Back to Search

Courses with keyword "Preparedness"

The Next Normal: Politics and Health

How can local public health practitioners communicate effectively with their community members and promote evidence-based public health policies, in light of the existing political polarization and the rise of incorrect information disseminated through media, including social media?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, October 25th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNPH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of politics and policies in mobilizing and protecting the public. What can we learn from the political failures and successes of the Covid-19 era to create a healthier world? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence that “all policy is health policy”
  • Discuss considerations in developing improved health-promoting practices to improve health for all
  • Identify challenges and opportunities for political scientists and policy makers highlighted by the pandemic
  • Describe current social and political factors that influence the ability to implement effective, evidence-based policies

Subject Matter Experts

  • Kellie Carter Jackson

    Kellie Carter Jackson
    @KCARTERJACKSON

    Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities, Wellesley College
  • Kellie Carter Jackson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. Her book, Force & Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence, provides the first historical analysis exclusively focused on the use of violence among antebellum black activists. Force and Freedom won the James H. Broussard Best First Book Prize, was a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, a finalist for the Museum of African American History Stone Book Prize and listed among 13 books to read on African American History by the Washington Post. Her essays have been featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, Time, The Conversation, Boston’s NPR, among other outlets. She has also been interviewed for her expertise for MSNBC, SkyNews (UK) The New York Times, The Guardian, PBS, Vox, The Huff Post, C-SPAN, the BBC, Boston Public Radio, Al Jazeera International, and Slate. She has been featured in a host of documentaries and podcasts on history and race in the United States. Carter Jackson is also a commissioner for the Massachusetts Historical Commission, where she represents the Museum of African American History in Boston. Lastly, she is the co-host of the podcast, “This Day in Esoteric Political History.” You can follow her on Twitter @kcarterjackson.

  • Sandra Barnes

    Sandra Barnes
    @SANDRALBARNES1

    Professor, Vanderbilt University

  • Dr. Sandra L. Barnes has been a joint appointed Professor in the Dept. of Human and Organizational Development and the School of Divinity since 2008. She also served as the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion from 2016-2018. Her research and teaching areas include: Sociology of Religion, inequality, urban sociology, statistics, and African American studies. Dr. Barnes received a B.S. degree (1986) in mathematics and economics from Fisk University in Nashville, TN. She also earned Masters degrees from Georgia Institute of Technology (1989) and the Interdenominational Theological Center (1995) and the Ph.D. degree (1999) in Sociology from Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Phi Beta Kappa, her record includes: 9 books; 3 edited volumes; over 60 peer-reviewed articles; 10 book chapters; and, PI or Co-PI on grants totaling over $2.5 million dollars. Her articles have been published in SOCIAL FORCES, Social Problems, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, and Journal of African American Studies. She also created and developed the Emmy-nominated documentary, “Gary, Indiana: A Tale of Two Cities” (with Cinematicfocus). She recently completed another documentary on the public education system in the same city (“About the Kids: Volumes 1 and 2”). Barnes has presented her research in Beijing, China, Curitiba, Brazil, Dublin, Ireland, and at the Congressional Black Caucus of the Congress of the United States, Washington, D.C. Her recent book publication, Kings of Mississippi: Race, Religious Education, and the Making of a Middle-Class Black Family in the Segregated South (Cambridge University Press 2019), is a multi-disciplinary, mixed-methodological historiography about the trek into the middle class of a Black farming family in Mississippi.

  • David Bateman

    David Bateman
    @DAVIDALEXBATEMA

    Associate Professor, Cornell University

  • David A. Bateman is an associate professor in the Government Department at Cornell University, where he is one of the co-directors of the Politics of Race, Immigration, Class, and Ethnicity (PRICE) Initiative. His research focuses on the structures and ideologies of racism as well as on democratic institutions, including voting rights, Congress, state constitutions, and US labor law. His current projects include studies of post-Reconstruction Black politics, of the ideas and institutional organization of industrial democracy in the early 20th century US, and of the changing intellectual understandings of how democracy related to diversity from the 19th century to today. He is the author of Disenfranchising Democracy: Constructing the Electorate in the United States, United Kingdom, and France, and co-author (with Ira Katznelson and John Lapinski) of Southern Nation: Congress and White Supremacy After Reconstruction. He has published widely in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, Studies in American Political Development, Public Choice, The Forum, and Perspectives on Politics.

  • Kavita Patel

    Kavita Patel
    @KAVITAPMD

    Primary Care Physician and Nonresident Fellow, Brookings Institution

  • Kavita Patel is a Nonresident Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Previously, she was the managing director of clinical transformation at the Center for Health Policy at Brookings. Dr. Patel is an advisor to the Bipartisan Policy Center and a member of Health and Human Services Physician Focused Payment Model Technical Advisory Committee. Dr. Patel is a primary care physician in Washington, DC. She also served in the Obama Administration as director of policy for the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement in the White House. As a senior aide to Valerie Jarrett, President Obama’s senior advisor, Dr. Patel played a critical role in policy development and evaluation of policy initiatives connected to health reform, financial regulatory reform, and economic recovery issues. Dr. Patel also has a deep understanding of Capitol Hill from her time spent on the late Senator Edward Kennedy’s staff. As deputy staff director on health, she served as a policy analyst and trusted aide to the Senator and was part of the senior staff of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee under Sen. Kennedy’s leadership. She also has an extensive research and clinical background, having worked as a researcher at the RAND Corporation and as a practicing physician in both California and Oregon. She currently advises health care technology and services organizations through New Enterprise Associates. Dr. Patel a previous Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, and while at Brookings, returned to providing clinical care as an internal medicine practitioner. She earned her medical degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center and her masters in public health from the University of California Los Angeles.

  • Kay Lazar

    Kay Lazar
    @GLOBEKAYLAZAR

    MODERATOR Health Reporter, The Boston Globe

  • Kay Lazar is a health reporter who specializes in holding public institutions accountable..She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in national reporting in 2013 as part of a Globe team that covered a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak. She received a 2013 National Press Club award for excellence in writing on issues facing the elderly. Kay joined the Globe in 2004.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Hospitals and Healthcare

How can individuals be empowered and motivated to participate in optimizing their own health? What can be the role of public health practitioners?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, December 2nd 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_NNEH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Domestically and globally, healthcare systems were overwhelmed by the COVID-19 pandemic. What have we learned from the pandemic about how care is delivered and how our systems can be improved to better deliver efficient and high-quality care? This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe factors that influence the variability in charges for services across hospitals
  • Describe major short-term and long-term consequences of COVID on hospitals and patients
  • Explain concept of “coproducing” health (empowering people to engage with their own health) - and lessons learned from COVID experience that may promote it
  • Discuss the role of community health centers, the impact of COVID on them, and challenges to adapting going forward

Subject Matter Experts

  • Ge Bai

    Ge Bai
    @GEBAIDC

    Associate Professor of Practice, John Hopkins Carey Business School
  • Ge Bai, PhD, CPA is an Associate Professor of Accounting at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and an Associate Professor of Health Policy & Management (joint) at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has received the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association’s Excellence in Teaching Award. An expert on health care pricing, policy, and management, Dr. Bai has testified before House Ways and Means Committee, written for the Wall Street Journal, and published her studies in leading academic journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Health Affairs. Her work has been widely featured in ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox News, Los Angeles Times, NBC, New York Times, NPR, PBS, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media outlets and used in government regulations and congressional testimonies.

  • Jerome Dugan

    Jerome Dugan
    @PROFDUGAN

    Assistant Professor, University of Washington

  • Jerome Dugan is an Assistant Professor of Health Services and the Leo Greenawalt Endowed Professor of Health Policy in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington (UW) and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at UW. He is also the co-director of the Program in Health Economics and Outcomes Research Methodologies (PHEnOM), a joint program between the School of Public Health and the School of Pharmacy at UW. Dr. Dugan has expertise in modeling the financial and policy impacts of social and medical service interventions, evaluating the efficacy of cost containment strategies employed by payers and providers, and examining the structure and regulation of healthcare markets. In particular, his research focuses on the prevention and control of major chronic diseases – such as cardiovascular disease and mental health disorders – diagnoses that require a high level of coordination between individual patients, treating institutions, and insurers to minimize the probability of future acute events. Dr. Dugan holds an MA and PhD in Economics from Rice University and a BS in Economics from Clemson University. In addition to his academic appointments, he serves as a member of the Center for Health Innovation and Policy Science (CHIPS), the Health Economics Committee at the Washington Health Alliance, and the Health Care Cost Transparency Board’s Advisory Committee on Data Issues in Washington State.

  • Vivian Lee

    Vivian Lee
    @VIVIANLEEMD

    President of Health Platforms, Verily Life Sciences

  • Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is the author of The Long Fix: Solving America’s Health Care Crisis with Strategies that Work for Everyone (Norton). She is President of Health Platforms at Verily Life Sciences. A physician and health care executive, Lee also serves as a senior lecturer at Harvard Medical School. Prior to joining Verily, Lee served as the Dean of the Medical School and CEO of the University of Utah Health Care, an integrated health system with a budget of $3.6 billion, including a 1400 member physician group and health insurance plan. During her tenure, she led University of Utah Health to recognition for its health care delivery system innovations that enable higher quality at lower costs and with higher patient satisfaction, and superior financial performance. In 2016, University of Utah was ranked first among all university hospitals in quality and safety (Vizient). Dr. Lee previously was the inaugural Chief Scientific Officer of New York University’s Langone Medical Center. Elected to the National Academy of Medicine with over 200 peer-reviewed publications, Lee serves on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Fund, the Board of Trustees of Boston Children’s Hospital, and is also a director on the board of Zions Bancorporation, a publicly traded company. Dr. Lee is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard, received a D.Phil in medical engineering from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, earned her M.D. with honors from Harvard Medical School, and her MBA from NYU. She was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 50 Most Influential Clinical Executives in 2020.

  • Peter Shin

    Peter Shin
    @PETERSHINGW

    Associate Professor, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health

  • Peter Shin, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at the George Washington University and Gibson Program in Community Health Policy and RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Director. Dr. Shin focuses on the study of community health systems and integration of care for vulnerable populations and is author of over 100 health policy reports and articles on community health centers, the health care safety net, medically underserved populations, health care financing, social determinants and health information technology. His research focuses on identifying innovative payment and health care delivery models, exploring population health initiatives, and assessing impacts of policy change. Dr. Shin teaches courses in analytic methods and public health leadership and is an expert in the management and analysis of data, regulatory and policy analysis, community-based participatory research, and qualitative and quantitative evaluations and has provided technical assistance to federal and state agencies. Dr. Shin received his doctorate in public policy and MPH from the George Washington University and his BA in Biology from Oberlin College.

  • Reed Abelson

    Reed Abelson
    @REEDABELSON

    MODERATOR, Reporter, The New York Times

  • Reed Abelson has been a reporter for The New York Times since 1995. She currently covers the business of health care, focusing on health insurance and how financial incentives affect the delivery of medical care. She witnessed the Affordable Care Act become law and is actively keeping an eye on what happens next. Before she began covering health care in 2002, Ms. Abelson covered a broad range of topics, from the collapse of Enron to the oversight of charitable organizations to accounting to personal investing. Before joining The Times, Ms. Abelson was a staff writer for Smart Money from 1993 to 1995, where she wrote in-depth investing features. From 1990 to 1993, she was a reporter for Forbes, where she profiled public and private companies. She began her journalism career as a reporter at the Philadelphia Business Journal, where she covered health care, venture capital, technology and the ports of Philadelphia. She graduated cum laude from Bryn Mawr College in 1983 with an A.B. in English literature, and she earned an M.A. in English literature from Columbia University in 1984.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Next Normal: Food and Health

How can the major players in improving food system planning (i.e., food systems, public health, and local government) assure that they work together effectively?

    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, October 14th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.25 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_NNFH
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

The pandemic worsened health inequities across the world, including gaps in access to food. How can we learn from the pandemic to create a healthier world with equal access to health essentials?

This program is a part of “The Next Normal” series, designed to take a moment to pause and ask, as we emerge from the pandemic, what we have learned and why, in order to promote the health of all, we cannot return to pre-pandemic normal.

What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the specific goals and indicators included in the UN Summit’s 2015 Sustainable Development Goals that relate to food and hunger, and the current progress towards achieving them
  • Discuss the current prevalence of food insecurity across the globe and the effect of the pandemic
  • Define “sustainable diets” as promoted by EAT-Lancet Healthy Reference diet and discuss considerations for implementing such diets universally
  • Discuss how the pandemic directly affected supply chains, food system workers, and consumers
  • List 4 considerations that should be addressed in creating the “next normal” for food and health systems, especially in the context of urbanization and climate change

Subject Matter Experts

  • Yeeli Mui

    Yeeli Mui
    @DRYEELIMUI

    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Yeeli Mui, PhD, MPH, is a Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health in the Department of International Health. Her participatory action research focuses on strengthening policy to create equitable, sustainable, and healthy communities. Dr. Mui applies an urban planning lens to obesity prevention and healthy eating by critically examining relationships between food and other systems of the built environment, such as land use, transportation, and housing. Part of a multi-country effort, she is leading an interdisciplinary team to mitigate food inequities of small-scale farmers experiencing urbanization and climate change pressures in Kerala, India. Dr. Mui is also evaluating the role of collective efficacy and collaborative governance models to drive policy and food systems change at the local level in different U.S. cities.

  • Tolullah Oni

    Tolullah Oni
    @DRTOLULLAH

    Clinical Senior Research Associate, University of Cambridge

  • Tolullah Oni is a Public Health Physician Scientist and urban epidemiologist, and leads the Global Diet and Physical Activity group at the Unit. She completed her medical training at University College London, postgraduate medical training in the UK and Australia, a Masters in Public Health (Epidemiology) at the University of Cape Town, and her research doctorate in Clinical Epidemiology at Imperial College London. She spent 11 years conducting research in South Africa, where she also completed her public health medical specialty training. She established and leads (as an Honorary Associate Professor) a Research Initiative for Cities Health and Equity (RICHE) at the University of Cape Town, conducting transdisciplinary urban health research focused on generating evidence to support development and implementation of healthy public policies in rapidly growing cities, with a focus on Africa. Research activities include Systems for Health projects: investigating how urban systems (e.g. housing, food) can be harnessed for health; and Health Systems projects: integrated heath systems responses to changing patterns of disease and multimorbidity in the context of urbanisation. She continues this planetary health focus within the unit, focusing on meso- and macro-level determinants of diet and physical activity in the contexts of urbanisation and climate change worldwide. She has published over 80 manuscripts in high-impact journals, and has given presentations at international academic (urban health, HIV, TB) and non-academic meetings including the United Nations High Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development, New York; and the World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual Meeting, Davos 2018. Tolullah serves on several advisory boards including Future Earth and is an editorial board member of Lancet Planetary Health, Cities and Health, the Journal of Urban Health and PLOS Global Public Health. Profiled in the Lancet journal in 2016, she is a Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge a Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader.

  • Usha Ramakrishnan

    Usha Ramakrishnan
    @EMORYROLLINS

    Professor, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health

  • Usha Ramakrishnan, PhD, is the Chair & Distinguished Richard N. Hubert Professor of the Hubert Department of Global Health in The Rollins School of Public Health, and Graduate Faculty member of the Doctoral Programs in a) Nutrition and Health Sciences (NHS) and b) Global Health and Development, Laney Graduate School, at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. She is a leading expert in global maternal and child nutrition and health and has authored over 170 research articles in peer-reviewed professional journals, 19 book chapters, and, edited 4 Books, Monographs and Proceedings. Dr. Ramakrishnan has designed and led large randomized controlled trials (RCT) that test nutrient interventions during pregnancy and early childhood, and also participated in prospective longitudinal studies that examine pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight, preterm birth and subsequent child growth and development. She has examined the effects of multiple micronutrient (MM) malnutrition during pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood, and more recently completed a large RCT of the effects of weekly pre-conception multiple micronutrient (MM) supplements on maternal and child health outcome in Vietnam (PRECONCEPT). Her current research projects also include examining the effects of omega-3 fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), during pregnancy on child health, growth and development. She was the PI of a large NIH-funded research project in collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico, that examined the effects of prenatal DHA supplements on infant development (POSGRAD), and has followed up this cohort through 11 y of age. She has also led and participated in several collaborations with non-governmental organizations and research institutions based in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Europe, and also serves on several expert review panels and has provided technical support for various projects in her field of expertise over the years.

  • May Wang

    May Wang
    @UCLAFSPH

    Professor, University of California Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health
  • Dr. May Wang joined the faculty as associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences in 2008. She received an undergraduate degree from the National University of Singapore, a master’s degree in nutritional science from the University of Texas at Austin, and master’s and doctorate degrees in public health from the University of California at Berkeley. After obtaining her doctorate degree, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine where she was trained in the emerging field of pediatric bone health research. Since then, she has conducted research related to child obesity and bone health with a focus on addressing health disparities. She is the recipient of several awards, including the Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association and Excellence in Education Award from the California Dietetic Association. Areas of Interest: Social and physical environmental determinants of diet-related conditions with a focus on childhood obesity; immigrant food-related behaviors, and evaluations of nutrition programs for children

  • Julia Belluz

    Julia Belluz
    @JULIAOFTORONTO

    MODERATOR
    Senior Health Correspondent, VOX
  • Julia Belluz is Vox’s senior health correspondent, focused on medicine, science, and public health. She’s covered topics as varied as the anti-vaccine movement, America’s staggering maternal mortality problem, how dark chocolate became a health food, and what makes America’s sickest county so unhealthy. She has also debunked numerous medical misinformation peddlers such as Dr. Oz, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Alex Jones. In 2015, Julia launched Vox’s Show Me the Evidence series, which goes beyond the frenzy of daily headlines to take a deeper look at the state of the science behind pressing health questions, from treatments for chronic back pain to why exercise is not helpful when it comes to weight loss. Before joining Vox, Julia was a Knight Science Journalism fellow at MIT and her writing appeared in a range of international publications, including the BMJ, the Chicago Tribune, the Economist and Economist’s Intelligent Life magazine, the Globe and Mail, the LA Times, Maclean’s, the National Post, Slate, and the Times of London. She holds an MSc from the London School of Economics. She is the recipient of numerous journalism awards, including the 2016 Balles Prize in Critical Thinking, the 2017 American Society of Nutrition Journalism Award, and several Canadian National Magazine Awards. Outside of reporting, she speaks regularly at universities and conferences the world over, and has been a fellow at McMaster University. Follow her on Twitter @juliaoftoronto.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in suicide causes, evidence and prevention
  • Format: Recorded Seminar/Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_12102020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills and Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 1: Understanding Suicide

    Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 2: Stopping Suicide
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar Recording

This is the third part in a three-part symposium on suicide at BUSPH. BUSPH symposia are conversations about things that affect the health of populations. The first two parts looked at the research on causes and evidence around suicide prevention. Given the research, the relatively little progress public health has made on suicide, and worries during this time of economic and social stressors, this part of the symposia explores what public health can do to prevent suicide.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 protective factors that are associated with reduced risk of suicide in youth
  • Discuss importance of partnerships with faith communities in the prevention of suicide
  • Describe effects of stigma and their possible interventions across levels of analysis (individual, interpersonal, structural) on suicide risk among LGBTQ youth
  • List 5 community-based (“non-medical) intervention strategies that have been shown to be effective in preventing suicide
  • Discuss possible reasons and potential interventions for elevated risk of suicide post-discharge from hospitalization for suicidality
  • Discuss the association of suicide risk and the COVID pandemic and possible interventions to address it

Subject Matter Expert

    OPENING REMARKS

  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    PANELIST PRESENTATIONS

  • Sherry Molock

    Associate Professor, George Washington University


  • Mark Hatzenbuehler

    Associate Professor, Harvard
    University

  • Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, PhD, is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Psychology at Harvard. He was previously an Associate Professor (with tenure) and Deputy Chair for Faculty Development and Research Strategy in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia. Dr. Hatzenbuehler received his PhD in clinical psychology from Yale and completed his post-doctoral training in population health at Columbia, where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. Dr. Hatzenbuehler’s work examines the role of stigma in shaping population health inequalities, with a particular focus on the mental health consequences of structural forms of stigma. His research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and through the William T. Grant Foundation Scholars Program. He has received several early career and distinguished contribution awards from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2019, he was one of only 204 social scientists named to the prestigious Highly Cited Researcher List by Clarivate Analytics in recognition of his research influence, as demonstrated by the production of multiple highly-cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in Web of Science. Dr. Hatzenbuehler is an elected fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, the premier honorary organization for scientists working at the interface of behavior and medicine, and he has been appointed to serve on two consensus committees at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


  • Lisa Wexler

    Professor,
    University of
    Michigan

  • Lisa Wexler, Ph.D., MSW is a Professor in the School of Social Work and at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, and her research focuses on suicide prevention, wellness/resilience and praxis. Her community-engaged research engages participants in all levels of the process, responds to cultural and community priorities, and builds on and promotes personal and collective assets. Currently, she is working with community partners test the efficacy of a community mobilization approach to suicide prevention for rural Indigenous communities. The intervention, Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES), showed great promise in a pilot in Northwest Alaska (R34 MH096884) with results that showed learning and behavior change in attendees as well as close associates of participants. The ripple effect is important, and will be further tested in a larger trial in Bering Strait (R01 MH112458)( see: http://www.pc-cares.org/). Dr. Wexler with Drs. Rasmus and Allen (U19 MH113138) are working to identify vital community targets associated with reduced youth suicide risk within 3 rural and remote regions of Alaska. The study is a central component of a center called, Alaska Native Collaborative Hub for Research on Resilience (ANCHRR) (see: https://www.anchrr.org/). Her school-based research utilizes Intergenerational Dialogue Exchange and Action (IDEA)—a participatory research method—to engage young people in efforts to find local strengths, skills and wisdom through cross-generational and community-based investigations that—through the effort–enhance youth possibilities for action and strengthen their social connections within and outside of their home communities. Lastly, she has been working with tribal partners to develop a firearm lethal means restriction intervention called the Family Safety Net, which is a universal, clinic-based brief intervention to increase home safety. These various projects integrate Indigenous knowledge and participation in research to address local needs while maximizing the study’s public health impact.


  • Natalie Riblet

    Assistant Professor, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • Natalie Riblet is a staff psychiatrist at the White River Junction VA Medical Center, where she has both clinical and research roles. She graduated with an MD from Dartmouth Medical School in 2008 and an MPH from Dartmouth in 2012. She completed her residencies at Dartmouth, including general preventive medicine and public health in 2012 as well as general psychiatry in 2014. After completing a VA fellowship in Patient Safety in 2016, she completed a VA New England Early Research Career Development Award in 2019. As part of this VISN1 CDA, she developed a VA adaptation of the successful World Health Organization Brief Intervention and Contact Program. She is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.
    In Natalie’s current research roles, she is focused on identifying and testing interventions to prevent death by suicide. This work is supported through funding from the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center White River Junction and the National Center for Patient Safety Center of Inquiry Program. Natalie was also recently awarded a VA Clinical Science Research & Development (CSR&D) Career Development Award. As part of the award period, Natalie will study a suicide prevention intervention that builds off of her prior work with the goal of improving social connectedness and engagement in treatment after psychiatric hospitalization.


  • Julia Raifman

    Assistant Professor, Boston
    University

  • Julia Raifman, ScD, SM conducts research on how health and social policies drive population health and health disparities. Much of her current work is focused on evaluating how state and federal policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis are shaping the spread of COVID-19 and mental distress during the pandemic. She created the COVID-19 U.S. State Policy Database (CUSP) to facilitate widespread, rapid response research on how state policies are affecting health and well-being: https://tinyurl.com/statepolicies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, her research includes analyses on associations between LGBT rights and mental distress and on associations between state firearm policies and adolescent suicide. She also conducts research on how structural stigma and structural racism shape disparities in the burden of infectious diseases such as HIV and COVID-19. Dr. Raifman's research has been covered in the New York Times, The Guardian, National Public Radio, and The Advocate. Dr. Raifman teaches Quantitative Methods for Health Services and Policy Research. She enjoys mentoring and is committed to promoting the success of diverse students. Dr. Raifman received her doctoral and masters degree from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins prior to joining Boston University.

    MODERATED DISCUSSION

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus's research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this seminar recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

An Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases and their Drivers

Why are zoonoses and vectorborne diseases increasing?

 
    NCHEC logo  

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, veterinarians, human health clinicians, environmental scientists, students, and others interested in zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Format: Recorded screencasts, available on demand
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 4 screencasts, 30 minutes each (2 hours total)
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:

    Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_12152020 . If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion trainings: An Introduction to One Health
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this course

In the first of four screencasts the public health practitioner is introduced to zoonoses and vectorborne diseases and how they differ from other infectious diseases. In subsequent screencasts, the factors (drivers) that influence zoonoses and vectorborne disease are explained, including human systems, human-animal-environment interaction, and environmental change. Multiple disease-specific examples are provided, including COVID-19.

Zoonotic diseases are those that can be passed between humans and other vertebrate animals and vectorborne disease are those that are transmitted by an arthropod vector like a flea or tick. Because non-human animals serve as a disease reservoir or vector, disease prevention and control strategies differ from other infectious diseases. More than half, an estimated 60%, of all the kinds of infections that people can get are zoonotic and 75% of emerging infectious diseases, including COVID-19, are zoonotic. There are many human-driven factors that influence zoonotic disease emergence and re-emergence. These drivers include infrastructure, travel and trade, culture, agricultural intensification, interaction with domestic and wild animals, climate change, land use, and biodiversity. In this series of four screencasts, you will be introduced to zoonotic and vectorborne diseases and their drivers.

What you'll learn

After completing this course, you will be able to...

Introduction to Zoonoses and Vectorborne Diseases

  • Define zoonoses, vectorborne diseases, emerging zoonotic diseases, reverse zoonoses, reservoir host, amplification, dead-end host, and spillover
  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Describe how the following disease prevention and control tools differ for zoonotic and vectorborne diseases: education, surveillance, vector control, diagnostics, outbreak investigation, host identification, and vaccination
  • Define One Health and explain why this approach is useful for addressing zoonotic and vector-borne diseases

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human Systems

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases related to human systems and culture
  • Provide examples of how infrastructure influences zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that have emerged as a result of human travel and trade
  • Provide examples of how culture impacts zoonotic and vectorborne disease

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Human-animal-environment Interactions

  • List key drivers of zoonotic and vectorborne disease related to human-animal interactions
  • Provide examples of diseases that can be spread from pets and livestock to people
  • Explain how agricultural systems influence zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases that can result from human or domestic animal interaction with wildlife

Drivers of Zoonotic Diseases: Environmental Change

  • List three key environmental drivers that impact zoonotic and vectorborne disease
  • Provide examples of zoonotic and vectorborne disease influenced by weather and climate
  • Explain how land use and ecosystem disruption can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases
  • Explain how biodiversity can impact zoonotic and vectorborne diseases

Subject Matter Expert


  • Lynn Zanradi Blevins

Lynn Zanradi Blevins has been practicing public health in government and academic settings for 20 years in the areas of infectious disease, environmental health, emergency preparedness, and One Health (human-animal-environmental health).

Enrollment and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for the course. If you have any trouble accessing the course, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement:

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Self-Paced

LPHI Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate

Do you work in Emergency Preparedness or want to learn more about it? This certificate will give you a broad knowledge base and you will receive a training certificate upon successful completion.

Note: The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate was discontinued from July 1st 2020 due to reduced funding, still 14 Self- paced trainings are available for enrollment.

New England Public Health Training Center
Enroll

Course Information

  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 14 Self-paced trainings and exam
  • Competencies: Emergency Preparedness
  • Learning Level: Awareness through performance
  • Supplemental materials: None

About this course

The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate is produced by the Local Public Health Institute of Massachusetts, in conjunction with the Office of Preparedness and Emergency Management (OPEM) of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Emergency Preparedness Training Certificate has been developed for staff and volunteers from municipal or state agencies across Massachusetts who are responsible for public health emergency preparedness and response activities.

Candidates may include, but not limited to:

  • Board of Health or other governing body members
  • Municipal Compliance Officers or Sanitarians
  • Emergency Preparedness Coordinators
  • Environmental Health Inspectors, Sanitarians, or Specialists
  • Health Agents
  • Health Directors or Commissioners
  • Health Inspectors
  • Public Health Nurses

The Certificate is a bundle of 14 individual trainings that cover a wide breadth of Emergency Preparedness topics. All required trainings are available on-line, 24/7, and can be taken at the candidate’s own pace. If a candidate has completed one of the required trainings within 5 years, they need not take the training again – submission of their previous certificate will be accepted. The majority of the courses are hosted by the LPHI, but some are hosted by other organizations including the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Candidates for this Certificate should move through the list of required trainings at their own pace and in the order of their own choosing. Continuing education credits are awarded for completion of most individual trainings, and vary by topic (generally from one to six contact hours). After completion of each individual training, you will need to upload the certificate of completion for that particular block of the certificate to the appropriate section (details on how to do this are provided in the technical help section below.) Once all individual criteria have been completed and verified, you will be given access to the culminating exam.

This culminating exam, developed by Subject Matter Experts, will test the knowledge and skills gained through the individual trainings. The exam is scenario-based, multiple choice, and open book. Upon successful completion of the exam, candidates are awarded the LPHI Emergency Preparedness Certificate.

Enrollment

To enroll in this training, select the Continue box below.

Enrollment Options Key
For a Certificate of Completion
Enroll-001
To Audit (No Certificate)
Audit-001

Having trouble accessing the course? Contact support@nephtc.org

Category: Self-Paced

Course Information

  • Audience: Members of the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers (MACHW)
  • Format: Online Workshop
  • Date/Time: Thursday July 8, 2021
    10:00 AM to 11:30 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC). MACHW and NEPHTC are pleased to offer a certificate of completion to all attendees and for Mass CHWS who complete this 1.5 hour webinar you will receive 1.5 CEUs for renewal of your CHW certification. Please return to nephtc.org complete the evaluation and you can obtain a downloadable certificate with your name and date of download.
  • Competencies: Effective Communication,

    Cultural Responsiveness and Mediation, Education to Promote Healthy Behavior Change, Use of Public Health Concepts and Approaches, Advocacy and Community Capacity Building

  • Learning Level: Awareness and Performance
  • Companion Trainings: MACHW Workshop Series
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Workshop

This MACHW interactive workshop series aims to support CHWs as they strive to serve their clients during these challenging times. The workshop formats will include expert panels, Q and A, and case studies on critical issues from across Massachusetts.

Community Health Workers are central in supporting the health of the communities they work with, and yet, they are often at risk for burnout themselves due to inequitable work conditions. This workshop will discuss strategies for voice and reflect on how to improve well-being at work.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the connection between workers’ voices and their well-being as individuals, and as a collective group.
  • Discuss benefits of worker unions and strategies for organizing workers in health and social services.
  • Discuss strategies for voicing and improving well-being at work
  • Recognize how systemic oppressions and practices impact our work and well being


Subject Matter Expert

  • Yaminette Diaz

    Yaminette Diaz

  • Yaminette Díaz-Linhart is a PhD candidate at Brandeis University. Her research explores how worker voice and representation impact well-being outcomes for health care and social service workers. She is currently conducting a study to understand the well-being of community health workers in Massachusetts.

  • Yaminette Diaz

    Kimberly Mendoza

  • Kimberly Mendoza Iraheta is a CHW and Regional Chapter Leader in Greater-Boston for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.


  • Lisette Blondet

  • Lissette Blondet is the director of the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers (MACHW). She has dedicated most of her professional life to anchoring community health workers (CHWs) as public health professionals. In 1993, she founded the Community Health Education Center (CHEC), one of the first training and resource centers for CHWs in the country. CHEC’s standards for CHW curricula and core competencies have been replicated in other states. The program was so successful that in 1997, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health funded its expansion to the northeast region of the state. Both centers, CHEC Boston and CHEC Northeast are still thriving and have graduated over a thousand CHWs. More recently, Lissette provided technical assistance to the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund on community health and community health workers. She also previously served as Director of Community Benefits for Cape Cod Healthcare, focusing on making healthcare accessible to the underserved while building her experience in healthcare financing. As the director of MACHW, Lissette brings all her experience and skills to strengthen the association and strategically position the workforce to seize the many opportunities now available through health care reform, including reimbursement and broad recognition of the attributes and competencies of CHWs.


  • Jamie Berberena

  • Jamie Berberena is the Southeast Regional Leader and Advisory Board member with the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers. She is a passionate public health advocate focused on promoting racial equity throughout Massachusetts. With over a decade of experience promoting the health and well-being of diverse communities across Massachusetts by providing direct support and guidance through community-based programs, multi-disciplinary clinical programs and health policy initiatives.


  • Areliz Barbosa

  • Areliz Barbosa is a CHW and is the Regional Chapter Leader for Western Massachusetts for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this workshop. If you have any trouble accessing the workshop, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement

This project is supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program”. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.



To Learn more about the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers please visit: www.machw.org

Category: Blended

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health center personnel who have a direct role in emergency preparedness planning and response, as well as key decision-making staff such as executive directors, operations managers, office managers and facility staff.
  • Format: Blended
  • Price: Free
  • Start Date: January 17, 2017
  • End Date: February 14, 2017
  • Length: Two 90 minute webinars with a one-month team project period in between webinars
  • Competencies: Public Health Preparedness and Response Core Competencies, Domain 3: Plan for and Improve Practice
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Supplemental materials: Course Summary (PDF)
  • Pre-requisites:

About this course

The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge and hands-on planning experience incorporating the Incident Command System (ICS) into your Center’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and customizing ICS tools for your Center’s use. The training will consist of two 90 minute webinars with a team project in between. Webinar #1 will provide an understanding of key incident management concepts for FQHCs, based on the Healthcare Incident Command System (HICS) model, including how it is incorporated into the EOP. Following the webinar, participants will update their Center’s EOP as a team and customize standard HICS tools for their center. Technical assistance will be available to Center teams as requested during the 4-week period between the two webinars. On webinar #2, participants will share their accomplishments and challenges updating their plans and tools followed by a presentation on how to draft and execute a workplace exercise to test their organization’s utilization of HICS.

This training is a collaboration between NEPHTC, the DelValle Institute for Emergency Preparedness and the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers.

What you'll learn

This course provides practical knowledge on how to apply basic HICS principals and concepts in the Community Health Center environment. Successful participants will improve their ability to apply HICS by updating ICS aspects of their EOP and customizing ICS tools for their centers. The training is appropriate for individuals with all levels of experience with emergency operations planning.

After completing this course, you will be able to...

  • Discuss the importance and purpose of utilizing HICS to manage the response to an incident.
  • Discuss how HICS is incorporated into the organizational Emergency Operations Plan (EOP).
  • Describe the primary functions and management principles of HICS.
  • Recognize the key HICS tools and forms used in incident management.
  • Update the organizational EOP to enhance the use of HICS when the plan is activated
  • Select HICS tools and forms to be used within the organization and adapt them as necessary.
  • Provide examples of common challenges updating an organizational EOP and associated HICS tools.
  • Identify initial steps to draft an exercise to test the use of HICS in a simulated EOP activation.
  • Locate resources to support the design and execution of an exercise.
  • Summarize course key concepts

Instructors

Enrollment and Completion

To enroll in this course, please select the Enroll Me button below. Note that centers are strongly encouraged to register as teams of 2 to 5 staff from each Center.

This course is designed for Community Health Center staff. Participants must attend both webinars and participate in the team project in order to receive a NEPHTC Certificate of Completion. Any questions about the program or enrollment can be directed to Kathi Traugh at kathi.traugh@yale.edu or by calling 203-785-2868.

Category: Blended