council’s Pandemic Prediction and Forecasting Science and Technology working group. Dr. Rivers serves as an Associate Editor of the journal Health Security.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Media, Social Media and COVID-19

What roles have media and social media played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus response and health after the pandemic.
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday April 23, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04232020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

    Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar will explore the roles that media and social media have played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath. Hosted in collaboration with WBUR.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence for negative health consequences of excessive exposure to media
  • Identify evidence-based recommendations for how media cover and report experiences such as COViD-19 pandemic
  • Name 7 traits of crisis news reporting that enhance its benefit to the public
  • Identify potential avenues of research about the association of media coverage and consumption on public health
  • Name 5 ways consumers can assess the trust-worthiness of media coverage

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Margaret Low

    Chief Executive Officer, WBUR
    Boston’s NPR News Station

  • Margaret Low is the CEO of WBUR, Boston’s NPR News Station. Low joined WBUR after five years at The Atlantic and before that a long and distinguished career at NPR. At WBUR, she leads one of public radio’s premier stations, with the biggest newsroom in the system. In addition to its rich local reporting, WBUR produces a slate of national programs, on air and online, that reach millions of people. Before joining WBUR, Low was a Senior Vice President at The Atlantic and President of its events division. AtlanticLIVE produces more than 100 editorial events a year across the country. Prior to The Atlantic, Low was NPR’s Senior Vice President for News, where she ran the award winning news division and the work of 400+ journalists. Low also spent nine years as NPR’s Vice President for Programming, where she developed the live events strategy for the hit show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and oversaw all program acquisitions including Car Talk and Fresh Air.


  • Roxane Cohen Silver

    Professor of Psychological Science, Medicine, and Public Health, University of California Irvine

  • Roxane Cohen Silver, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, the Department of Medicine, and the Program in Public Health at the University of California, Irvine, where she has been actively involved in research, teaching, mentoring and administration since 1989. An international expert in the field of stress and coping, she has spent the past three decades studying acute and long-term psychological and physical reactions to stressful life experiences, including personal traumas such as physical disability, loss, and childhood sexual victimization, as well as larger collective events such as war, firestorms, the Columbine High School shootings, the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and other community disasters across the world (including the 2010 8.8 earthquake in Chile and the 2006 destructive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia). Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the US Public Health Service. Since December 2003, Dr. Silver has served on numerous senior advisory committees and task forces for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, providing ongoing advice to DHS and its component agencies on the psychological impact of disasters and terrorism. She is also one of the founding Directors of Psychology Beyond Borders, an international nonprofit organization that facilitates research, intervention and policy development in the prevention, preparedness and response to terror attacks, conflict, or natural disasters across the world. Dr. Silver is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (in 4 Divisions) and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2007 Dr. Silver received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Service to Psychological Science and in 2010 she received the Public Advocacy Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (for “outstanding and fundamental contributions to advancing social understanding of trauma”). In 2011 she received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (Senior Career) and the Award for Outstanding Service to the Field of Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division 56 (Trauma Psychology).


  • Elana Newman

    McFarlin Professor of Psychology
    University of
    Tulsa

  • Elana Newman, McFarlin Professor of Psychology at the University of Tulsa, has conducted research on a variety of topics regarding the psychological and physical response to traumatic life events, assessment of PTSD in children and adults, journalism and trauma, and understanding the impact of participating in trauma-related research from the trauma survivor’s perspective. She is a past president of the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies, the world’s premier organization dedicated to trauma treatment, education, research, public policy concerns and theoretical formulation. Her work in journalism and trauma has focused on occupational health of journalists and she and her students have several studies underway examining the effects of journalistic practice upon consumers. She was the key investigator on the Dart Center’s research survey on photojournalists’ exposure to trauma. She co-directed the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma’s first satellite office in NYC after 9-11.


  • Mariette DiChristina

    Dean, Boston University College of Communication, Science journalist.

  • Mariette DiChristina is the dean of the College of Communication at Boston University and a nationally recognized science journalist. Before arriving in 2019, DiChristina was the editor-in-chief and executive vice president of Scientific American, as well as executive vice president, magazines, of the magazine’s publisher, Springer Nature. The first woman to head Scientific American since its founding in 1845, she led the editorial team to honors including the coveted National Magazine Award for General Excellence. In her Springer Nature role, she oversaw an editorial and publishing staff of more than 160 people across 10 countries. Previously, DiChristina served as president of the National Association of Science Writers and as executive editor of Popular Science, where she was named Editor of the Year by the magazine’s publisher, Times Mirror Magazines. She also served as a part-time associate professor and visiting scholar in the graduate Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism and a science writer in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Boston University recognized her work in 2016 with a Distinguished Alumni Award. Beyond her role as dean, DiChristina chairs the Steering Group for the “Top 10 Emerging Technologies” for the World Economic Forum and is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She served as a committee member of the Climate Communications Initiative for the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation advocating for federal funding of basic scientific research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

