Mental Health

Courses with keyword "Mental Health"

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 26, 2024
    2:00 - 3:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: Pending

    Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center is an approved provider with distinction of nursing continuing professional development by the Northeast Multistate Division Education Unit, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. 1.0 Contact Hours Activity Number: 1557 This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Southern NH AHEC and The New Hampshire Public Health Association. The Southern NH AHEC is accredited by the NH Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA category 1 Credit (s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. For other professionals: 1.0 professional hours of continuing education.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

Workplace violence encompasses a range of behaviors that involve acts or threats of violence towards employees occurring within the workplace. These behaviors can include verbal abuse, bullying, harassment, physical assaults, and even the extreme act of homicide. Data reveals that healthcare workers face a significantly higher risk of encountering workplace violence compared to workers in other industries. This alarming statistic indicates that healthcare professionals are five times more likely to experience such incidents. A recent survey conducted by National Nurses United in 2022 further supports this concerning trend, with 40 percent of hospital nurses reporting an upsurge in violent episodes within their workplace. In this session, the speaker will discuss types of violence, risk factors, preventive measures, and de-escalation techniques and tips.


What you'll learn

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify each of the four major types of inpatient violence
  • Discuss strategies to manage each major type of violence
  • Employ at least two strategies to manage each major type of violence


This webinar is recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar. "


Subject Matter Expert

  • Jeffrey Fetter

    Dr. Jeffrey Fetter

    Chief Medical Officer New Hampshire Hospital Assistant Professor of Psychiatry Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Jeffrey C. Fetter, MD attended Johns Hopkins University, received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, completed a combined residency in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and is board certified in psychiatry and internal medicine. Dr. Fetter also completed the University of New Hampshire Physician Leadership Development Program. He is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth who has focused his career on addressing clinical care at the interface of psychiatry and general medicine. Dr. Fetter began his practice at New Hampshire Hospital, as a staff psychiatrist leading a psychiatric team treating medically ill patients, and a multidisciplinary Cardiometabolic Consultation Service. He moved to Concord Hospital where he headed the Consultation-Liaison Service, but also practiced in the Emergency Department, ECT service, inpatient unit, and a cardiometabolic psychiatry clinic. As Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at the NH Department of Corrections he oversaw primary care of over 2000 inmates in three prisons and three halfway houses. He managed a substantial influenza outbreak in 2015, and established a prison hospice program. He also practiced psychiatry in the Residential Treatment Unit and the Special Housing Unit (solitary confinement). At Riverbend Community Mental Health Center, Dr. Fetter served as CMO overseeing psychiatric care in settings including the Community Support Program, integrated primary care/mental health settings, and residential services. He provided direct patient care on the ACT team. He led the agency’s response to the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently CMO of New Hampshire Hospital, Dr. Fetter is responsible for oversight of clinical services. He participates in educational programs for trainees and staff and has been active in the NH state mental health system’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Fetter has published several articles on clinical and public health management of COVID-19 in community mental health and psychiatric hospital settings. Dr. Fetter is the recipient of the Abraham Lenzner, MD Award in Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, the Association of Medicine and Psychiatry’s Martin Fenton, MD Award, the NH Public Health Association’s Friend of Public Health Award, the NH Psychiatric Society’s Leadership Award in 2021, and the National Alliance for Mental Illness’ Exemplary Psychiatrist for 2023. He is also a scout leader and plays fiddle in an old-time string band.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: ST Promotion

Using Leadership Tools to Overcome Trauma in the Workplace, Part II: Teams and Cultures

What practical leadership principles can help you plan to rebuild a vibrant, caring and authentic culture in line with shared workplace values?

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 NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo   NCHEC Logo
          

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals concerned with building leaders and rebuilding teams and organizations, and influencing a resilient workplace culture
  • Format: 2-Part Webinar Series
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, May 3, 2022
    1:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05032022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: How to Build Leaders and Use Leadership to Overcome Workplace Challenges: Part I: Approaching the Traumatized State of Public Health Professionals and Communities
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

As the public health workforce has suffered documented trauma and stress since 2020, there are many calls for rebuilding a resilient public health workforce. What known and practical leadership principles and techniques can we use as we rebuild? Part 2 of the two-part series will focus on strategies for individual and collective reflection, and explain concepts related to principles of team dynamics and organizational development and their place in leadership and building leaders. How can this help us build not just resilient workplaces, but also vibrant, caring, and authentic cultures where our workforces will want to stay?


What you'll learn

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Review key concepts related to team dynamics and organizational development
  • Name two examples of how tools have been used to improve workforce team dynamics
  • Describe how teams and organizations can use tools to create a vibrant, resilient, and equitable workplace


This webinar is recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar. "


Subject Matter Expert

  • Sadhana W. Hall
    Sadhana W. Hall
  • Sadhana Warty Hall’s commitment as both a teacher and practitioner of leadership reflects a deep dedication to justice and empowerment, both locally and globally. She has applied her experience in management and strategic thinking to community development at institutions ranging in location from New Hampshire and Vermont to Tuvalu, Armenia, and Bhutan. As the current Deputy Director of the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy at Dartmouth College, she manages overall operations. She conceptualized the curricula of high-impact co-curricular leadership and mentoring programs and now oversees them. In recognition of her work, Sadhana received Dartmouth College’s Sheila Culbert Distinguished Employee Service Award, the Australia Government’s Endeavor Executive Leadership Award to adapt and implement leadership curricula for Australian Indigenous communities, and acceptance into the Fulbright Specialist Program. Over the past few years, Sadhana has offered workshops and technical assistance to different technical sectors including health, engineering, entrepreneurship, and higher education. She is the co-author of Teaching Leadership: Bridging Theory and Practice (2018) and her second book, Leadership Blueprints: Adopt, Adapt, and Adjust was published in July 2021. Hall earned an M.A. in history from the University of Rajasthan, India and completed an M.P.H. in public health from the University of North Carolina in the United States.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Leadership

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals concerned with building leaders and rebuilding teams and organizations, and influencing a resilient workplace culture
  • Format: 2-Part Webinar Series
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 28, 2022
    12:00 pm - 1:00 pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_04282022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: How to Build Leaders and Use Leadership to Overcome Workplace Challenges: Part II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

As the public health workforce has suffered documented trauma and stress since 2020, there are many calls for rebuilding a resilient public health workforce. What known and practical leadership principles and techniques can we use as we rebuild? Part 1 of the two-part series will focus on strategies for individual and collective reflection, and explain concepts related to self-awareness and their place in leadership and building leaders. Practical self-reflection questions will be provided as well as examples of methods used by leaders and teams to engage the workforce in self-awareness work.


What you'll learn

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe concepts related to self-awareness and their place in leadership and building leaders
  • Describe why using self-awareness tools for building leaders is valuable in a time of workforce trauma, stress and burnout
  • Name two examples of how tools can be used individually or for a team


This webinar is recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar. "


Subject Matter Expert

  • Sadhana W. Hall
    Sadhana W. Hall
  • Sadhana Warty Hall’s commitment as both a teacher and practitioner of leadership reflects a deep dedication to justice and empowerment, both locally and globally. She has applied her experience in management and strategic thinking to community development at institutions ranging in location from New Hampshire and Vermont to Tuvalu, Armenia, and Bhutan. As the current Deputy Director of the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy at Dartmouth College, she manages overall operations. She conceptualized the curricula of high-impact co-curricular leadership and mentoring programs and now oversees them. In recognition of her work, Sadhana received Dartmouth College’s Sheila Culbert Distinguished Employee Service Award, the Australia Government’s Endeavor Executive Leadership Award to adapt and implement leadership curricula for Australian Indigenous communities, and acceptance into the Fulbright Specialist Program. Over the past few years, Sadhana has offered workshops and technical assistance to different technical sectors including health, engineering, entrepreneurship, and higher education. She is the co-author of Teaching Leadership: Bridging Theory and Practice (2018) and her second book, Leadership Blueprints: Adopt, Adapt, and Adjust was published in July 2021. Hall earned an M.A. in history from the University of Rajasthan, India and completed an M.P.H. in public health from the University of North Carolina in the United States.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Leadership

Park Rx: Exploring an Innovative Prescription Program


How are nature and human health linked? What role do public health and health care workers play in connecting patients and the general public to nature?

 MPHA Maine Public Health Association Logo NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health and health professions students and faculty, interested community members
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday 11th March, 12 – 1PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_03112021. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Partnership Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Power point
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Webinar

More than 100 million Americans suffer from a chronic disease, which are responsible for 7 in 10 deaths in the U.S. each year. Park Rx America began as a community health initiative that aims to prevent and treat chronic disease and promote wellness by prescribing and linking patients to their local parks. Now, their searchable park database links parks to clinic Electronic Health Records, and can be used by healthcare and public health professionals to share with patients in their community.


What you'll learn

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current epidemic of chronic disease, including physical and mental health diseases, and research about spending time in nature as beneficial for health
  • Review the planning, development, and implementation of Park Rx
  • Explain how health care and public health professionals can prescribe parks and utilize existing online databases for patient education
  • Learn about the Park Rx program in the Greater Portland, Maine-area


Subject Matter Experts


  • Dr. Stacy Beller Stryer

    Pediatrician and Associate Medical Director for Park Rx America

  • Dr. Stacy Beller Stryer is a pediatrician and associate medical director for Park Rx America, where she educates healthcare providers, schools, and park agencies on benefits of nature and nature prescriptions; and works with organizations and the core team to strategize ways to move this mission forward. She is a frequent speaker at conferences and other media outlets and has published on this topic. Dr. Beller Stryer previously served as a health promotion and disease prevention coordinator in the Indian Health Service and was a pediatric subject expert for an online health website, Revolution Health. She currently works with her local school system to increase awareness and promote outdoor classrooms and green schoolyards and serves on Governor Hogan's task force for "Project Green Classrooms.” She wants others to benefit from nature as much as she has through the years.


  • Courtney L. Schultz, Ph.D.

    Research
    Fellow for
    Park Rx
    America

  • Courtney L. Schultz, Ph.D. is the Research Fellow for Park Rx America. Dr. Schultz is a social science researcher with an expertise in the design and execution of behavioral research across the lifespan focusing on integrating nature exposure into a salutogenic healthcare approach. In addition to her work with Park Rx America, Dr. Schultz is the Executive Director of Health and Technology Partners LLC, a consulting firm dedicated to improving wellbeing through cooperative partnership with healthcare providers, communities, and natural resources; Adjunct Faculty at the University of Missouri; and sits on the advisory board for the SHIFT Emerging Leaders Program and Hike it Baby. Dr. Schultz holds a Ph.D. in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management from NC State University, along with a BS and a MS in Parks and Recreation Management from the University of Missouri.


  • Jessica Burton

    Executive Director of the Southern Maine Conservation Collaborative

  • Jessica Burton has been the Executive Director of the Southern Maine Conservation Collaborative (Collaborative) since its founding in 2012. The Collaborative works as a network of land and water conservation organizations in Southern Maine and seeks to build strategic partnerships to expand conservation's reach for greater relevance and healthier communities. Over the last year, with support from NEPHTC and in partnership with the University of New England, the Collaborative has started a Park Rx program in Portland, Maine.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Mental Health

Course Information

  • Audience: Nurses, Community health workers, Public health professionals, Health services managers
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: April 14, 2021
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_SC.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course. 

    This activity has been approved by the Rhode Island State Nurse’s Association Educational Unit, an accredited approver of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Association Center’s Commission on Accreditation (Approval # 343-041323-36). In order to receive credit for this offering, you must review the entire presentation and complete the evaluation. Your certificate will be provided electronically within 7 business days to your provided email address.
    There is no conflict of interest for the presenter or anyone affiliated with the content of this presentation. There is no commercial support by any company for this offering. One must complete the evaluation by 04/14/2022 in order to receive credit.

  • Competencies: Community Partnership Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:PowerPoint slides
  • Pre-requisites None


About this Webinar

This webinar will explore historically relevant, disruptive events and the people who endured them, revealing personal attributes and team dynamics. The instructor will suggest anger management and de-escalation tactics to consider, as colleagues and clients continue to experience high levels of frustration and stress. The webinar will identify risk factors for burn-out that occur in teams in relentlessly challenging circumstances. Applying Nursing principles and providing examples to right-size one’s perspective, the webinar will help fight burnout, and help public health professionals remain true to the purpose of the profession.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the origins of anger and disruptive behavior among colleagues and clients
  • Identify risk factors for burn-out within yourself and your team
  • Articulate potential consequences and resolutions for unchecked stress
  • Create a personal and/or team-oriented care plan to improve staff fulfillment

Subject Matter Expert

  • Leigh Hubbard
    Leigh Hubbard,
    Clinical Manager
  • Leigh Hubbard is the Clinical Manager at Open Door Health, Rhode Island’s first Ambulatory Health clinic dedicated to providing gender affirming care to the LGBTQ community. Her prior work included surgical services, program development and management, regulatory readiness, and ambulatory care and management. She has also worked in surgical intensive care, neurosurgery, oncology, and women’s health. She finds great joy in smoothing transitions within healthcare through process improvement and helping to guide RNs and other healthcare staff members through unsure, challenging circumstances. She feels that “professional growth spurts” abound when a person or team is tested and perseveres.
    Leigh Hubbard is also the President of the American Nurses Association in Rhode Island. She chairs the government affairs committee. She is on the board of Directors of Rhode Island Action Coalition and the current medical consultant for the University of Rhode Island Childhood Development Center. She is a founding member of Mainstay RI, a small think tank dedicated to opioid overdose care redesign. She is an active member of Grace Episcopal Church in Downtown Providence, where she (used to) sing soprano in the choir.



    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Mental Health

Building Community through Outdoor Activities: Teenagers During Physical Distancing

How can outdoor time, either at home or at school, enhance social and emotional learning and build a sense of emotional well-being and belonging?

MPHA Maine Public Health Association Logo   NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center LogoNCHEC CHES Logo

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professional, educators
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: September 21, 2021
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_09212020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

As the Coronavirus impacts our lifestyles, schools are pivoting to prioritize children’s health and well-being above academic considerations. Access to the outdoors during the school day, through co-curricular activities, at home and within a community is part of a systemic approach to Social and Emotional Learning and addresses critical issues of public health.

Outdoor activities are a great way to address the five core competencies of social and emotional learning while increasing self-esteem, improving mood and reducing anxiety. This session highlights the benefits of spending time outdoors and offers a series of physically distanced activities that build Self-Management, Self-Awareness, Social Awareness, Relationship Skills and Responsible Decision Making.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the benefits of outdoor time
  • Learn strategies and activities to support SEL in the outdoors
  • Know how to do an inventory of outdoor spaces for learning
  • Consider partnering or hosting an outing club for your community

Subject Matter Expert

  • Alicia Heyburn
    Alicia Heyburn, MS
  • Alicia Heyburn is Executive Director of Teens to Trails, a non-profit working throughout Maine to connect high school students with life changing outdoor experiences. She is a Registered Maine Guide, Wilderness First Responder, and co-leader of The Ladies Adventure Club, an outing club for Maine women.  Here is an article of the work Teens to Trails is doing in Brunswick, ME.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Mental Health

The Next Normal: Mental Health


Stigmatization is a major issue that underlies the high prevalence and inadequacy of treatment of mental health problems. In addition, research has identified social isolation as one of the major contributors to mental health problems. How can public health practitioners contribute to the destigmatization of mental health problems and to decreasing social isolation through programs and policies that promote human connection and support in their communities?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, November 16th, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNMH.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic was coupled with an increase in poor mental health and substance use worldwide. How will we address mental health moving forward given what we learned during the pandemic? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss mental health as a public health problem in the US, even prior to COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Describe sources of psychologic distress during the pandemic and resulting effects on mental health problems in particularly affected populations
  • Discuss the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of Black Americans and persons with disabilities and strategies to address it going forward
  • Discuss systems-level barriers to accessing mental health services that must be addressed
  • Identify 4 specific actions that can be taken to improve the “next normal” in public mental health"


Moderator

  • Deborah Becker

    Lynn Jolicoeur
    @LMJOLICOEUR

    Producer and Reporter, WBUR

  • Lynn Jolicoeur is a senior field producer, reporter and editor at WBUR. As field producer, she researches and writes host interview segments and feature stories on a vast array of topics for the signature early-evening news program, All Things Considered. Lynn also reports for the station’s local broadcasts (with some stories airing nationally on NPR, as well). She has developed beats covering mental health and homelessness, and most recently she’s reported on the pandemic’s impact on both. Lynn is particularly passionate about reporting on the issue of suicide. In 2015 she produced and reported a 15-part, yearlong series on the suicide crisis. She has reported in depth on efforts to end chronic homelessness and weaknesses in the system for sheltering and housing adults experiencing homelessness. Prior to working at WBUR, Lynn was a television reporter for 18 years – most recently at Boston’s WCVB-TV Channel 5. She covered areas from crime and the justice system to politics, medicine, and social issues.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • M. Daniele Fallin

      M. Daniele Fallin
      @FALLINDANI

      Chair, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    • M. Daniele Fallin, PhD, studies how environments, behaviors, genetic variation, and epigenetic variation contribute to risk for psychiatric disease, with a focus on autism.

    • Briana Mezuk

      Briana Mezuk
      @UMICHSPH

      Director, Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan

    • Dr. Mezuk is the Director of the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health and is an Associate Chair in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She is a psychiatric epidemiologist whose research focuses on understanding the intersections of mental and physical health. Much of her work has examined the consequences of depression for medical morbidity and functioning in mid- and late-life, with particular attention to metabolic diseases such as diabetes and frailty. She is also the Director of the Michigan Integrative Well-Being and Inequalities (MIWI) Training Program, a NIH-funded methods training program that supports innovative, interdisciplinary research on the interrelationships between mental and physical health as they relate to health disparities. She is committed to translating research into practice, and since 2013 has collaborated with partners at the YMCA on evaluating and augmenting their diabetes self-management programming to incorporate psychosocial aspects of health. Finally, she writes a blog for Psychology Today called “Ask an Epidemiologist."

    • Courtney Thomas Tobin

      Courtney Thomas Tobin
      @DRTHOMASTOBIN

      Assistant Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health

    • Dr. Thomas Tobin is trained as a medical sociologist and use mixed-method and transdisciplinary approaches to examine psychosocial sources of risk and resilience and their impact on the psychophysiological health of Black Americans across the life course. Summary of Research: A central focus of Dr. Thomas Tobin’s research is the conceptualization and assessment of race-based stress and coping experiences among the U.S. Black population. In one study, Dr. Thomas Tobin found that experiencing subtle or ambiguous discrimination increases Blacks’ risk of poor psychological and physiological functioning and may be more detrimental than more blatant discriminatory treatment. This work motivated the development of Dr. Thomas Tobin’s “Racial Self-Awareness Framework of Race-Based Stress, Coping, and Health,” which clarifies environmental, sociocultural, and behavioral health processes by spotlighting “racial self-awareness” (RSA), the heightened sense of awareness of one’s racial minority status within a majority context. Results from a recent qualitative study suggest that (1) RSA represents additional cognitive effort that is physically and emotionally taxing, (2) RSA shapes Blacks’ perceptions of and responses to general and race-based stressors, and (3) Blacks employ a range of behavioral coping strategies to reduce the strain of RSA.

    • Katie Wang

      Katie Wang
      @YALESPH

      Assistant Professor,
      Yale School of
      Public Health

    • Dr. Wang’s research broadly focuses on the role of stigma as a psychosocial determinant of mental and behavioral health disparities among diverse marginalized populations. She received a K01 mentored scientist career development award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to investigate the associations among mental illness stigma, emotion dysfunction (i.e., intense, prolonged negative affect and/or difficulties in regulating one’s emotions), and substance use among adults with depression. Some methodological approaches utilized to accomplish this research include psychophysiological assessments (e.g., heart rate variability, salivary cortisol) and ecological momentary assessment (e.g., daily diaries). Dr. Wang is also involved in a number of projects that examines the health inequities facing people with disabilities, including a mixed-method study on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the disability community.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II

How can public health practitioners work with community partners to address underlying causes (social determinants) of trauma in their community?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how trauma (interpersonal, collective, cultural, and experience of loss) can be seen as a social determinant of health
  • Explain race and racism as a risk factor for trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Describe prevalence and predictors of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among youth based on results of Maryland Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  • Discuss non-uniform policing practices as a contributor for trauma as a social determinant of health

Moderator

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Jaimie Gradus
    @JAIMIEGRADUS

    MODERATOR Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus’s research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Maryam Jernigan-Noesi

      Maryam Jernigan-Noesi
      @JERNIGMA

      Founder, Jernigan & Associates Psychology and Educational Consulting

    • Addressing the needs of diverse youths, adults, and families has been the primary focus of Dr. Jernigan-Noesi’s work as a clinician and scholar. She recognizes that not all traditional psychological approaches that serve to meet the needs of some, are effective for persons from all backgrounds. Dr. Jernigan-Noesi prides herself on the integration of context, culture, and social factors that may influence health and wellbeing. Clinically, Dr. Jernigan-Noesi has worked alongside a multidisciplinary team of health providers in inpatient and outpatient mental health, community, medical, and academic settings. She has extensive training in pediatric psychology and adolescent health, as well as specialized training in adult and family interventions. Dr. Jernigan maintains a private practice serving a diverse clientele with a range of clinical concerns including, but not limited to: treatment of eating and weight concerns, mood disorders, anxiety, trauma, grief and loss, relational concerns, and career coaching. She also provides couple counseling focused on major life transitions such as, marriage and parenting. Her approach to therapy utilizes an intersectional framework emphasizing the role of identity (e.g., racial identity, sexual identity, gender identity) and culture in mental health and wellbeing.

    • Renee Johnson

      Renee Johnson
      @RENEE_M_JOHNSON

      Associate Professor,
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    • Dr. Renee M. Johnson is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned her MPH and PhD at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and conducted post-doctoral studies at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. At Hopkins, she is core faculty with the Center for Adolescent Health and the Center for Injury Research & Policy. Dr. Johnson has more than 100 publications addressing adolescent health, and is on the editorial board for JAMA Pediatrics. Her areas of expertise include: substance use among adolescents and emerging adults; violence and injury prevention; and evaluating the public health response to the overdose crisis. Much of her work addresses how adversity and social inequity shape behavioral health. She works with behavioral surveillance data (e.g., CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use & Health), as well as with morbidity and mortality data (e.g., State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System, or SUDORS). Dr. Johnson is deeply engaged in training the next generation of public health professionals. She teaches a course on substance use epidemiology and directs a NIDA-funded training program for doctoral and post-doctoral students studying the epidemiology of substance use.

    • Emily Mendenhall

      Emily Mendenhall
      @MENDENHALL_EM

      Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

    • Emily Mendenhall, PhD, MPH is a medical anthropologist and Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She has published widely at the boundaries of anthropology, psychology, medicine, and public health and is the inaugural co-editor-in-chief of Social Science and Medicine—Mental Health. Dr. Mendenhall led a Series of articles in on Syndemics in The Lancet in 2017, and was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology. She has published several books, including Rethinking Diabetes: Entanglements with Trauma, Poverty, and HIV (2019), Syndemic Suffering: Social Distress, Depression, and Diabetes among Mexican Immigrant Women (2012), and Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives (2015). Her newest book is Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji.

    • John Pamplin

      John Pamplin

      @JOHNPAMPLINII

      Assistant Professor
      and Faculty Fellow,
      New York
      University

    • John R. Pamplin II is an “Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow” in the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress and with the Center for Opioid Epidemiology and Policy at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Dr. Pamplin’s research studies the consequences of structural racism and systemic inequity on mental health and substance use outcomes. His program of research includes work identifying the social and structural drivers of racial patterns in DSM diagnosed major depression, as well as work evaluating policy interventions for the opioid crisis in terms of their potential to either alleviate of exacerbate racial inequities in overdose and criminal legal system outcomes. Prior to joining NYU, Dr. Pamplin received his PhD in Epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public health, where he was a predoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology’s National Institute of Mental Health-funded Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program. Upon graduation, Dr. Pamplin received the Bill Jenkins Award (formerly the William Farr Award) for commitment to addressing the causes of social inequalities in health and promise in the field of Epidemiology. Dr. Pamplin also holds an MPH in Epidemiology from Columbia University, as well as a BS in Biology from Morehouse College, and currently serves as President of the Student and Postdoc Committee of the Society for Epidemiologic Research.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I

What are some opportunities for public health practitioners to contribute to the prevention of trauma and its after-effects in the community?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific types of primary, secondary, and tertiary systemic or community-wide prevention strategies for trauma
  • Discuss the impact of racism, in terms of policies and practices, microaggressions, and other types of discriminatory behaviors, resulting in “racial trauma”
  • Describe the complicated relationship between traumatic brain injury and opioid use disorder
  • List 9 physical health conditions shown to be associated with experiencing trauma
  • Discuss the link between trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and cardiovascular disease in women

Moderator

  • Paula Schnurr

    Paula Schnurr
    @VA_PTSD_INFO

    MODERATOR Executive Director, National Center for PTSD and Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine

  • Subject Matter Experts

    • Rachel Sayko Adams

      Rachel Sayko Adams
      @RSAYKO_ADAMS

      Senior Scientist,
      Inst. for Behavioral Health, Heller School for Social Policy Management
      Brandeis University

    • Rachel Sayko Adams, PhD, MPH is a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health at the Heller School for Social Policy & Management at Brandeis University and a proud alum of Boston University’s School of Public Health where she completed her Master’s in Public Health. She is a health services researcher with expertise examining co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions following traumatic brain injury in military/Veteran and civilian populations, with a particular focus on at-risk alcohol use and prescription opioid use. Dr. Adams is the Co-PI of the INROADS study at Brandeis, Intersecting Research on Opioid Misuse, Addiction, and Disability Services, which is examining the intersection between addiction, disability, and service provision in an effort to address the rise of opioid use disorders among people with disabilities, funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. She is a MPI of an R01 from the National Institute of Mental Health which is integrating data from the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration to enhance suicide prevention efforts for military members returning from deployments using machine learning. Dr. Adams has an appointment as a health services researcher with the Veterans Health Administration Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center in Aurora, Colorado.

    • Jennifer Sumner

      Jennifer Sumner
      @SUMNERSTRESSLAB

      Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology,
      University of California, Los Angeles

    • Dr. Jennifer Sumner is a clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is the Director of the Sumner Stress Lab at UCLA, and her program of research lies at the intersection of the psychological and physical health consequences of trauma exposure. The work of the Sumner Stress Lab examines how experiences of trauma and severe stress relate to accelerated aging and risk for chronic disease, with a particular focus on cardiovascular disease—the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The goal of this research is to delineate the pathways by which trauma and severe stress get embedded under the skin to contribute to poor health and to use this information to develop targeted interventions to offset risk for adverse health outcomes after trauma. Dr. Sumner received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Pomona College and her Masters and PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship program at the Charleston Consortium (Traumatic Stress Track) and received postdoctoral training as an Epidemiology Merit Fellow at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Prior to joining UCLA, Dr. Sumner was an Assistant Professor of Behavioral Medicine at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Medical Center.

    • Juliette McClendon

      Juliette McClendon
      @WEAREBIGHEALTH

      Director of Medical
      Affairs,
      Big Health
    • Kathryn Magruder

      Kathryn Magruder
      @MUSCHEALTH

      Professor, Medical University of South Carolina


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

The Health Consequences of War

How can an understanding of the range of war’s effects on refugees allow public health and healthcare practitioners in the US to provide appropriate and effective care for wartime refugees in our communities?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    


Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 29th, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HCW
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

As the war in Ukraine unfolds, the world is beginning to bear witness to the consequences being experienced by the Ukrainian people. This Conversation brings together experts who have studied other conflicts to discuss what we know about the long-term effects of war on the health of populations.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the effects of war on the mental health of children, youth, and families and types of interventions that have shown to be effective in addressing those effects
  • Describe the challenges to and lessons learned from providing nutritional support and medical care to persons in the Syrian conflict
  • Discuss the impact of violence on health care providers and facilities in Ukraine, as well as historical experience of prior conflicts (Afghanistan, sub-Saharan Africa)
  • Compare and contrast effects of conventional warfare (effects on battlefield relatively well understood) vs. “hybrid” warfare (effects on civilians and society; medical consequences unknown)

Moderator

  • Tiziana Dearing

    Tiziana Dearing
    @TIZIANA_DEARING

    Host, WBUR’s Radio Boston

  • Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston on WBUR. She’s been a commentator and contributor to WBUR for more than a decade, and has contributed to a number of other regional and national news outlets. Prior to joining the Radio Boston team, Tiziana was a professor at Boston College in the School of Social Work, where she taught social innovation and leadership. A longtime anti-poverty advocate, Tiziana also ran Boston Rising, a startup antipoverty fund to end generational poverty in Boston, and was the first woman president of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Boston. She’s won a number of awards in the city, including a Pinnacle Award from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Theresa Betancourt

      Theresa Betancourt

      Salem Professor
      in Global Practice,
      Boston College

    • Theresa S. Betancourt is the inaugural Salem Professor in Global Practice at the Boston College School of Social Work and Director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her primary research interest is to understand the protective processes that contribute to risk and resilience in the mental health and development of children and adolescents facing adversity in a variety of cultures and settings. Dr. Betancourt has led several initiatives to adapt and test evidence-based behavioral and parenting interventions for children, youth, and families facing adversity due to poverty, illness, and violence. Dr. Betancourt additionally focuses on strategies for scaling out these interventions using implementation science approaches. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Dr. Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence that can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in Rwanda. In the US, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. through the collaborative development and evaluation of parenting programs led by refugees for refugees that can be linked to prevention services involving refugee community health workers. Dr. Betancourt has served on the advisory board for the 2021 UNICEF State of the World’s Children report, titled, “On My Mind: Promoting, Protecting, and Caring for Children’s Mental health.” Additionally, she has advised Amnesty International on a key advocacy report on mental health in Sierra Leone entitled ““They are forgetting about us:” The Long-term mental health impact of war and Ebola in Sierra Leone.” Dr. Betancourt serves on a high-level World Health Organization Mental Health Gap Topic Expert Group (TEG), the Lancet Commission on Gender Based Violence and Maltreatment of Young People, as well as serve as a thematic advisor for the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) for a series of workshops on Violent Extremist Disengagement, Reconciliation, Trauma Recovery. Dr. Betancourt has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com, and in an interview with Larry King on the program, “PoliticKing.”

    • Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Doctor & Research Associate, King's College, London

    • Dr. AbdulKarim Ekzayez is a Syrian medical doctor specializing in epidemiology and health systems. His current work at King’s College focuses on health systems strengthening in conflict areas and on building the research and policy capacity of the health sector in conflict-affected areas of the Middle East. He is currently a lead applicant for a large project funded by the National Institute for Health Research called “Research for Health System Strengthening in Northern Syria R4HSSS”. He is also involved in several other projects and research with other academic and policy institutes including LSHTM, AUB, Chatham House and others. His research focuses on issues related to health system building in conflict settings and early recovery, health care protection challenges, and the health impact of conflict. In 2013, Karim was training to be a neurosurgeon when his residency was interrupted by the war. He joined Save the Children in North West Syria, where he led the health response until 2017 – helping build the primary health care system, restarting routine vaccinations, and supporting the rebuilding of the health system in northern Syria using a bottom up approach. Dr. Ekzayez is a regular contributor to several medical and civil society institutions in Syria, and has been active in advocacy for Syria through media and conferences. He is a trustee member of two NGOs, Shafak and Refugee Trauma Initiative and a managing director of the Syrian British Council which is a lobbying and advocacy body in the UK. He received his MD from Aleppo University and his MSc from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Also, he completed a one-year residential fellowship on leadership in international affairs from The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs at Chatham House; and another one-year fellowship in international cultural relations from the Institute for International Cultural Relations at The University of Edinburgh. He is also pursuing his PhD in public policy from King’s College London.

    • Larissa Fast

      Larissa Fast

      Doctor, Humanitarian and Conflict Studies, University of Manchester

    • Professor Fast is working at the intersection of the worlds of academia, policy, and practice. Her research addresses two fundamental problems: how best to protect civilians, particularly those who intervene in violent conflict, and how to make such intervention more effective, ethical, and responsive to local needs and circumstances. In addition to her book Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism, she has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and policy reports. Professor Fast worked for both government and non-government agencies as a project manager, consultant, and analyst, and provided training to individuals and organizations in peace building and conflict analysis. Prior to her current position at Manchester, she was a Senior Research Fellow at ODI’s Humanitarian Policy Group, a Fulbright-Schuman Research Scholar (2016-2017), and a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow (2014-2016) at USAID’s Global Development Lab. She has also held faculty positions at the Kroc Institute at the University of Notre Dame (USA) and Conrad Grebel University College (University of Waterloo, Canada).

    • Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Doctor & Senior University Lecturer, University of Gothenburg

    • Dr. Khorram-Manesh serves as university lecturer in surgery with particular focus on disaster medicine, mass casualty management and trauma. He is also a Visiting professor at numerous universities, currently the National Institute of Emergency Medicine of Thailand and Mahidol University in Bangkok. He has published over 100 papers, book chapters and books. His current research interests are in multiagency collaboration in emergencies, introduction of the Flexible Surge Capacity concept, Civilian-Military collaboration and its related challenges, development of emergency medicine in middle and low-income countries, hospital safety in disasters and public health emergencies. He is equally active in introduction of educational initiatives such as simulation trainings and exercises within the field of disaster and emergency medicine.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Course Information


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

In this workshop, Sonalis DeLeon will walk us through the importance of wellness and health as public health workers. She will be providing information on The Seven Dimensions of Wellness.


What you'll learn

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the concept of The Seven Dimensions of Wellness
  • Discuss how The Seven Dimensions of Wellness can help motivate and empower
  • Identify additional tools that CHW’s can use to enhance their practice

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sonalis DeLeon

    Sonalis DeLeon
    Program Coordinator,
    Office of Community Health Workers,
    Boston Department of Public Health

  • Sonalis De Leon is Hispanic and Puerto Rican and is the Community Health Worker Program Coordinator for the Department of Public Health. She has been a CHW for nine years and in the medical field for over 15 years. Her journey started at Baystate Health Systems, and from there, moved to Commonwealth Care Alliance Health Insurance. As a CHW, her passion is to help and improve the lives of those in need in our communities, by addressing their social determinants of health. Her main goal as a CHW is to impact people’s lives in a positive way and help them overcome any barriers to achieve a healthy life. “Diversity is not about how we differ. Diversity is about embracing one another’s uniqueness.” – Ola Joseph

  • Gail Hirsch

    Gail Hirsch
    Senior Advisor,
    Office of Community Health Workers,
    MA Department of Health

  • Gail Hirsch is the former Director, and currently Senior Advisor, to the Office of Community Health Workers at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, where she led state public health efforts to advance the CHW workforce for over 25 years. She is a founding Board member of both the Massachusetts Association of CHWs (MACHW) and the National Association of CHWs (NACHW), and served as Co-Chair of the national CHW Core Consensus (C3) Project Advisory Committee. She is a leader in CHW policy and organizing efforts in Massachusetts and nationally, and serves as an advisor to other states, federal agencies, and regional and national organizations. She is a steering committee member of the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) and has co-authored numerous reports and articles on state policy support for CHWs. She holds a Master’s Degree in Education.



    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement
    This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

    Acknowledgement: This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: MACHW

MACHW Workshops: From Tears to Cheers: A Story of Resilience

How has COVID-19 affected the mental health of community health workers across the state of Massachusetts? What might be the long-term effects of COVID-19 on the community health worker community?


NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo    MACHW Massachusetts Association for Community Health Workers Logo 


Register

Course Information


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

Dr. Johnson will present on the 10C’s model he develops for understanding intergenerational trauma, vicarious trauma, diversity, conflict, self and social transformation.  He will share how he use the 10C’s to help individual, groups, communities and organizations, acquire   the knowledge, skills and abilities to challenge internalize and systemic oppression, by being culturally competent while engaging in cross cultural relationships.  The model helps us understand the trauma, that cause the conflicts that are often faced during these experiences, that causes us to recognize and question power differences around race, culture, gender, class, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity.  The 10C’s model helps in understand the complex social and political meaning of what we call diversity.

The 10 Cs focus counseling is a process of helping clients reconnect, reclaim, redefine, and celebrate all aspects of who we are.  It is only by embracing all parts of ourselves that we can become whole empowered beings who can work to address the trauma and end the oppressions that hurt and divide us.


What you'll learn

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the 10Cs model and how it can help to build cross cultural relationships
  • Explain sources, symptoms, and the long and short term effects of trauma
  • Discuss epigenetics and the generational passing of trauma
  • Recognize Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome and the positive and negative adaptive behaviors that may result from it

Subject Matter Expert

  • Ulric Johnson

    Ulric Johnson

    Associate Director of Employee Assistance Program for City of Boston

  • Dr. Ulric Johnson is a community organizer focusing on the impact of “isms” and violence on youth, families, organizations and communities. He specializes in the impact of color, culture, class, character and context on individual and group behaviors, especially as it relates to the prevention, progression and treatment of what he refers to as addictive behaviors.

    He runs a private group practice Transformation Awareness Growth Vision. Where he and his associates provide cross cultural, anti-racism, mental health counseling, coaching and consultation, as well as the founder and director of Teens Against Gang Violence, a peer leadership, youth and family program.

    He’s the Associate Director for the City of Boston Employee Assistant Program, where he oversees the clinical services that the program provided for over 18,000 employees, and their families.

    Dr. Johnson is the former Assistant Dean/Campus Director of Springfield College: Boston Campus School of Human Services, Co-founder of the Peaceable Schools and Community Group, a former faculty member of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the Lesley College Center for Peaceable Schools and Communities.

    Dr. Johnson received his PhD in Cross Cultural Psychology from Southwestern University and his M.A in Psychology from Boston College.

    He is a Board-Certified Human Service Professional, Certified Addiction Specialist, Certified AIDS counselor, Certified Forensic Counselor, Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Licensed Mental Health Counselor, Licensed Rehabilitation Counselor, and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist.

