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Courses with keyword "Preparedness"

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III

How can data from both the micro (neighborhood and community) level and the macro (national, global) level be used effectively to inform and motivate policy change?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH3.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the creation of large national data platforms by combining health data, socioeconomic data, and climate change-related exposure data
  • Discuss the methodological issues in assessing the impact of climate-change exposures and health using large heterogeneous sources of data
  • Discuss evidence of climate change-related exposures and adverse health effects from 3 recent epidemiological studies using large national data sets

Moderator

  • Patrick Kinney

    Patrick Kinney
    @PATRICKKINNEY20

    Professor, Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Dr. Kinney joined the School of Public Health faculty in January 2017 as the inaugural Beverly Brown Professor of Urban Health. He was trained as an air pollution epidemiologist at Harvard School of Public Health, and came to BU after two decades at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. In his time at Columbia, he showed how warming temperatures make air pollution like urban smog worse, and more harmful to populations. He led the development of an integrated modeling system to predict the air pollution health effects of climate change into the future. Working at the intersection of climate change, health, and policy, Kinney has conducted research from the South Bronx to China to rapidly growing cities throughout Africa. At Columbia, he also created an interdisciplinary research and teaching program examining the potential impacts of climate change on health. At BU, Kinney is developing a new program that focuses on assessing the health benefits of urban climate action plans, via strategies to promote active transport, green infrastructure, and clean vehicles.

    Subject Matter Expert


    • Francesca Dominici
      @FRANCESCADOMIN8

      Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    • Francesca Dominici, PhD is the co-Director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative, at the Harvard University and the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Biostatistics, Population and Data Science at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the International Society of Mathematical Statistics. She is an expert in causal inference, machine learning, Bayesian statistics. She leads an interdisciplinary group of scientists with the ultimate goal of addressing important questions in environmental health science, climate change, and biomedical science. Her productivity and contributions to the field have been remarkable. Dominici has provided the scientific community and policy makers with robust evidence on the adverse health effects of air pollution, noise pollution, and climate change. Her studies have directly and routinely impacted air quality policy. Dominici has published more than 220 peer-reviewed publications and was recognized in Thomson Reuter’s 2019 list of the most highly cited researchers–ranking in the top 1% of cited scientists in her field. Her work has been covered by the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, BBC, the Guardian, CNN, and NPR. In April 2020 she has been awarded the Karl E. Peace Award for Outstanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society by the American Statistical Association. Dominici is an advocate for the career advancement of women faculty. Her work on the Johns Hopkins University Committee on the Status of Women earned her the campus Diversity Recognition Award in 2009. At the T.H. Chan School of Public Health, she has led the Committee for the Advancement of Women Faculty.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session II

How can community-based organizations work effectively with academic institutions to address the effects of climate change in their communities? 

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe effective advocacy strategies employed by a community group (GreenRoots in Chelsea/East Boston) to address air quality and other environmental concerns
  • List 4 principles to promote climate justice (i.e., address climate adaption for vulnerable people in vulnerable places)
  • Describe 4 examples of actions that that US cities can take to address climate change
  • Describe the goals, activities, and achievements of the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA)
  • Explain research approach and methodologies to understand how housing characteristics are related to health impacts of heat among vulnerable populations

Moderator

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma

    Amruta Nori-Sarma
    @ASANSREASON

    Assistant Professor,  Boston University School of Public Health

  • Amruta Nori-Sarma is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Health Department at Boston University School of Public Health, where she studies the relationship between environmental exposures associated with climate change and health outcomes in vulnerable communities. Her previous work has examined the impact of heat waves and air pollution on health in vulnerable communities in India, South Korea, and across the US. Her current research aims to understand the impacts of interrelated extreme weather events on mental health across the US utilizing large claims datasets. She also has an interest in evaluating the success of policies put in place to reduce the health impacts of climate change.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Marie S. O'Neill

      Marie S. O'Neill

      Professor,
      Department of Epidemiology,
      University of Michigan

    • Marie O’Neill (she/her/hers) has a B.A. from Brown University, an MS in Environmental Health Sciences from Harvard University, and a PhD in Epidemiology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Pan American Health Organization, and in Mexico at the National Institute of Public Health and the National Center for Environmental Health as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research interests include health effects of air pollution, temperature extremes and climate change (mortality, asthma, hospital admissions, birth outcomes and cardiovascular endpoints); environmental exposure assessment; and socio-economic influences on health. She served on the Federal Advisory Committee to the third National Climate Assessment. She is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences at University of Michigan School of Public Health and serves as Faculty Co-Lead for Diversity Equity and Inclusion at the School. She has been involved in several Federally funded research projects that address social disparities in climate effects on health, including a community-based participatory research project based in Detroit called Climate Hazards, Housing and Health.

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod

      Kathy Baughman McLeod
      @KBMCLEODFLA
      Director, Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, Senior Vice President Atlantic Council

    • Kathy Baughman McLeod leads the Center’s global strategy to reach one billion people worldwide with climate resilience solutions by 2030, with a special focus on society’s most vulnerable. She also chairs the Extreme Heat Resilience Alliance (EHRA), a global alliance of 40+ government officials, disaster relief organizations, climate scientists, public health and medical experts, businesses, and nonprofits, that is delivering early warning, policy, finance, and on-the-ground solutions, including appointing Chief Heat Officers in cities around the world. Additionally, she is spearheading the global push to name and categorize heat waves to save lives and build the culture of awareness and preparedness necessary to combat extreme heat. Kathy is currently a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Commission on “BiodiverCities by 2030” and a member of the Operating Committee of the Insurance Development Forum (IDF). Under her direction, Arsht-Rock is also a managing partner for the UN’s “Race to Resilience” campaign and Resilience Hub at COP26 — the UN’s flagship climate conference. Formerly, she served as Global Executive for Environmental and Social Risk at Bank of America, Managing Director for Climate Resilience at The Nature Conservancy — where she helped devise the world’s first insurance product on a natural asset; a 40 km stretch of the Mesoamerican reef in Mexico. She also served as Deputy Chief of Staff for the elected Treasurer/CFO of the State of Florida, where she was instrumental in making the Florida Treasury the first in the nation to publicly analyze and disclose the financial risks of climate. Kathy was also an appointed Florida Climate and Energy Commissioner. Baughman McLeod is the recipient of the Fuqua School of Business 2021 “Leader of Consequence” award and was appointed to the US Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council as its first-ever climate specialist in 2021. She holds an MBA from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and an MS in Geography from Florida State University.

    • Sharon Harlan

      Sharon Harlan

      Professor and Department Chair, Department of Health Sciences,
      Northeastern University

    • Dr. Harlan’s research explores the human impacts of climate change that are dependent upon people’s positions in social hierarchies, places in built environments of unequal quality, and policies that improve or impede human adaptive capabilities. Focusing on excessive heat and urban water systems as significant and increasingly critical threats to human health and well-being in cities, she studies social systems and landscapes that produce unequal risks for people in neighborhoods divided by social class and race/ethnicity. She has led multi-institutional, interdisciplinary research and community engagement projects that integrate social theories about the historical production of environmental injustices with data and models from the ecological, geospatial, and health sciences. She is currently conducting research on vulnerability to electrical grid failures and water affordability and accessibility in environmental justice communities across selected cities in the United States. Her coupled natural and human systems research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation on urban vulnerability to climate change, sustainability and water, the Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research program, and national and metropolitan area surveys on environmental attitudes and behaviors. She has served as an advisor on climate justice and social vulnerability to organizations such as the American Sociological Association, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Social Science Coordinating Committee of the U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program.

    • Roseann Bongiovanni

      Roseann Bongiovanni (CAS’99, SPH’01)

      @GREENROOTSEJ

      Executive Director, GreenRoots

    • Roseann Bongiovanni has worked for environmental justice for more than 25 years. Her extensive career began as a young organizer with the Chelsea Green Space Committee and included victories defeating the construction of a diesel power plant, and preventing ethanol “bomb” trains from traveling to a Chelsea Creek oil terminal. In 2016, Roseann transitioned this vital work into the independent environmental justice and public health organization, GreenRoots, which played a critical role in the response to COVID-19 in Chelsea and East Boston. Under her leadership, Chelsea was named a Culture of Health Prize Winner in 2017, GreenRoots was selected as a Social Innovator in 2018, and was named a US EPA Merit Award Winner in 2021. Roseann has raised and managed millions of dollars for major projects including Creekside Commons Park; federally funded air emissions reduction work, five urban growing spaces; murals and other public art projects; massive tree plantings; and multiple community parks. Roseann has received numerous awards for her work, including the Alternatives for Community and Environment Founders’ Award in 2001, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Hero Award in 2006 and the All Chelsea Award “Adult Resident of the Year” in 2007, an MLK Jr. Community Spirit Award by People’s AME Church in Chelsea in 2020 and a US EPA Merit Award in 2021. She has co-authored several publications. Roseann is a lifelong Chelsea resident, a former City Councilor, and City Council President. She has a Masters of Public Health from Boston University and is the mother of two strong-minded children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Climate and Health: What can we do today? Session I

How can public health practitioners communicate accurate information about climate change to individuals and communities to motivate action?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, March 18th, 2022
    9:00 AM – 9:45 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_CH1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session II
    Climate and Health:  What can we do today?  Session III
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Recent heat waves, wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events around the world underscore that climate change represents a clear and present danger. Communities everywhere need to better prepare for the extreme weather events we are experiencing today. But how does a community do this?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss intervention activities that can and should be done immediately for short-term and long-term impact
  • Describe connections between climate change impacts and social determinants of health resulting in health disparities
  • List 5 environmental potential contributors to adverse effects on the mental health of young people
  • Define the roles and responsibilities of the new federal Office of Climate Change and Health Equity

Moderator

  • Greg Wellenius

    Greg Wellenius
    @GWELLENIUS

    Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Gregory Wellenius, ScD leverages his training in epidemiology, environmental health, and human physiology to lead research focused on assessing the human health impacts of the built environment in the context of a rapidly changing climate. His team has made a number of notable contributions to our understanding of the health risks associated with air pollution, noise pollution, other features of our physical environment, and those posed by a changing climate. A key goal of his team’s research is to provide the actionable scientific evidence needed to ensure that our communities are as resilient, sustainable, and healthy as possible, emphasizing the benefits to human health of climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. Before coming to Boston University, Dr. Wellenius served as faculty and Director of Brown University’s Center for Environmental Health and Technology and Elected Councilor of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE). He has previously taught courses on epidemiology methods, climate change and human health, and methods in environmental epidemiology. He has a strong track record of mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Wellenius is the 2019 recipient of the ISEE Tony McMichael Mid-Term Career Award and the 2018 recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Brown University School of Public Health.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • John Balbus

      John Balbus
      @DRJBALBUS
      Interim Director, Office of Climate Change and Health Equity, US Department of Health and Human Services

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Annual Shine Lecture: Sheri Fink - Patient Rights in Emergencies: The Right to Treatment and the Right to Refuse Treatment.

Who should be part of the decision-making process for medical care allocation in an emergency? What is the appropriate role for the patients themselves? Who gets to make the final decision?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 13th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_ASLPRE.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Boston University School of Public Health’s Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights presents the annual Cathy Shine lecture. The lectureship honors the memory of Cathy Shine and her dedication to the rights of all those in need of care. This year’s event will feature author and filmmaker Sherri Fink. Her best-selling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital focused on the tough choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is also the co-creator and executive producer of the Emmy-nominated documentary series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common challenges to medical ethics and health equity
  • Discuss ethical framework for how to prioritize allocation of medical care in a crisis
  • Discuss the elements of a just decision-making process
  • Assess lessons learned from experience in 3 real-life cases (Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, COVID-19)

Moderator

  • George Annas

    George Annas
    @GEORGEJANNAS

     William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health


  • George J. Annas is William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University and Director of the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights at Boston University School of Public Health, and a member of the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at the School of Public Health. He is also a Professor at the School of Law and School of Medicine. He is author or editor of 20 books on health law and bioethics, including The Rights of Patients (3d ed 2004), Public Health Law (2d ed 2014), American Bioethics (2005), Worst Case Bioethics (2010), and Genomic Messages (2015). He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the co-founder of Global Lawyers & Physicians, a NGO dedicated to promoting health and human rights.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Sheri Fink

      Sheri Fink
      @SHERIFINK

      Author, Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

    • Sheri Fink is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital about choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is a co-creator and an executive producer of the Emmy-nominated Netflix documentary television series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak (2020), filmed the year prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. Fink contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the pandemic. Her and her colleagues’ stories on Ebola in West Africa were recognized with the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the George Polk Award for health reporting, and the Overseas Press Club Hal Boyle Award. Her story “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” co-published by ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine, received a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and a National Magazine Award for reporting. Fink is an adjunct associate professor at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. A former relief worker in disaster and conflict zones, she received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her first book, War Hospital: A True Story of Surgery and Survival (PublicAffairs), is about medical professionals under siege during the genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Five Days at Memorial was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for nonfiction, the Ridenhour Book Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Book Award, the American Medical Writers Association Medical Book Award, and the NASW Science in Society Journalism Book Award.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 2: How Do We Reduce the Risk of Another Pandemic and Also Prepare for Another?

How can we ensure that we prepare for the next pandemic by broadening the approach past the infectious disease scientists – i.e., by including political scientists, behavioral scientists, local public health practitioners, health educators, journalists, community leaders, etc?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, April 8th, 2022
    12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: SS1131137_PNP2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and  Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 1: What Did We Get Right and What Did We get Wrong?
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

COVID-19 has readily made the point that the era of infectious diseases is far from over. And there are good reasons to think that with increasing urbanization and climate change, more large outbreaks and pandemics are in store. As we move away from an emergency response to dealing with the lasting impacts of COVID-19, it is critical that we learn the lessons around what we did well and what we did poorly and develop clear plans for preventing, where possible, and mitigating the impact of, when not, any future pandemic. Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Disease Policy and Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 6 key elements of preparedness for a future pandemic
  • Identify priorities to strengthen global clinical research capacities
  • Identify current World Health Organization (WHO) activities intended to enhance surveillance, testing capacity, and public health intelligence
  • Describe inequitable access to COVID vaccine and ideas to improve equitable access to medical countermeasures in future pandemics
  • Describe ideas to improve health care system resilience in the event of a pandemic
  • Discuss ideas to improve population-scale risk modeling, analytics, and forecasting
  • Describe characteristics of rural communities that make them particularly susceptible to effects of pandemics

Moderator

  • Matthew Fox

    Matthew Fox
    @PROFMATTFOX

    Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Matthew Fox, (SPH’02,’07) DSc, MPH, is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health at Boston University. Dr. Fox joined Boston University in 2001. His research interests include treatment outcomes in HIV-treatment programs, infectious disease epidemiology (with specific interests in HIV and pneumonia), and epidemiologic methods. Dr. Fox works on ways to improve retention in HIV-care programs in South Africa from the time of testing HIV-positive through long-term treatment. As part of this work, he is involved in analyses to assess the impact of changes in South Africa’s National Treatment Guidelines for HIV. Dr. Fox also does research on quantitative bias analysis and co-authored a book on these methods, Applying Quantitative Bias Analysis to Epidemiologic Data (http://www.springer.com/public+health/book/978-0-387-87960-4). He is also the host of a public health journal club podcast called Free Associations designed to help people stay current in the public health literature and think critically about the quality of research studies (https://bit.ly/30fPApj) and a podcast on Epidemiologic Methods called SERious Epi (https://seriousepi.blubrry.net/). He currently teaches a third-level epidemiologic methods class, Advanced Epidemiology as well as two other doctoral level epidemiologic methods courses. Dr. Fox is a graduate of the Boston University School of Public Health with a master’s degree in epidemiology and biostatistics and a doctorate in epidemiology.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Krutika Kuppalli

      Krutika Kuppalli
      @KRUTIKAKUPPALLI

      Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations, Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention, Health Emergencies Program, World Health Organization


    • Krutika Kuppalli, MD, FIDSA is a Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations in the Department of Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention in the Health Emergencies Program at the World Health Organization. She completed her Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Diseases fellowship at Emory University, a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego and was an Emerging Leader in Biosecurity Fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Dr. Kuppalli currently serves on the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Trainee Committee and is the Chair of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Global Health Committee. Dr. Kuppalli was previously a Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellow and conducted research in Southern India to understand barriers to care and how emerging infections impacted individuals living with HIV/AIDS. She was the medical director of a large Ebola Treatment Unit in Sierra Leone during the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, helped lead the development and implementation of pandemic response preparedness activities in resource limited settings, and has consulted on the development of therapeutics for emerging pathogens. Her clinical and research interests focus on health systems strengthening in resource limited settings, research and clinical care for emerging infections, outbreak preparedness and response, and policy. She has worked in Ethiopia, India, Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Haiti.


    • Jeffrey Shaman
      Jeffrey Shaman

      Professor,
      Department of Environmental
      Health Sciences,
      Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


    • Jeffrey Shaman is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Director of the Climate and Health Program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. He studies the survival, transmission and ecology of infectious agents, including the effects of meteorological and hydrological conditions on these processes. Work-to-date has primarily focused on mosquito-borne and respiratory pathogens. He uses mathematical and statistical models to describe, understand, and forecast the transmission dynamics of these disease systems, and to investigate the broader effects of climate and weather on human health.

    • Megan Ranney

      Megan Ranney
      @MEGANRANNEY

      Professor of
      Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical
      School; Academic Dean, School of Public
      Health, Brown University


    • Dr. Ranney is an emergency physician, researcher, and national advocate for innovative approaches to public health. She holds the Warren Alpert Endowed Professor of Emergency Medicine at Alpert Medical School of Brown University and is Founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health. She is also the Academic Dean at the School of Public Health at Brown University. Dr. Ranney’s research focus is on developing, testing, and disseminating digital health interventions to prevent violence and mental illness. She has had continuous external funding from federal and foundation grants for over a decade, with over 130 peer-reviewed publications. She serves multiple national leadership roles, including co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor for AFFIRM at the Aspen Institute (http://www.affirmresearch.org), a non-profit committed to ending the gun violence epidemic through a non-partisan public health approach, and President of the Board of GetUsPPE.org, a start-up non-profit that delivered donated personal protective equipment to those who needed it most. She is a Fellow of the fifth class of the Aspen Institute’s Health Innovators Fellowship Program and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network. She has received numerous awards for technology innovation, public health, and research, including Rhode Island “Woman of the Year” and the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Policy Pioneer Award. She is also a frequent media commentator on outlets ranging from the BBC to CNN to the New York Times. Dr. Ranney earned her bachelor’s degree in History of Science, graduating summa cum laude, from Harvard University; her medical doctorate, graduating Alpha Omega Alpha, from Columbia University; and her master’s in public health from Brown University. She completed her residency in Emergency Medicine and a fellowship in Injury Prevention Research at Brown University. She was previously a Peace Corps Volunteer in Cote d’Ivoire. She lives in Rhode Island with her husband and two children.

    • Tara Smith

      Tara Smith
      @AETIOLOGY

      Professor of Epidemiology, Kent State University

    • Dr. Smith’s research generally focuses on zoonotic infections (infections which are transferred between animals and humans). She has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, focusing on the epidemiology and transmission of livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus and science communication. She has received over $3 million in funding from AHRQ, USDA, and NIOSH to carry out these studies. She has presented her research at numerous national and international platforms, including talks on Capitol Hill on the topic of agriculture and antibiotic resistance. Her work has been profiled in many major publications, including Science, Nature, and The New York Times, as well as in “Superbug: the Fatal Menace of MRSA” by Maryn McKenna and “Pig Tales: an Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat” by Barry Estabrook. Dr. Smith is also very active in science communication and outreach. She has written books on Group A Streptococcus, Group B Streptococcus, and Ebola. She also co-edited “Ebola’s Message,” published in 2016 with MIT Press. She writes about infectious disease for many outlets, including Slate, the Washington Post, SELF magazine, Quanta, NBC News, and Foreign Affairs. She serves as a member of the advisory board of the Zombie Research Society. She lives in rural Ohio with her partner and children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.


        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 1: What Did We Get Right and What Did We Get Wrong?

A major lesson learned from the COVID experience is how critical coordination and collaboration in all realms have been. How can public health practitioners and researchers promote that within and across disciplines to prepare for the next pandemic?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo   

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, April 8th, 2022
    10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: SS1131137_PNP1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 2: How Do We Reduce the Risk of Another Pandemic and Also Prepare for Another?
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

COVID-19 has readily made the point that the era of infectious diseases is far from over. And there are good reasons to think that with increasing urbanization and climate change, more large outbreaks and pandemics are in store. As we move away from an emergency response to dealing with the lasting impacts of COVID-19, it is critical that we learn the lessons around what we did well and what we did poorly and develop clear plans for preventing, where possible, and mitigating the impact of, when not, any future pandemic. Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Disease Policy and Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss lessons learned about the role of clinical research and clinical research infrastructure related to development and testing of COVID therapeutics and vaccine development
  • Describe current state of evidence of the origin of the COVID virus and the ramifications of understanding the specific origin
  • Describe how well lessons learned from previous infectious disease outbreaks (e.g., H1N1, SARS, Ebola) informed response to COVID
  • Discuss the ramifications of different societal approaches to COVID across the range of personal autonomy and responsibility through collective action

Moderator

  • Dr. Bhadelia

    Nahid Bhadelia
    @BHADELIAMD

    Director, Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research; Associate Director, National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories

  • Dr. Bhadelia is the founding director of BU Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research and an associate director of the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), a state-of-the-art maximum containment research facility at BU. She is a board-certified infectious diseases physician and an internationally recognized leader in highly communicable and emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) with clinical, field, academic, and policy experience in pandemic preparedness and response. Over the last decade, Dr. Bhadelia designed and served as the medical director of the Special Pathogens Unit (SPU), a medical unit designed to care for patients with highly communicable diseases, and a state designated Ebola Treatment Center. She has prior and ongoing experience in health system response to pathogens such as H1N1, Zika, Lassa fever, Marburg virus disease, and COVID-19 at the state, national, and global levels, including medical countermeasure evaluation, diagnostic positioning, infection control policy development, and healthcare worker training. Dr. Bhadelia serves on state, national, and interagency groups focused on biodefense priority setting, development of clinical care guidelines, and medical countermeasures research. She has served as a subject matter expert to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Defense (DoD), and World Bank.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Natalie Dean

      Natalie Dean
      @NATALIEXDEAN

      Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

    • Dr. Natalie Dean (CAS’09) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics and in the Department of Epidemiology at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health. She received her PhD in Biostatistics from Harvard University, and previously worked as a consultant for the WHO’s HIV Department and as faculty at the University of Florida. Her primary research area is infectious disease epidemiology and study design, with a focus on developing innovative trial and observational study designs for evaluating vaccines during public health emergencies. She has previously worked on Ebola, Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and now COVID-19. She received the 2020 Provost Excellence Award for Assistant Professors at University of Florida. In addition to research, she has been active in public engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is verified on Twitter with over 120k followers and has authored pieces in outlets such as the Washington Post, New York Times, and Stat News. Dr. Dean is also a proud alum of Boston University, receiving her bachelors in Biology and Mathematics/Statistics from the College of Arts and Sciences.