How has this pandemic sharpened our thinking around how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post COVID era?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and thinking on climate change
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, May 14, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 05142020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. The pandemic has sharpened our thinking and informed insights around climate change, impacting how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post-COVID era.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe health effects and their costs as a result of climate change
  • Name 5 interventions that benefit both health and climate
  • Name 3 lessons from COVID-19 experience that inform climate change action
  • Explain the influence of both COVID-19 and climate change on health inequity

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Mona Sarfaty

    Director, Program for Climate and Health, George Mason
    University

  • Mona Sarfaty, MD MPH FAAFP, is the Director of the Program on Climate and Health in the Center for Climate Change Communication. The Program collaborates with medical societies and research organizations to increase awareness, research, and preventive activity regarding the health effects of climate change. As a family medicine professor and physician for over 30 years, Dr. Sarfaty has engaged in research and teaching focused on primary care, cancer screening, and public policy, including the health effects of climate change. She has lectured at national and regional venues including medical societies, health plans, health departments, professional organizations, and government conferences. Dr. Sarfaty is the author of widely circulated guides and articles on how to increase cancer screening rates in practice and on improving practice outcomes by using the features of the patient centered medical home. Since 2003, Dr. Sarfaty has been on the faculty of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia as Associate Professor of Family Medicine. She has engaged in research, teaching, and patient care. She has held a joint appointment in the Jefferson School of Population Health. From 1992-2003, she was on the faculty of the George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center with a joint appointment in the GWU School of Public Health and Health Services. During her years at GWU, she was the Medical Director of the Montgomery County Cancer Crusade and the Primary Care Coalition of Montgomery County, and the Founding Director of the Community Oriented Primary Care Track of the MPH Program. From 1985-92, Dr. Sarfaty served as the Associate Director for Health Policy and Senior Health Policy Advisor for the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources (the principal authorizing committee in the Senate for health programs). She authored major pieces of legislation, planned hearings, and advised Senators on both sides of the aisle. Dr. Sarfaty has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians since 1980. She is a long time member of American Public Health Association (APHA), where she has served as Chair and Governing Councilor of the Medical Care Section. She also served on the Board of Directors for the Association of Prevention Teachers and Researchers (APTR), the professional arm of the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sarfaty is an invited member of the distinguished National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. She has received many awards for her work. Selected publications are listed below.


  • Renee Salas

    Yerby Fellow, Center for Climate, Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public  Health

  • Renee N. Salas, MD, MPH, MS is a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an emergency medicine physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). She received her Doctor of Medicine from the innovative five-year medical school program to train physician-investigators at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. She concurrently obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Research from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she received a Master of Public Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with a concentration in environmental health while completing a Fellowship in Wilderness Medicine at MGH. She now has a sole academic concentration on climate change and health. As a 2018 Burke Fellow, she is addressing the current research gaps in this field. She served as the lead for the 2018 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change U.S. Brief and is a nationally recognized leader on this subject.


  • Jalonne White-Newsome

    Senior Program
    Officer,
    The Kresge
    Foundation

  • Jalonne L. White-Newsome is a senior program officer at The Kresge Foundation, responsible for the Environment Program’s grant portfolio on Climate Resilient and Equitable Water Systems (CREWS). Jalonne is also a core team member of Kresge’s Climate Change, Health and Equity Initiative, supporting grantmaking across the public health sector. Before joining Kresge in 2016, Jalonne served as director of federal policy at West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. (WE ACT), where she led national campaigns to ensure that the concerns of low-income communities of color were integrated into federal policy, particularly on issues of clean air, climate change and health. She is an adjunct professor at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. As a researcher on climate, health and equity, Jalonne was a lead author for the human health chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. She provides leadership on various boards, including the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Change and Society, the US Climate Action Network, Health Environmental Funder’s Network Steering Committee and the Urban Water Funder’s Group. A native of Detroit, Jalonne earned a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Southern Methodist University and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University. Jalonne has recently been recognized by Who’s Who in America, The Environmental Management Association’s Environmental Achievement Award, the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and is a 2017 PLACES Fellow alum with The Funders Network.