    Dr. Johnson is a local, national, and international organizer, presenter, consultant and trainer on Cross Cultural and Multicultural communication and relationship, Gang Violence Prevention and Youth Leadership Development. He is actively involved in his local community in developing coalitions and collaborative work in bringing a multicultural approach to the issues of urban violence from a Public Health perspective.


    He refers to himself as an African Trin-Bagonian, because he is originally from Trinidad and Tobago. He presently lives in Dorchester, Boston MA.

    Quote: “Commitment is focus, strategy, determination, and consistency driven by love, and grounded in knowledge” From the “10C’s Model of Diversity Awareness and Social Change” By Ulric Johnson and Patti DeRosa

    • Terry Mason

      Terry Mason

    • Theresa (Terry) Mason is an experienced public health and policy researcher, policy advocate and activist based in Boston, Massachusetts. Her graduate degrees are in socio-cultural anthropology. Her studies focused on social and political movements for change and on race, class, and ethnicity in the U.S. For the past fifteen years she has specialized in policy research and development to promote and support advancement of community health workers as part of public health, health care and other community based teams. She began this work while on staff at the Massachusetts Public Health Association where she worked as part of the MACHW -led campaign to successfully pass legislation establishing voluntary state certification for CHWs. She volunteered to prepare CHWs to talk to their legislators and led meetings at multiple MACHW annual CHW advocacy days at the legislature. She also developed a training for CHWs to expand thinking about change beyond the individual to the community level. Terry has worked directly with CHWs in harm reduction work among drug injectors at risk for HIV/AIDs, organized health care providers nationally to advocate for changes in global HIV/AIDs financing, and worked as part of collaborations promoting sustainable financing of CHWs. She is a long-time climate justice advocate and has volunteered on many community and city change initiatives, as well as volunteering on campaigns for city, state, and national candidates who promote equity and social justice.



      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement
      This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: MACHW

MACHW Workshops: Exploring Mental Health Strategies to Cope with Everyday Stress

Feeling stressed? … Emotional fatigue?
Would you like to learn new science based skills and strategies proven to help you cope with everyday stress and anxiety?


NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo    MACHW Massachusetts Association for Community Health Workers Logo 


Register

Course Information


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

In this workshop, we explore the science of stress and anxiety. One of the impacts of the ongoing stress that many of us are experiencing as a result of COVID-19 is that we may feel like doing nothing, when actually doing something is critical for building resilience. We will explore how our science-based framework, TEB (thoughts, emotions and behaviors) can get us unstuck. We will then explore our science-driven skill “Charge Up” by practicing planning activities that charge up our “batteries” and can help us, and the individuals we work with, improve mental and physical health.


What you'll learn

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe what is happening in our brains when we experience stressful situations
  • Describe the difference between healthy and unhealthy levels of stress and anxiety
  • Explain how stressful situations can lead to “spinning cycles” of unhelpful thoughts, emotions, and behaviors
  • Describe how stressors can cause us to shut down and disengage
  • Explain how “Charge Up” can be used to help someone who is overwhelmed with stress and feeling stuck, disengaged, and drained of energy
  • List multiple examples of how to Charge Up
  • Describe the steps of Charge Up and how those steps could be applied


Moderators


  • Lisette Blondet

  • Lissette Blondet is the director of the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers (MACHW). She has dedicated most of her professional life to anchoring community health workers (CHWs) as public health professionals.
    In 1993, she founded the Community Health Education Center (CHEC), one of the first training and resource centers for CHWs in the country. CHEC’s standards for CHW curricula and core competencies have been replicated in other states. The program was so successful that in 1997, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health funded its expansion to the northeast region of the state. Both centers, CHEC Boston and CHEC Northeast are still thriving and have graduated over a thousand CHWs.
    More recently, Lissette provided technical assistance to the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund on community health and community health workers. She also previously served as Director of Community Benefits for Cape Cod Healthcare, focusing on making healthcare accessible to the underserved while building her experience in healthcare financing.
    As the director of MACHW, Lissette brings all her experience and skills to strengthen the association and strategically position the workforce to seize the many opportunities now available through health care reform, including reimbursement and broad recognition of the attributes and competencies of CHWs.


  • Jamie Berberena

  • Jamie Berberena is the Southeast Regional Leader and Advisory Board member with the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers. She is a passionate public health advocate focused on promoting racial equity throughout Massachusetts. With over a decade of experience promoting the health and well-being of diverse communities across Massachusetts by providing direct support and guidance through community-based programs, multi-disciplinary clinical programs and health policy initiatives.


  • Areliz Barbosa

  • Areliz Barbosa is a CHW and is the Regional Chapter Leader for Western Massachusetts for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.

Moderator


  • Ylira Pimentel

  • Ylira Pimentel, LICSW, currently works with MGH’s Community Psychiatry Program for Research in Implementation and Dissemination of Evidenced-Based Treatments (PRIDE) which spearheads efforts to bring evidenced-based practices and science-driven skills to organizations and communities. At PRIDE’s Training Institute she is a group coach for its Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) based TEB (Thoughts, Emotions, Behavior) curriculum. She has extensive experience working with diverse populations through administrative, clinical, and consulting roles in organizations such as Vinfen, BayCove, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)-Boston and MGH’s Chelsea Healthcare Center. She is also a part-time faculty member at Boston College School of Social Work, where she teaches Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. She holds an B.A. from Umass Boston, an M.S.W. and a certificate in child and adolescent trauma from Simmons College.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement

This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program”. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: MACHW