    • Angela Rasmussen

      Angela Rasmussen
      @ANGIE_RASMUSSEN

      Research Scientist, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan

    • Dr. Angela (Angie) Rasmussen, PhD is a virologist at the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on the role of the host response in viral pathogenesis, with a particular interest in emerging viruses that are or have the potential to be major threats to global health, such as avian influenza, dengue virus, Ebola virus, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2. Her work combines classical experimental virology and animal models with systems biology approaches to study the global response to infection and how that contributes to pathogenesis or protection from emerging pathogens. Dr. Rasmussen graduated from Smith College with a BA in Biological Sciences (2000) and received a MA (2005), MPhil (2006), and PhD (2009) in Microbiology and Immunology from Columbia University. She did her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington and previously held faculty positions at the University of Washington and the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health. In addition to her primary appointment at VIDO, Angie is also affiliated with the Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security. She is a member of the Verena Consortium, a multi-disciplinary, international effort to predict and study emerging viral pathogens, as well as the Communications Director for the CoVaRR-Net research consortium. She is also a member of the WHO Ad Hoc Expert Committee for Preclinical Models of COVID-19 and sits on the Editorial Boards at Vaccine, mSphere, and Cell Reports. In addition to her research, Dr. Rasmussen is a prolific science communicator on both social media and in the mainstream press, as well as a writer for numerous publications including Forbes, Leaps.org, Slate, Foreign Affairs, the Washington Post, and the New York Times. She is passionate about advocating for equity in biomedical research and public health, and is a member of the US NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Changing the Culture to End Sexual Harassment, as well as a faculty mentor for the volunteer science education group Wearing is Caring. She believes strongly that biosecurity and global public health must be collaborative international efforts and is eager to extend this outreach work in Canada and abroad.

    • Maria Sundaram

      Maria Sundaram
      @MARIASUNDARAM
      Associate Research Scientist, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute

    • Maria Sundaram, MSPH, PhD is an infectious disease epidemiologist and Associate Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health at the Marshfield Clinic Research Institute. Her research focuses on respiratory viruses and the vaccines that prevent them, as well as vaccine promotion and policy. Her research has included estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness with the CDC-based US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network, and describing the epidemiology of RSV in young children and older adults in rural areas. More recently, her research showed COVID-19 testing inequities had the potential to create bias in COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness estimates. She is also a weekly guest expert on the BBC World Service’s radio program Outside Source, where she answers listener questions about SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, and vaccines.

    • Rajeev Venkayya

      Rajeev Venkayya
      @RVENKAYYA

      Chief Executive Officer, Aerium Therapeutics; Board Member, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI)

    • Dr. Rajeev Venkayya is the CEO of Aerium Therapeutics, a venture-backed co. developing therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses with pandemic potential. He was the President of the Global Vaccine Business Unit at Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd, a position he held until February 2022, where he led a vertically-integrated business developing vaccines for dengue and Zika. He also oversaw partnerships with the Japanese Government to supply COVID-19 and pandemic influenza vaccines. Dr. Venkayya serves as an independent member of the board of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. While at Takeda, he served as a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) Leadership Team, a public-private partnership to prioritize and speed development of the most promising treatments and vaccines. Prior to joining Takeda, Venkayya served as director of Vaccine Delivery at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Program and served on the board of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Before that, he was special assistant to the president for Biodefense at the White House. In this capacity, he oversaw US preparedness for bioterrorism and biological threats and was responsible for the development and implementation of the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza. Venkayya trained in pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also served on the faculty. He was resident and chief medical resident in internal medicine at the University of Michigan.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement

        This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.


Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Hospitals and Healthcare

How can individuals be empowered and motivated to participate in optimizing their own health? What can be the role of public health practitioners?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    


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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, December 2nd, 2021 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.25 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_NNHH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • CompetenciesCommunity Partnership Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Domestically and globally, healthcare systems were overwhelmed by the COVID-19 pandemic. What have we learned from the pandemic about how care is delivered and how our systems can be improved to better deliver efficient and high-quality care? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe factors that influence the variability in charges for services across hospitals
  • Describe major short-term and long-term consequences of COVID on hospitals and patients
  • Explain concept of “coproducing” health (empowering people to engage with their own health) - and lessons learned from COVID experience that may promote it
  • Discuss the role of community health centers, the impact of COVID on them, and challenges to adapting going forward


Moderator

  • Reed Abelson

    Reed Abelson
    @REEDABELSON

    Reporter, The New York Times

  • Reed Abelson has been a reporter for The New York Times since 1995. She currently covers the business of health care, focusing on health insurance and how financial incentives affect the delivery of medical care. She witnessed the Affordable Care Act become law and is actively keeping an eye on what happens next. Before she began covering health care in 2002, Ms. Abelson covered a broad range of topics, from the collapse of Enron to the oversight of charitable organizations to accounting to personal investing. Before joining The Times, Ms. Abelson was a staff writer for Smart Money from 1993 to 1995, where she wrote in-depth investing features. From 1990 to 1993, she was a reporter for Forbes, where she profiled public and private companies. She began her journalism career as a reporter at the Philadelphia Business Journal, where she covered health care, venture capital, technology and the ports of Philadelphia. She graduated cum laude from Bryn Mawr College in 1983 with an A.B. in English literature, and she earned an M.A. in English literature from Columbia University in 1984.


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Ge Bai

      Ge Bai
      @GEBAIDC

      Associate Professor of Practice, John Hopkins Carey Business School
    • Ge Bai, PhD, CPA is an Associate Professor of Accounting at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and an Associate Professor of Health Policy & Management (joint) at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has received the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association’s Excellence in Teaching Award. An expert on health care pricing, policy, and management, Dr. Bai has testified before House Ways and Means Committee, written for the Wall Street Journal, and published her studies in leading academic journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Health Affairs. Her work has been widely featured in ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox News, Los Angeles Times, NBC, New York Times, NPR, PBS, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media outlets and used in government regulations and congressional testimonies.

    • Jerome Dugan

      Jerome Dugan
      @PROFDUGAN

      Assistant Professor, University of Washington

    • Jerome Dugan is an Assistant Professor of Health Services and the Leo Greenawalt Endowed Professor of Health Policy in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington (UW) and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at UW. He is also the co-director of the Program in Health Economics and Outcomes Research Methodologies (PHEnOM), a joint program between the School of Public Health and the School of Pharmacy at UW. Dr. Dugan has expertise in modeling the financial and policy impacts of social and medical service interventions, evaluating the efficacy of cost containment strategies employed by payers and providers, and examining the structure and regulation of healthcare markets. In particular, his research focuses on the prevention and control of major chronic diseases – such as cardiovascular disease and mental health disorders – diagnoses that require a high level of coordination between individual patients, treating institutions, and insurers to minimize the probability of future acute events. Dr. Dugan holds an MA and PhD in Economics from Rice University and a BS in Economics from Clemson University. In addition to his academic appointments, he serves as a member of the Center for Health Innovation and Policy Science (CHIPS), the Health Economics Committee at the Washington Health Alliance, and the Health Care Cost Transparency Board’s Advisory Committee on Data Issues in Washington State.

    • Vivian Lee

      Vivian Lee
      @VIVIANLEEMD

      President of Health Platforms, Verily Life Sciences

    • Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is the author of The Long Fix: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis with Strategies that Work for Everyone (Norton). She is President of Health Platforms at Verily Life Sciences. A physician and health care executive, Lee also serves as a senior lecturer at Harvard Medical School. Prior to joining Verily, Lee served as the Dean of the Medical School and CEO of the University of Utah Health Care, an integrated health system with a budget of $3.6 billion, including a 1400 member physician group and health insurance plan. During her tenure, she led University of Utah Health to recognition for its health care delivery system innovations that enable higher quality at lower costs and with higher patient satisfaction, and superior financial performance. In 2016, University of Utah was ranked first among all university hospitals in quality and safety (Vizient). Dr. Lee previously was the inaugural Chief Scientific Officer of New York University’s Langone Medical Center. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine with over 200 peer-reviewed publications, Lee serves on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Fund, the Board of Trustees of Boston Children’s Hospital, and is also a director on the board of Zions Bancorporation, a publicly traded company. Dr. Lee is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard, received a D.Phil in medical engineering from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, earned her M.D. with honors from Harvard Medical School, and her MBA from NYU. She was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 50 Most Influential Clinical Executives in 2020.

    • Peter Shin

      Peter Shin
      @PETERSHINGW

      Associate Professor, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health

    • Peter Shin, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at the George Washington University and Gibson Program in Community Health Policy and RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Director. Dr. Shin focuses on the study of community health systems and integration of care for vulnerable populations and is author of over 100 health policy reports and articles on community health centers, the health care safety net, medically underserved populations, health care financing, social determinants and health information technology. His research focuses on identifying innovative payment and health care delivery models, exploring population health initiatives, and assessing impacts of policy change. Dr. Shin teaches courses in analytic methods and public health leadership and is an expert in the management and analysis of data, regulatory and policy analysis, community-based participatory research, and qualitative and quantitative evaluations and has provided technical assistance to federal and state agencies. Dr. Shin received his doctorate in public policy and MPH from the George Washington University and his BA in Biology from Oberlin College.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Politics and Health

How can local public health practitioners communicate effectively with their community members and promote evidence-based public health policies, in light of the existing political polarization and the rise of incorrect information disseminated through media, including social media?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 25th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNPH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills, Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of politics and policies in mobilizing and protecting the public. What can we learn from the political failures and successes of the Covid-19 era to create a healthier world? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence that “all policy is health policy”
  • Discuss considerations in developing improved health-promoting practices to improve health for all
  • Identify challenges and opportunities for political scientists and policy makers highlighted by the pandemic
  • Describe current social and political factors that influence the ability to implement effective, evidence-based policies


Subject Matter Experts

  • Kellie Carter Jackson

    Kellie Carter Jackson
    @KCARTERJACKSON

    Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities, Wellesley College
  • Kellie Carter Jackson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. Her book, Force & Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence, provides the first historical analysis exclusively focused on the use of violence among antebellum black activists. Force and Freedom won the James H. Broussard Best First Book Prize, was a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, a finalist for the Museum of African American History Stone Book Prize and listed among 13 books to read on African American History by the Washington Post. Her essays have been featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, Time, The Conversation, Boston’s NPR, among other outlets. She has also been interviewed for her expertise for MSNBC, SkyNews (UK) The New York Times, The Guardian, PBS, Vox, The Huff Post, C-SPAN, the BBC, Boston Public Radio, Al Jazeera International, and Slate. She has been featured in a host of documentaries and podcasts on history and race in the United States. Carter Jackson is also a commissioner for the Massachusetts Historical Commission, where she represents the Museum of African American History in Boston. Lastly, she is the co-host of the podcast, “This Day in Esoteric Political History.” You can follow her on Twitter @kcarterjackson.

  • Sandra Barnes

    Sandra Barnes
    @SANDRALBARNES1

    Professor, Vanderbilt University

  • Dr. Sandra L. Barnes has been a joint appointed Professor in the Dept. of Human and Organizational Development and the School of Divinity since 2008. She also served as the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion from 2016-2018. Her research and teaching areas include: Sociology of Religion, inequality, urban sociology, statistics, and African American studies. Dr. Barnes received a B.S. degree (1986) in mathematics and economics from Fisk University in Nashville, TN. She also earned Masters degrees from Georgia Institute of Technology (1989) and the Interdenominational Theological Center (1995) and the Ph.D. degree (1999) in Sociology from Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Phi Beta Kappa, her record includes: 9 books; 3 edited volumes; over 60 peer-reviewed articles; 10 book chapters; and, PI or Co-PI on grants totaling over $2.5 million dollars. Her articles have been published in SOCIAL FORCES, Social Problems, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, and Journal of African American Studies. She also created and developed the Emmy-nominated documentary, “Gary, Indiana: A Tale of Two Cities” (with Cinematicfocus). She recently completed another documentary on the public education system in the same city (“About the Kids: Volumes 1 and 2”). Barnes has presented her research in Beijing, China, Curitiba, Brazil, Dublin, Ireland, and at the Congressional Black Caucus of the Congress of the United States, Washington, D.C. Her recent book publication, Kings of Mississippi: Race, Religious Education, and the Making of a Middle-Class Black Family in the Segregated South (Cambridge University Press 2019), is a multi-disciplinary, mixed-methodological historiography about the trek into the middle class of a Black farming family in Mississippi.

  • David Bateman

    David Bateman
    @DAVIDALEXBATEMA

    Associate Professor, Cornell University

  • David A. Bateman is an associate professor in the Government Department at Cornell University, where he is one of the co-directors of the Politics of Race, Immigration, Class, and Ethnicity (PRICE) Initiative. His research focuses on the structures and ideologies of racism as well as on democratic institutions, including voting rights, Congress, state constitutions, and US labor law. His current projects include studies of post-Reconstruction Black politics, of the ideas and institutional organization of industrial democracy in the early 20th century US, and of the changing intellectual understandings of how democracy related to diversity from the 19th century to today. He is the author of Disenfranchising Democracy: Constructing the Electorate in the United States, United Kingdom, and France, and co-author (with Ira Katznelson and John Lapinski) of Southern Nation: Congress and White Supremacy After Reconstruction. He has published widely in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, Studies in American Political Development, Public Choice, The Forum, and Perspectives on Politics.

  • Kavita Patel

    Kavita Patel
    @KAVITAPMD

    Primary Care Physician and Nonresident Fellow, Brookings Institution

  • Kavita Patel is a Nonresident Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Previously, she was the managing director of clinical transformation at the Center for Health Policy at Brookings. Dr. Patel is an advisor to the Bipartisan Policy Center and a member of Health and Human Services Physician Focused Payment Model Technical Advisory Committee. Dr. Patel is a primary care physician in Washington, DC. She also served in the Obama Administration as director of policy for the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement in the White House. As a senior aide to Valerie Jarrett, President Obama’s senior advisor, Dr. Patel played a critical role in policy development and evaluation of policy initiatives connected to health reform, financial regulatory reform, and economic recovery issues. Dr. Patel also has a deep understanding of Capitol Hill from her time spent on the late Senator Edward Kennedy’s staff. As deputy staff director on health, she served as a policy analyst and trusted aide to the Senator and was part of the senior staff of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee under Sen. Kennedy’s leadership. She also has an extensive research and clinical background, having worked as a researcher at the RAND Corporation and as a practicing physician in both California and Oregon. She currently advises health care technology and services organizations through New Enterprise Associates. Dr. Patel a previous Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, and while at Brookings, returned to providing clinical care as an internal medicine practitioner. She earned her medical degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center and her masters in public health from the University of California Los Angeles.

  • Kay Lazar

    Kay Lazar
    @GLOBEKAYLAZAR

    MODERATOR Health Reporter, The Boston Globe

  • Kay Lazar is a health reporter who specializes in holding public institutions accountable..She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in national reporting in 2013 as part of a Globe team that covered a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak. She received a 2013 National Press Club award for excellence in writing on issues facing the elderly. Kay joined the Globe in 2004.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Food and Health

How can the major players in improving food system planning (i.e., food systems, public health, and local government) assure that they work together effectively?

 BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 14th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_NNFH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills, Community Partnership Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The pandemic worsened health inequities across the world, including gaps in access to food. How can we learn from the pandemic to create a healthier world with equal access to health essentials?

This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.

What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the specific goals and indicators included in the UN Summit’s 2015 Sustainable Development Goals that relate to food and hunger, and the current progress towards achieving them
  • Discuss the current prevalence of food insecurity across the globe and the effect of the pandemic
  • Define “sustainable diets” as promoted by EAT-Lancet Healthy Reference diet and discuss considerations for implementing such diets universally
  • Discuss how the pandemic directly affected supply chains, food system workers, and consumers
  • List 4 considerations that should be addressed in creating the “next normal” for food and health systems, especially in the context of urbanization and climate change


Subject Matter Experts

  • Yeeli Mui

    Yeeli Mui
    @DRYEELIMUI

    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Yeeli Mui, PhD, MPH, is a Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health in the Department of International Health. Her participatory action research focuses on strengthening policy to create equitable, sustainable, and healthy communities. Dr. Mui applies an urban planning lens to obesity prevention and healthy eating by critically examining relationships between food and other systems of the built environment, such as land use, transportation, and housing. Part of a multi-country effort, she is leading an interdisciplinary team to mitigate food inequities of small-scale farmers experiencing urbanization and climate change pressures in Kerala, India. Dr. Mui is also evaluating the role of collective efficacy and collaborative governance models to drive policy and food systems change at the local level in different U.S. cities.

  • Tolullah Oni

    Tolullah Oni
    @DRTOLULLAH

    Clinical Senior Research Associate, University of Cambridge

  • Tolullah Oni is a Public Health Physician Scientist and urban epidemiologist, and leads the Global Diet and Physical Activity group at the Unit. She completed her medical training at University College London, postgraduate medical training in the UK and Australia, a Masters in Public Health (Epidemiology) at the University of Cape Town, and her research doctorate in Clinical Epidemiology at Imperial College London. She spent 11 years conducting research in South Africa, where she also completed her public health medical specialty training. She established and leads (as an Honorary Associate Professor) a Research Initiative for Cities Health and Equity (RICHE) at the University of Cape Town, conducting transdisciplinary urban health research focused on generating evidence to support development and implementation of healthy public policies in rapidly growing cities, with a focus on Africa. Research activities include Systems for Health projects: investigating how urban systems (e.g. housing, food) can be harnessed for health; and Health Systems projects: integrated heath systems responses to changing patterns of disease and multimorbidity in the context of urbanisation. She continues this planetary health focus within the unit, focusing on meso- and macro-level determinants of diet and physical activity in the contexts of urbanisation and climate change worldwide. She has published over 80 manuscripts in high-impact journals, and has given presentations at international academic (urban health, HIV, TB) and non-academic meetings including the United Nations High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development, New York; and the World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual Meeting, Davos 2018. Tolullah serves on several advisory boards including Future Earth and is an editorial board member of Lancet Planetary Health, Cities and Health, the Journal of Urban Health and PLOS Global Public Health. Profiled in the Lancet journal in 2016, she is a Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge a Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader.

  • Usha Ramakrishnan

    Usha Ramakrishnan
    @EMORYROLLINS

    Professor, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health

  • Usha Ramakrishnan, PhD, is the Chair & Distinguished Richard N. Hubert Professor of the Hubert Department of Global Health in The Rollins School of Public Health, and Graduate Faculty member of the Doctoral Programs in a) Nutrition and Health Sciences (NHS) and b) Global Health and Development, Laney Graduate School, at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. She is a leading expert in global maternal and child nutrition and health and has authored over 170 research articles in peer-reviewed professional journals, 19 book chapters, and, edited 4 Books, Monographs and Proceedings. Dr. Ramakrishnan has designed and led large randomized controlled trials (RCT) that test nutrient interventions during pregnancy and early childhood, and also participated in prospective longitudinal studies that examine pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight, preterm birth and subsequent child growth and development. She has examined the effects of multiple micronutrient (MM) malnutrition during pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood, and more recently completed a large RCT of the effects of weekly pre-conception multiple micronutrient (MM) supplements on maternal and child health outcome in Vietnam (PRECONCEPT). Her current research projects also include examining the effects of omega-3 fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), during pregnancy on child health, growth and development. She was the PI of a large NIH-funded research project in collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico, that examined the effects of prenatal DHA supplements on infant development (POSGRAD), and has followed up this cohort through 11 y of age. She has also led and participated in several collaborations with non-governmental organizations and research institutions based in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Europe, and also serves on several expert review panels and has provided technical support for various projects in her field of expertise over the years.

  • May Wang

    May Wang
    @UCLAFSPH

    Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health
  • Dr. May Wang joined the faculty as associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences in 2008. She received an undergraduate degree from the National University of Singapore, a master’s degree in nutritional science from the University of Texas at Austin, and master’s and doctorate degrees in public health from the University of California at Berkeley. After obtaining her doctorate degree, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine where she was trained in the emerging field of pediatric bone health research. Since then, she has conducted research related to child obesity and bone health with a focus on addressing health disparities. She is the recipient of several awards, including the Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association and Excellence in Education Award from the California Dietetic Association. Areas of Interest: Social and physical environmental determinants of diet-related conditions with a focus on childhood obesity; immigrant food-related behaviors, and evaluations of nutrition programs for children

  • Julia Belluz

    Julia Belluz
    @JULIAOFTORONTO

    MODERATOR
    Senior Health Correspondent, VOX
  • Julia Belluz is Vox’s senior health correspondent, focused on medicine, science, and public health. She’s covered topics as varied as the anti-vaccine movement, America’s staggering maternal mortality problem, how dark chocolate became a health food, and what makes America’s sickest county so unhealthy. She has also debunked numerous medical misinformation peddlers such as Dr. Oz, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Alex Jones. In 2015, Julia launched Vox’s Show Me the Evidence series, which goes beyond the frenzy of daily headlines to take a deeper look at the state of the science behind pressing health questions, from treatments for chronic back pain to why exercise is not helpful when it comes to weight loss. Before joining Vox, Julia was a Knight Science Journalism fellow at MIT and her writing appeared in a range of international publications, including the BMJ, the Chicago Tribune, the Economist and Economist’s Intelligent Life magazine, the Globe and Mail, the LA Times, Maclean’s, the National Post, Slate, and the Times of London. She holds an MSc from the London School of Economics. She is the recipient of numerous journalism awards, including the 2016 Balles Prize in Critical Thinking, the 2017 American Society of Nutrition Journalism Award, and several Canadian National Magazine Awards. Outside of reporting, she speaks regularly at universities and conferences the world over, and has been a fellow at McMaster University. Follow her on Twitter @juliaoftoronto.



      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in suicide causes, evidence and prevention
  • Format: Recorded Seminar/Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_12102020.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 1: Understanding Suicide

    Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 2: Stopping Suicide
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Seminar Recording

This is the third part in a three-part symposium on suicide at BUSPH. BUSPH symposia are conversations about things that affect the health of populations. The first two parts looked at the research on causes and evidence around suicide prevention. Given the research, the relatively little progress public health has made on suicide, and worries during this time of economic and social stressors, this part of the symposia explores what public health can do to prevent suicide.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 protective factors that are associated with reduced risk of suicide in youth
  • Discuss importance of partnerships with faith communities in the prevention of suicide
  • Describe effects of stigma and their possible interventions across levels of analysis (individual, interpersonal, structural) on suicide risk among LGBTQ youth
  • List 5 community-based (“non-medical) intervention strategies that have been shown to be effective in preventing suicide
  • Discuss possible reasons and potential interventions for elevated risk of suicide post-discharge from hospitalization for suicidality
  • Discuss the association of suicide risk and the COVID pandemic and possible interventions to address it

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


    Subject Matter Experts


  • Sherry Molock

    Associate Professor, George Washington University


  • Mark Hatzenbuehler

    Associate Professor, Harvard
    University

  • Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, PhD, is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Psychology at Harvard. He was previously an Associate Professor (with tenure) and Deputy Chair for Faculty Development and Research Strategy in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia. Dr. Hatzenbuehler received his PhD in clinical psychology from Yale and completed his post-doctoral training in population health at Columbia, where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. Dr. Hatzenbuehler’s work examines the role of stigma in shaping population health inequalities, with a particular focus on the mental health consequences of structural forms of stigma. His research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and through the William T. Grant Foundation Scholars Program. He has received several early career and distinguished contribution awards from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2019, he was one of only 204 social scientists named to the prestigious Highly Cited Researcher List by Clarivate Analytics in recognition of his research influence, as demonstrated by the production of multiple highly-cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in Web of Science. Dr. Hatzenbuehler is an elected fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, the premier honorary organization for scientists working at the interface of behavior and medicine, and he has been appointed to serve on two consensus committees at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


  • Lisa Wexler

    Professor,
    University of
    Michigan

  • Lisa Wexler, Ph.D., MSW is a Professor in the School of Social Work and at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, and her research focuses on suicide prevention, wellness/resilience and praxis. Her community-engaged research engages participants in all levels of the process, responds to cultural and community priorities, and builds on and promotes personal and collective assets. Currently, she is working with community partners test the efficacy of a community mobilization approach to suicide prevention for rural Indigenous communities. The intervention, Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES), showed great promise in a pilot in Northwest Alaska (R34 MH096884) with results that showed learning and behavior change in attendees as well as close associates of participants. The ripple effect is important, and will be further tested in a larger trial in Bering Strait (R01 MH112458)( see: http://www.pc-cares.org/). Dr. Wexler with Drs. Rasmus and Allen (U19 MH113138) are working to identify vital community targets associated with reduced youth suicide risk within 3 rural and remote regions of Alaska. The study is a central component of a center called, Alaska Native Collaborative Hub for Research on Resilience (ANCHRR) (see: https://www.anchrr.org/). Her school-based research utilizes Intergenerational Dialogue Exchange and Action (IDEA)—a participatory research method—to engage young people in efforts to find local strengths, skills and wisdom through cross-generational and community-based investigations that—through the effort–enhance youth possibilities for action and strengthen their social connections within and outside of their home communities. Lastly, she has been working with tribal partners to develop a firearm lethal means restriction intervention called the Family Safety Net, which is a universal, clinic-based brief intervention to increase home safety. These various projects integrate Indigenous knowledge and participation in research to address local needs while maximizing the study’s public health impact.


  • Natalie Riblet

    Assistant Professor, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • Natalie Riblet is a staff psychiatrist at the White River Junction VA Medical Center, where she has both clinical and research roles. She graduated with an MD from Dartmouth Medical School in 2008 and an MPH from Dartmouth in 2012. She completed her residencies at Dartmouth, including general preventive medicine and public health in 2012 as well as general psychiatry in 2014. After completing a VA fellowship in Patient Safety in 2016, she completed a VA New England Early Research Career Development Award in 2019. As part of this VISN1 CDA, she developed a VA adaptation of the successful World Health Organization Brief Intervention and Contact Program. She is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.
    In Natalie’s current research roles, she is focused on identifying and testing interventions to prevent death by suicide. This work is supported through funding from the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center White River Junction and the National Center for Patient Safety Center of Inquiry Program. Natalie was also recently awarded a VA Clinical Science Research & Development (CSR&D) Career Development Award. As part of the award period, Natalie will study a suicide prevention intervention that builds off of her prior work with the goal of improving social connectedness and engagement in treatment after psychiatric hospitalization.


  • Julia Raifman

    Assistant Professor, Boston
    University

  • Julia Raifman, ScD, SM conducts research on how health and social policies drive population health and health disparities. Much of her current work is focused on evaluating how state and federal policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis are shaping the spread of COVID-19 and mental distress during the pandemic. She created the COVID-19 U.S. State Policy Database (CUSP) to facilitate widespread, rapid response research on how state policies are affecting health and well-being: https://tinyurl.com/statepolicies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, her research includes analyses on associations between LGBT rights and mental distress and on associations between state firearm policies and adolescent suicide. She also conducts research on how structural stigma and structural racism shape disparities in the burden of infectious diseases such as HIV and COVID-19. Dr. Raifman's research has been covered in the New York Times, The Guardian, National Public Radio, and The Advocate. Dr. Raifman teaches Quantitative Methods for Health Services and Policy Research. She enjoys mentoring and is committed to promoting the success of diverse students. Dr. Raifman received her doctoral and masters degree from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins prior to joining Boston University.

    MODERATED DISCUSSION

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus's research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this seminar recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

An Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases and their Drivers

Why are zoonoses and vectorborne diseases increasing?

 
 NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo    NCHEC CHES Logo   


Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, veterinarians, human health clinicians, environmental scientists, students, and others interested in zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Format: Recorded screencasts, available on demand
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 4 screencasts, 30 minutes each (2 hours total)
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:

    Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_12152020 . 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion trainings: An Introduction to One Health
  • Pre-requisites: None



About this course

In the first of four screencasts the public health practitioner is introduced to zoonoses and vectorborne diseases and how they differ from other infectious diseases. In subsequent screencasts, the factors (drivers) that influence zoonoses and vectorborne disease are explained, including human systems, human-animal-environment interaction, and environmental change. Multiple disease-specific examples are provided, including COVID-19.

Zoonotic diseases are those that can be passed between humans and other vertebrate animals and vectorborne disease are those that are transmitted by an arthropod vector like a flea or tick. Because non-human animals serve as a disease reservoir or vector, disease prevention and control strategies differ from other infectious diseases. More than half, an estimated 60%, of all the kinds of infections that people can get are zoonotic and 75% of emerging infectious diseases, including COVID-19, are zoonotic. There are many human-driven factors that influence zoonotic disease emergence and re-emergence. These drivers include infrastructure, travel and trade, culture, agricultural intensification, interaction with domestic and wild animals, climate change, land use, and biodiversity. In this series of four screencasts, you will be introduced to zoonotic and vectorborne diseases and their drivers.

What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to...

Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases

  • Define zoonoses, vectorborne diseases, emerging zoonotic diseases, reverse zoonoses, reservoir host, amplification, dead-end host, and spillover
  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Describe how the following disease prevention and control tools differ for zoonotic and vectorborne diseases: education, surveillance, vector control, diagnostics, outbreak investigation, host identification, and vaccination
  • Define One Health and explain why this approach is useful for addressing zoonotic and vector-borne diseases

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human Systems

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases related to human systems and culture
  • Provide examples of how infrastructure influences zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that have emerged as a result of human travel and trade
  • Provide examples of how culture impacts zoonotic and vectorborne disease

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human-animal-environment Interactions

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne disease related to human-animal interactions
  • Provide examples of diseases that can be spread from pets and livestock to people
  • Explain how agricultural systems influence zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that can result from human or domestic animal interaction with wildlife

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Environmental Change

  • List three key environmental drivers that impact zoonotic and vectorborne disease
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne disease influenced by weather and climate
  • Explain how land use and ecosystem disruption can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Explain how biodiversity can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases

Subject Matter Expert


  • Lynn Zanradi Blevins

  • Lynn Zanradi Blevins has been practicing public health in government and academic settings for 20 years in the areas of infectious disease, environmental health, emergency preparedness, and One Health (human-animal-environmental health).



    Enrollment and Contact Hours

    Select the Enroll button below to register for the course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement:

    This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Self-Paced

LPHI Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate

Do you work in Emergency Preparedness or want to learn more about it? This certificate will give you a broad knowledge base and you will receive a training certificate upon successful completion.

Note: The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate was discontinued from July 1st 2020 due to reduced funding, still 14 Self- paced trainings are available for enrollment.

New England Public Health Training Center
Enroll

Course Information

  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 14 Self-paced trainings and exam
  • Competencies: Emergency Preparedness
  • Learning Level: Awareness through performance
  • Supplemental materials: None

About this course

The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate is produced by the Local Public Health Institute of Massachusetts, in conjunction with the Office of Preparedness and Emergency Management (OPEM) of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate has been developed for staff and volunteers from municipal or state agencies across Massachusetts who are responsible for public health emergency preparedness and response activities.

Candidates may include, but not limited to:

  • Board of Health or other governing body members
  • Municipal Compliance Officers or Sanitarians
  • Emergency Preparedness Coordinators
  • Environmental Health Inspectors, Sanitarians, or Specialists
  • Health Agents
  • Health Directors or Commissioners
  • Health Inspectors
  • Public Health Nurses

The Certificate is a bundle of 14 individual trainings that cover a wide breadth of Emergency Preparedness topics. All required trainings are available on-line, 24/7, and can be taken at the candidate’s own pace. If a candidate has completed one of the required trainings within 5 years, they need not take the training again – submission of their previous certificate will be accepted. The majority of the courses are hosted by the LPHI, but some are hosted by other organizations including the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Candidates for this Certificate should move through the list of required trainings at their own pace and in the order of their own choosing. Continuing education credits are awarded for completion of most individual trainings, and vary by topic (generally from one to six contact hours). After completion of each individual training, you will need to upload the certificate of completion for that particular block of the certificate to the appropriate section (details on how to do this are provided in the technical help section below.) Once all individual criteria have been completed and verified, you will be given access to the culminating exam.

This culminating exam, developed by Subject Matter Experts, will test the knowledge and skills gained through the individual trainings. The exam is scenario-based, multiple choice, and open book. Upon successful completion of the exam, candidates are awarded the LPHI Emergency Preparedness Certificate.

Enrollment

To enroll in this training, select the Continue box below.

Enrollment Options Key
For a Certificate of Completion
Enroll-001
To Audit (No Certificate)
Audit-001

Having trouble accessing the course? Contact support@nephtc.org

Category: Self-Paced

Course Information


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

Community Health Workers are central in supporting the health of the communities they work with, and yet, they are often at risk for burnout themselves due to inequitable work conditions. This workshop will discuss strategies for voice and reflect on how to improve well-being at work.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the connection between workers’ voices and their well-being as individuals, and as a collective group.
  • Discuss benefits of worker unions and strategies for organizing workers in health and social services.
  • Discuss strategies for voicing and improving well-being at work
  • Recognize how systemic oppressions and practices impact our work and well being


Subject Matter Expert

  • Yaminette Diaz

    Yaminette Diaz

  • Yaminette Díaz-Linhart is a PhD candidate at Brandeis University. Her research explores how worker voice and representation impact well-being outcomes for health care and social service workers. She is currently conducting a study to understand the well-being of community health workers in Massachusetts.

  • Yaminette Diaz

    Kimberly Mendoza

  • Kimberly Mendoza Iraheta is a CHW and Regional Chapter Leader in Greater-Boston for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.


  • Lisette Blondet

  • Lissette Blondet is the director of the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers (MACHW). She has dedicated most of her professional life to anchoring community health workers (CHWs) as public health professionals. In 1993, she founded the Community Health Education Center (CHEC), one of the first training and resource centers for CHWs in the country. CHEC’s standards for CHW curricula and core competencies have been replicated in other states. The program was so successful that in 1997, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health funded its expansion to the northeast region of the state. Both centers, CHEC Boston and CHEC Northeast are still thriving and have graduated over a thousand CHWs. More recently, Lissette provided technical assistance to the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund on community health and community health workers. She also previously served as Director of Community Benefits for Cape Cod Healthcare, focusing on making healthcare accessible to the underserved while building her experience in healthcare financing. As the director of MACHW, Lissette brings all her experience and skills to strengthen the association and strategically position the workforce to seize the many opportunities now available through health care reform, including reimbursement and broad recognition of the attributes and competencies of CHWs.


  • Jamie Berberena

  • Jamie Berberena is the Southeast Regional Leader and Advisory Board member with the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers. She is a passionate public health advocate focused on promoting racial equity throughout Massachusetts. With over a decade of experience promoting the health and well-being of diverse communities across Massachusetts by providing direct support and guidance through community-based programs, multi-disciplinary clinical programs and health policy initiatives.


  • Areliz Barbosa

  • Areliz Barbosa is a CHW and is the Regional Chapter Leader for Western Massachusetts for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement

This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program”. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.



To Learn more about the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers please visit: www.machw.org

Category: Workshop

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health center personnel who have a direct role in emergency preparedness planning and response, as well as key decision-making staff such as executive directors, operations managers, office managers and facility staff.
  • Format: Blended
  • Price: Free
  • Start Date: January 17, 2017
  • End Date: February 14, 2017
  • Length: Two 90 minute webinars with a one-month team project period in between webinars
  • Competencies: Public Health Preparedness and Response Core Competencies, Domain 3: Plan for and Improve Practice
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Supplemental materials: Course Summary (PDF)
  • Pre-requisites:

About this course

The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge and hands-on planning experience incorporating the Incident Command System (ICS) into your Center’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and customizing ICS tools for your Center’s use. The training will consist of two 90 minute webinars with a team project in between. Webinar #1 will provide an understanding of key incident management concepts for FQHCs, based on the Healthcare Incident Command System (HICS) model, including how it is incorporated into the EOP. Following the webinar, participants will update their Center’s EOP as a team and customize standard HICS tools for their center. Technical assistance will be available to Center teams as requested during the 4-week period between the two webinars. On webinar #2, participants will share their accomplishments and challenges updating their plans and tools followed by a presentation on how to draft and execute a workplace exercise to test their organization’s utilization of HICS.

This training is a collaboration between NEPHTC, the DelValle Institute for Emergency Preparedness and the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers.

What you'll learn

This course provides practical knowledge on how to apply basic HICS principals and concepts in the Community Health Center environment. Successful participants will improve their ability to apply HICS by updating ICS aspects of their EOP and customizing ICS tools for their centers. The training is appropriate for individuals with all levels of experience with emergency operations planning.

After completing this course, you will be able to...

  • Discuss the importance and purpose of utilizing HICS to manage the response to an incident.
  • Discuss how HICS is incorporated into the organizational Emergency Operations Plan (EOP).
  • Describe the primary functions and management principles of HICS.
  • Recognize the key HICS tools and forms used in incident management.
  • Update the organizational EOP to enhance the use of HICS when the plan is activated
  • Select HICS tools and forms to be used within the organization and adapt them as necessary.
  • Provide examples of common challenges updating an organizational EOP and associated HICS tools.
  • Identify initial steps to draft an exercise to test the use of HICS in a simulated EOP activation.
  • Locate resources to support the design and execution of an exercise.
  • Summarize course key concepts

Instructors

Enrollment and Completion

To enroll in this course, please select the Enroll Me button below. Note that centers are strongly encouraged to register as teams of 2 to 5 staff from each Center.

This course is designed for Community Health Center staff. Participants must attend both webinars and participate in the team project in order to receive a NEPHTC Certificate of Completion. Any questions about the program or enrollment can be directed to Kathi Traugh at kathi.traugh@yale.edu or by calling 203-785-2868.

Category: Workshop