  • Greg Wellenius

    Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Gregory Wellenius is an associate professor of epidemiology in the Brown School of Public Health. His research focuses on the environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, including in China. Much of his work has examined the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of cardiovascular events and its effects on cardiovascular physiology. In the context of these studies, he has used tools from the fields of epidemiology and toxicology to: 1) evaluate the association between environmental exposures and disease, 2) identify subgroups of the population that may be particularly susceptible, and 3) elucidate the physiologic mechanisms for the observed effects. Wellenius has served as a research consultant to the Chinese government’s Center for Disease Control (CDC), and is currently engaged with the Chinese CDC in collaborative empirical research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Health Literacy Response to COVID-19

How do we make sure everyone understands public health information during the time of a crisis?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community Health Workers and public health professionals working with medically underserved communities
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: July 22, 2020
    2:00 PM - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_07222020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites Basic understanding of COVID 19

About this Webinar

Accurate information is critical to control the spread of COVID 19. However, obtaining and understanding accurate information can be a challenge for populations of various health literacy levels which in turn can increase risk of illness. This webinar will discuss the challenges experienced by populations of various health literacy levels in obtaining important information about COVID 19 and strategies and resources on how to address the barriers and promote health equity.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how limited health literacy adversely affects access to accurate and reliable health information during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Apply health literacy and plain language principles to improve communication regarding COVID-19 and what to do about it
  • Identify resources and responses to the COVID-19 pandemic available for use to meet the health literacy, language and culture needs of diverse communities

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi is principal of Kurtz-Rossi & Associates, a women-owned business located in Boston, Massachusetts. Her work has two major sources of inspiration. One is the adult learners she works with to integrate health and literacy education in Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) settings and the other is all the teachers, librarians, and health professionals who are dedicated to improving access to health information and health services for multi-lingual and multi-cultural communities. As a health literacy consultant, Sabrina’s areas of expertise include:

  • Health literacy professional development teaching and training
  • Plain language writing and editing
  • Easy-to-read materials and website development
  • ABE and ESOL health literacy curriculum development
  • Evaluation to assess effectiveness and for program improvement
Ms. Kurtz-Rossi is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Health Literacy Leadership Institute at Tufts University School of Medicine. She is also an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University and University of New England where she teaches online health literacy and plain language graduate level courses.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

About this Webinar

Instead of an all-or-nothing approach to risk prevention, we need an approach that allows people to live their lives while reducing their risk.  What does harm reduction look like for the coronavirus?

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the principles of harm reduction as a public health approach
  • Apply the principle of harm reduction to the current COVID -19 pandemic
  • Discuss the intersection of harm reduction and institutional racism

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Linette Liebling, MSPH

Linette Liebling, MSPH, has worked as a Public Health educator for over three decades. Ms. Liebling trains CHWs, clinic and hotline counselors, case managers, school health educators, youth workers, and other community health educators on strategies of behavior change as well as various sexual health topics. She is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Psychology Department at Wheaton College where she has taught since 2006.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Control and Prevention Strategies in Epidemics

How do we get to the end of the outbreak? Learn how to monitor and follow outbreaks once control measures are in place.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 22, 2020
    2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_06222020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

For all outbreaks, the notion is to “break the chain” and to break it in as many places as possible. These processes have to balance civic liberty, community motivation and ownership, as well as economic stability. We will look at both nonpharmaceutical interventions for pandemic control, including physical distancing and contact tracing, and the promise of vaccination and case management tools, such as drugs, that influence the course and outcome. We will discuss monitoring and following outbreaks to assess the adequacy of control measures and the trade-offs, and use stories from Ebola, COVID-19 and other outbreaks to illustrate these concepts.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe purpose of outbreak response.
  • Describe factors that influence the decision to implement control measures.
  • Describe common response and control measures used during outbreaks and emergencies.
  • Define appropriate interventions for different modes of transmission.
  • Discuss the importance of monitoring the effectiveness of outbreak response.
  • Name 2 indicators to monitor the effectiveness of outbreak response.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sharon McDonnell
    Sharon McDonnell, BSN, MD, MPH

Sharon received her BSN at the University of Florida and MD from the University of California, San Diego. After training in Family Medicine, she went to Pakistan/Afghanistan to work with NGOs and then WHO. She joined the US CDC as an EIS Officer and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health. She has worked in the state health departments in Florida and Vermont. After CDC She was on Faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and has continued to do work in International Disease Surveillance and Response and Epidemiology Training. She worked in Liberia for 2 years for the Ebola response with IRC and CSTE/CDC. Currently she teaches epidemiology with the University of New Hampshire and consults with the Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the Maine Medical Center. She helps co-found the Yarmouth Community Coronavirus Task Force in Yarmouth Maine.

  • Katherine Nenninger
    Katherine Nenninger, MD

Katherine went to medical school at the University of Virginia and completed an internal medicine residency at Maine Medical Center. She is currently in the Leadership in Preventive Medicine Fellowship training program through Maine Medical Center, which is a training program that includes public health coursework through the University of New England, clinical healthcare, and projects related to population medicine.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars