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Courses with keyword "Public Health Concepts and Tools"

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Practitioners/ Professionals including Community Health Workers
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: September 23, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:

    PM1131137_09232020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None



About this Webinar

"Call-outs happen when people publicly shame each other online, at the office, in classrooms or anywhere humans have a beef with one another. But I believe there are better ways of doing social justice work." _ Loretta Ross, The New York Times, August 17, 2019


What you'll learn

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define Calling Out culture and explain its toxic impact
  • Identifying situations in which Calling Out occurs
  • List three techniques for Calling In for your public health practice


Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Loretta Ross

    Associate Professor at Smith College

Loretta Ross is a Visiting Associate Professor at Smith College in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender for the 2019-2021 academic years.

She started her career in activism and social change in the 1970s, working at the National Football League Players’ Association, the D.C. Rape Crisis Center, the National Organization for Women (NOW), the National Black Women’s Health Project, the Center for Democratic Renewal (National Anti-Klan Network), the National Center for Human Rights Education, and SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, until retiring as an organizer in 2012 to teach about activism. Her passion transforms anger into social justice to change the world.

Her most recent books are Reproductive Justice: An Introduction co-written with Rickie Solinger, and Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundations, Theory, Practice, Critique, both published in 2017. Her forthcoming book is Calling In the Calling Out Culture: Detoxing Our Movement due out in 2020.

She has appeared on CNN, BET, "Lead Story," "Good Morning America," "The Donahue Show," the National Geographic Channel, and "The Charlie Rose Show.” She has been quoted in the New York Times, Time Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post, among others.

Her activism began as a rape and incest survivor as a teen mother. She graduated college at age 55. She is from San Antonio, TX and lives in Atlanta, GA. She is a mother and grandmother, and an avid pinochle player. Her dream is to see Venus and Serena Williams play tennis in person.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Building Community through Outdoor Activities: Teenagers During Physical Distancing

How can outdoor time, either at home or at school, enhance social and emotional learning and build a sense of emotional well-being and belonging?

MPHA logo   logo_NEPHTCCHES logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professional, educators
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: September 21, 2021
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_09212020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Program Planning Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

As the Coronavirus impacts our lifestyles, schools are pivoting to prioritize children’s health and well-being above academic considerations. Access to the outdoors during the school day, through co-curricular activities, at home and within a community is part of a systemic approach to Social and Emotional Learning and addresses critical issues of public health.

Outdoor activities are a great way to address the five core competencies of social and emotional learning while increasing self-esteem, improving mood and reducing anxiety. This session highlights the benefits of spending time outdoors and offers a series of physically distanced activities that build Self-Management, Self-Awareness, Social Awareness, Relationship Skills and Responsible Decision Making.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the benefits of outdoor time
  • Learn strategies and activities to support SEL in the outdoors
  • Know how to do an inventory of outdoor spaces for learning
  • Consider partnering or hosting an outing club for your community

Subject Matter Expert

  • Alicia Heyburn
    Alicia Heyburn, MS

Alicia Heyburn is Executive Director of Teens to Trails, a non-profit working throughout Maine to connect high school students with life changing outdoor experiences. She is a Registered Maine Guide, Wilderness First Responder, and co-leader of The Ladies Adventure Club, an outing club for Maine women.  Here is an article of the work Teens to Trails is doing in Brunswick, ME.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Practitioners/ Professionals including Community Health Workers
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: October 28, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_10282020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None


About this Webinar

What is the potential paradigm shift of applying human rights standards to your public health practice?


What you'll learn

At the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define human rights
  • Apply questions to identify changes necessary for using human rights standards in your public health practice
  • Describe 2 websites for definitive resources for human rights standards

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Loretta Ross

    Associate Professor at Smith College

Loretta Ross is a Visiting Associate Professor at Smith College in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender for the 2019-2021 academic years.

She started her career in activism and social change in the 1970s, working at the National Football League Players’ Association, the D.C. Rape Crisis Center, the National Organization for Women (NOW), the National Black Women’s Health Project, the Center for Democratic Renewal (National Anti-Klan Network), the National Center for Human Rights Education, and SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, until retiring as an organizer in 2012 to teach about activism. Her passion transforms anger into social justice to change the world.

Her most recent books are Reproductive Justice: An Introduction co-written with Rickie Solinger, and Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundations, Theory, Practice, Critique, both published in 2017. Her forthcoming book is Calling In the Calling Out Culture: Detoxing Our Movement due out in 2020.

She has appeared on CNN, BET, "Lead Story," "Good Morning America," "The Donahue Show," the National Geographic Channel, and "The Charlie Rose Show.” She has been quoted in the New York Times, Time Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post, among others.

Her activism began as a rape and incest survivor as a teen mother. She graduated college at age 55. She is from San Antonio, TX and lives in Atlanta, GA. She is a mother and grandmother, and an avid pinochle player. Her dream is to see Venus and Serena Williams play tennis in person.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: September 10, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: 09102020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), an institute of the NIH since 1962, has been providing free, quality, evidence-based resources to libraries, community-based organizations and more, but many public health organizations are not familiar with what NLM has to offer them. This session will provide attendees with an overview of the health information resources available from the National Library of Medicine, best practices for integrating these resources into public health work, and the services, grant funding, and support for public health provided by the Network of the National Library of Medicine New England Region.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify health information resources and services available from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) that are available for free to organizations and individuals.
  • Employ health information resources from the NLM applicable for public health practice.
  • Select relevant databases and resources from NLM and NNLM for different aspects of public health practice.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sarah Levin-Lederer
    Sarah Levin-Lederer

Since 2018, Sarah Levin-Lederer has worked as an Outreach and Education Coordinator with the Network of the National Library of Medicine-New England Region specializing in connecting public health, emergency preparedness and community-based organizations with National Library of Medicine and Network of the National Library of Medicine health literacy and information services and resources with trainings, grant support, and webinars. After earning her Master of Public Health from Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) in 2012, Sarah worked for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health engaging community partners through health education and programming with an emphasis on the Free Library of Philadelphia, and immigrant and homeless serving organizations.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Media, Social Media and COVID-19

What roles have media and social media played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath?

logo_NEPHTC 
Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus response and health after the pandemic.
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday April 23, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04232020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

    Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar will explore the roles that media and social media have played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath. Hosted in collaboration with WBUR.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence for negative health consequences of excessive exposure to media
  • Identify evidence-based recommendations for how media cover and report experiences such as COViD-19 pandemic
  • Name 7 traits of crisis news reporting that enhance its benefit to the public
  • Identify potential avenues of research about the association of media coverage and consumption on public health
  • Name 5 ways consumers can assess the trust-worthiness of media coverage

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Margaret Low

    Chief Executive Officer, WBUR
    Boston’s NPR News Station

  • Margaret Low is the CEO of WBUR, Boston’s NPR News Station. Low joined WBUR after five years at The Atlantic and before that a long and distinguished career at NPR. At WBUR, she leads one of public radio’s premier stations, with the biggest newsroom in the system. In addition to its rich local reporting, WBUR produces a slate of national programs, on air and online, that reach millions of people. Before joining WBUR, Low was a Senior Vice President at The Atlantic and President of its events division. AtlanticLIVE produces more than 100 editorial events a year across the country. Prior to The Atlantic, Low was NPR’s Senior Vice President for News, where she ran the award winning news division and the work of 400+ journalists. Low also spent nine years as NPR’s Vice President for Programming, where she developed the live events strategy for the hit show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and oversaw all program acquisitions including Car Talk and Fresh Air.


  • Roxane Cohen Silver

    Professor of Psychological Science, Medicine, and Public Health, University of California Irvine

  • Roxane Cohen Silver, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, the Department of Medicine, and the Program in Public Health at the University of California, Irvine, where she has been actively involved in research, teaching, mentoring and administration since 1989. An international expert in the field of stress and coping, she has spent the past three decades studying acute and long-term psychological and physical reactions to stressful life experiences, including personal traumas such as physical disability, loss, and childhood sexual victimization, as well as larger collective events such as war, firestorms, the Columbine High School shootings, the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and other community disasters across the world (including the 2010 8.8 earthquake in Chile and the 2006 destructive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia). Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the US Public Health Service. Since December 2003, Dr. Silver has served on numerous senior advisory committees and task forces for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, providing ongoing advice to DHS and its component agencies on the psychological impact of disasters and terrorism. She is also one of the founding Directors of Psychology Beyond Borders, an international nonprofit organization that facilitates research, intervention and policy development in the prevention, preparedness and response to terror attacks, conflict, or natural disasters across the world. Dr. Silver is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (in 4 Divisions) and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2007 Dr. Silver received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Service to Psychological Science and in 2010 she received the Public Advocacy Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (for “outstanding and fundamental contributions to advancing social understanding of trauma”). In 2011 she received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (Senior Career) and the Award for Outstanding Service to the Field of Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division 56 (Trauma Psychology).


  • Elana Newman

    McFarlin Professor of Psychology
    University of
    Tulsa

  • Elana Newman, McFarlin Professor of Psychology at the University of Tulsa, has conducted research on a variety of topics regarding the psychological and physical response to traumatic life events, assessment of PTSD in children and adults, journalism and trauma, and understanding the impact of participating in trauma-related research from the trauma survivor’s perspective. She is a past president of the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies, the world’s premier organization dedicated to trauma treatment, education, research, public policy concerns and theoretical formulation. Her work in journalism and trauma has focused on occupational health of journalists and she and her students have several studies underway examining the effects of journalistic practice upon consumers. She was the key investigator on the Dart Center’s research survey on photojournalists’ exposure to trauma. She co-directed the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma’s first satellite office in NYC after 9-11.


  • Mariette DiChristina

    Dean, Boston University College of Communication, Science journalist.

  • Mariette DiChristina is the dean of the College of Communication at Boston University and a nationally recognized science journalist. Before arriving in 2019, DiChristina was the editor-in-chief and executive vice president of Scientific American, as well as executive vice president, magazines, of the magazine’s publisher, Springer Nature. The first woman to head Scientific American since its founding in 1845, she led the editorial team to honors including the coveted National Magazine Award for General Excellence. In her Springer Nature role, she oversaw an editorial and publishing staff of more than 160 people across 10 countries. Previously, DiChristina served as president of the National Association of Science Writers and as executive editor of Popular Science, where she was named Editor of the Year by the magazine’s publisher, Times Mirror Magazines. She also served as a part-time associate professor and visiting scholar in the graduate Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism and a science writer in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Boston University recognized her work in 2016 with a Distinguished Alumni Award. Beyond her role as dean, DiChristina chairs the Steering Group for the “Top 10 Emerging Technologies” for the World Economic Forum and is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She served as a committee member of the Climate Communications Initiative for the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation advocating for federal funding of basic scientific research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

How has this pandemic sharpened our thinking around how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post COVID era?

logo_NEPHTC 
Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and thinking on climate change
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, May 14, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 05142020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. The pandemic has sharpened our thinking and informed insights around climate change, impacting how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post-COVID era.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe health effects and their costs as a result of climate change
  • Name 5 interventions that benefit both health and climate
  • Name 3 lessons from COVID-19 experience that inform climate change action
  • Explain the influence of both COVID-19 and climate change on health inequity

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Mona Sarfaty

    Director, Program for Climate and Health, George Mason
    University

  • Mona Sarfaty, MD MPH FAAFP, is the Director of the Program on Climate and Health in the Center for Climate Change Communication. The Program collaborates with medical societies and research organizations to increase awareness, research, and preventive activity regarding the health effects of climate change. As a family medicine professor and physician for over 30 years, Dr. Sarfaty has engaged in research and teaching focused on primary care, cancer screening, and public policy, including the health effects of climate change. She has lectured at national and regional venues including medical societies, health plans, health departments, professional organizations, and government conferences. Dr. Sarfaty is the author of widely circulated guides and articles on how to increase cancer screening rates in practice and on improving practice outcomes by using the features of the patient centered medical home. Since 2003, Dr. Sarfaty has been on the faculty of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia as Associate Professor of Family Medicine. She has engaged in research, teaching, and patient care. She has held a joint appointment in the Jefferson School of Population Health. From 1992-2003, she was on the faculty of the George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center with a joint appointment in the GWU School of Public Health and Health Services. During her years at GWU, she was the Medical Director of the Montgomery County Cancer Crusade and the Primary Care Coalition of Montgomery County, and the Founding Director of the Community Oriented Primary Care Track of the MPH Program. From 1985-92, Dr. Sarfaty served as the Associate Director for Health Policy and Senior Health Policy Advisor for the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources (the principal authorizing committee in the Senate for health programs). She authored major pieces of legislation, planned hearings, and advised Senators on both sides of the aisle. Dr. Sarfaty has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians since 1980. She is a long time member of American Public Health Association (APHA), where she has served as Chair and Governing Councilor of the Medical Care Section. She also served on the Board of Directors for the Association of Prevention Teachers and Researchers (APTR), the professional arm of the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sarfaty is an invited member of the distinguished National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. She has received many awards for her work. Selected publications are listed below.


  • Renee Salas

    Yerby Fellow, Center for Climate, Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public  Health

  • Renee N. Salas, MD, MPH, MS is a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an emergency medicine physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). She received her Doctor of Medicine from the innovative five-year medical school program to train physician-investigators at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. She concurrently obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Research from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she received a Master of Public Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with a concentration in environmental health while completing a Fellowship in Wilderness Medicine at MGH. She now has a sole academic concentration on climate change and health. As a 2018 Burke Fellow, she is addressing the current research gaps in this field. She served as the lead for the 2018 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change U.S. Brief and is a nationally recognized leader on this subject.


  • Jalonne White-Newsome

    Senior Program
    Officer,
    The Kresge
    Foundation

  • Jalonne L. White-Newsome is a senior program officer at The Kresge Foundation, responsible for the Environment Program’s grant portfolio on Climate Resilient and Equitable Water Systems (CREWS). Jalonne is also a core team member of Kresge’s Climate Change, Health and Equity Initiative, supporting grantmaking across the public health sector. Before joining Kresge in 2016, Jalonne served as director of federal policy at West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. (WE ACT), where she led national campaigns to ensure that the concerns of low-income communities of color were integrated into federal policy, particularly on issues of clean air, climate change and health. She is an adjunct professor at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. As a researcher on climate, health and equity, Jalonne was a lead author for the human health chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. She provides leadership on various boards, including the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Change and Society, the US Climate Action Network, Health Environmental Funder’s Network Steering Committee and the Urban Water Funder’s Group. A native of Detroit, Jalonne earned a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Southern Methodist University and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University. Jalonne has recently been recognized by Who’s Who in America, The Environmental Management Association’s Environmental Achievement Award, the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and is a 2017 PLACES Fellow alum with The Funders Network.


  • Greg Wellenius

    Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Gregory Wellenius is an associate professor of epidemiology in the Brown School of Public Health. His research focuses on the environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, including in China. Much of his work has examined the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of cardiovascular events and its effects on cardiovascular physiology. In the context of these studies, he has used tools from the fields of epidemiology and toxicology to: 1) evaluate the association between environmental exposures and disease, 2) identify subgroups of the population that may be particularly susceptible, and 3) elucidate the physiologic mechanisms for the observed effects. Wellenius has served as a research consultant to the Chinese government’s Center for Disease Control (CDC), and is currently engaged with the Chinese CDC in collaborative empirical research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Health Literacy Response to COVID-19

How do we make sure everyone understands public health information during the time of a crisis?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community Health Workers and public health professionals working with medically underserved communities
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: July 22, 2020
    2:00 PM - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_07222020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites Basic understanding of COVID 19

About this Webinar

Accurate information is critical to control the spread of COVID 19. However, obtaining and understanding accurate information can be a challenge for populations of various health literacy levels which in turn can increase risk of illness. This webinar will discuss the challenges experienced by populations of various health literacy levels in obtaining important information about COVID 19 and strategies and resources on how to address the barriers and promote health equity.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how limited health literacy adversely affects access to accurate and reliable health information during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Apply health literacy and plain language principles to improve communication regarding COVID-19 and what to do about it
  • Identify resources and responses to the COVID-19 pandemic available for use to meet the health literacy, language and culture needs of diverse communities

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi is principal of Kurtz-Rossi & Associates, a women-owned business located in Boston, Massachusetts. Her work has two major sources of inspiration. One is the adult learners she works with to integrate health and literacy education in Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) settings and the other is all the teachers, librarians, and health professionals who are dedicated to improving access to health information and health services for multi-lingual and multi-cultural communities. As a health literacy consultant, Sabrina’s areas of expertise include:

  • Health literacy professional development teaching and training
  • Plain language writing and editing
  • Easy-to-read materials and website development
  • ABE and ESOL health literacy curriculum development
  • Evaluation to assess effectiveness and for program improvement
Ms. Kurtz-Rossi is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Health Literacy Leadership Institute at Tufts University School of Medicine. She is also an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University and University of New England where she teaches online health literacy and plain language graduate level courses.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional professionals serving communities of concern
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 23, 2020
    11:00 - 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours:  If you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour and the contact hour(s) for this course may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. You may want to check with your credentialing body if you’re unsure if this course meets its continuing education requirements.
  • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Participants will explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and this new moment in the civil rights movement for Black lives through a lens of trauma-informed care. The workshop will cover self- and community care, self-reflection for allyship and liberation, and resiliency-building through a lens of racial and gender justice.



What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify tools for self- and community care to help sustain health workers in a critical time
  • Name Principles of Trauma-Informed Care and some ways they can be applied to daily work with colleagues and clients/ patients
  • Think about how to hold trauma-informed, healing-centered space to talk about some of the major changes happening in our society right now.
  • Deepen a self-reflection practice for resiliency-building and improved collaboration.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Samantha Calero
    Samantha Calero

Samantha Isabel Calero (Sam, she/her) is a biracial Latinx public health consultant. Her work includes training and facilitation, technical assistance, policy analysis and development and organizational capacity building to address trauma, resiliency, racial and gender justice. She approaches her work with an intersectional, margins-to-center lens of relationship building and critical analysis for change. Sam is a member of Mijente and currently is completing her master's degree in health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She lives in Roxbury with her daughter.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

About this Webinar

Instead of an all-or-nothing approach to risk prevention, we need an approach that allows people to live their lives while reducing their risk.  What does harm reduction look like for the coronavirus?

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the principles of harm reduction as a public health approach
  • Apply the principle of harm reduction to the current COVID -19 pandemic
  • Discuss the intersection of harm reduction and institutional racism

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Linette Liebling, MSPH

Linette Liebling, MSPH, has worked as a Public Health educator for over three decades. Ms. Liebling trains CHWs, clinic and hotline counselors, case managers, school health educators, youth workers, and other community health educators on strategies of behavior change as well as various sexual health topics. She is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Psychology Department at Wheaton College where she has taught since 2006.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Control and Prevention Strategies in Epidemics

How do we get to the end of the outbreak? Learn how to monitor and follow outbreaks once control measures are in place.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 22, 2020
    2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_06222020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

For all outbreaks, the notion is to “break the chain” and to break it in as many places as possible. These processes have to balance civic liberty, community motivation and ownership, as well as economic stability. We will look at both nonpharmaceutical interventions for pandemic control, including physical distancing and contact tracing, and the promise of vaccination and case management tools, such as drugs, that influence the course and outcome. We will discuss monitoring and following outbreaks to assess the adequacy of control measures and the trade-offs, and use stories from Ebola, COVID-19 and other outbreaks to illustrate these concepts.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe purpose of outbreak response.
  • Describe factors that influence the decision to implement control measures.
  • Describe common response and control measures used during outbreaks and emergencies.
  • Define appropriate interventions for different modes of transmission.
  • Discuss the importance of monitoring the effectiveness of outbreak response.
  • Name 2 indicators to monitor the effectiveness of outbreak response.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sharon McDonnell
    Sharon McDonnell, BSN, MD, MPH

Sharon received her BSN at the University of Florida and MD from the University of California, San Diego. After training in Family Medicine, she went to Pakistan/Afghanistan to work with NGOs and then WHO. She joined the US CDC as an EIS Officer and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health. She has worked in the state health departments in Florida and Vermont. After CDC She was on Faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and has continued to do work in International Disease Surveillance and Response and Epidemiology Training. She worked in Liberia for 2 years for the Ebola response with IRC and CSTE/CDC. Currently she teaches epidemiology with the University of New Hampshire and consults with the Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the Maine Medical Center. She helps co-found the Yarmouth Community Coronavirus Task Force in Yarmouth Maine.

  • Katherine Nenninger
    Katherine Nenninger, MD

Katherine went to medical school at the University of Virginia and completed an internal medicine residency at Maine Medical Center. She is currently in the Leadership in Preventive Medicine Fellowship training program through Maine Medical Center, which is a training program that includes public health coursework through the University of New England, clinical healthcare, and projects related to population medicine.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

What are the long-tail health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic? How will the social and economic changes from the pandemic shape population health in coming years and decades?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and economic downturn
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 16, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04162020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the long-tail health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. The experts will examine the social and economic changes that have emerged as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and how these changes will shape population health in the coming years and decades.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence that may imply possible negative effects of COVID pandemic on in utero effects on developing fetus
  • Describe evidence for negative health consequences from previous economic downturns
  • Identify major risk factors and mitigating factors for long-term adverse economic consequences of pandemic
  • Describe health outcomes of people who entered the labor market at times of economic recessions

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Janet Currie

    Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University

  • Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Co-director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Wellbeing. She also co-directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is the President of the American Society of Health Economics, has served as the Vice President of the American Economics Association, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and of the American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Society of Labor Economists, and of the Econometric Society, and has honorary degrees from the University of Lyon and the University of Zurich. She was named a Nomis Distinguished Scientist in 2018. She has served on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science, as the Editor of the Journal of Economic Literature, and on the editorial boards of many other journals. Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, and the important role of mental health.


  • Catherine Maclean

    Associate Professor, Temple University, Co-Editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis and Mgmt.

  • Professor Maclean’s research uses health and labor economic theory to empirically explore the causes and consequences of substance use, mental health, insurance coverage, and labor market outcomes. She is particularly interested in the role of public policies in influencing these outcomes. Professor Maclean is a Research Associate in the Health Economics Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics. She is a Co-Editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. Her recent work examines the effect of insurance regulations, tobacco control regulations, and access to healthcare services. Professor Maclean’s research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the American Cancer Society.


  • Arjumand Siddiqi

     Associate Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

  • Arjumand Siddiqi is Canada Research Chair in Population Health Equity and Associate Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, where she also holds appointments in the Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and the Hospital For Sick Children, as well as at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
    Dr. Siddiqi is interested in understanding how societal conditions produce and resolve inequities in population health and human development across the lifespan. Her research focuses primarily on the roles of resource inequities and social policies, the methods and metrics that enable scientific inquiry on health inequities, and mechanisms related to public and political uptake of evidence.
    Dr. Siddiqi is an alumnus of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Global Academy and former Associate Member of its Program on Successful Societies. She was also a member of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health Knowledge Hub on Early Child Development, and has consulted to several international agencies including the World Bank and UNICEF. Dr. Siddiqi received her doctorate in Social Epidemiology from Harvard School of Public Health.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

What is the role of cities in creating the conditions for health, particularly in a time of pandemic? How can cities be rebuilt with a focus on resilience and on promoting healthy populations?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic, design and urban infrastructure
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 30, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04302020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar will explore the role of cities in creating the conditions for health, particularly in a time of pandemic. It will address how cities can be rebuilt with a focus on resilience and on promoting healthy populations. Cohosted with the Boston University Initiative on Cities.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe principal design considerations for adaptation during pandemic
  • Name 5 practical ways to create more space for people going forward
  • Name 3 design elements in health care settings that have been prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Describe 4 ways in which “resiliency” can be reflected in redesigning urban infrastructure
  • Describe 4 methods to foster “green” infrastructure and environment

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Jennifer Keesmaat, CEO

    The Keesmaat Group
    and
    Former Chief Planner
    Toronto

  • Jennifer Keesmaat is an urban planner passionate about creating places where people flourish. Named one of the “most powerful people in Canada” by Macleans, one of the “most influential” by Toronto Life, and one of the top Women of Influence in Canada, she spent five years as Toronto’s Chief City Planner, where she was celebrated for her forward thinking and collaborative approach to city-building.
    A Distinguished Visitor in Residence Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Keesmaat continues to share her vision for cities of the future, and her belief in the importance of public sector leadership through a variety of publications including The Guardian, Macleans, The Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and on her podcast, Invisible City. Keesmaat is on the Advisory Board of the Urban Land Institute, Toronto, and is appointed to the International Panel of Experts, Singapore Urban Redevelopment Authority.
    Over the past fifteen years, as a founding partner of the Office for Urbanism and subsequently Dialog, Keesmaat worked in municipalities across Canada and around the world on urban design guidelines, official plan reviews and strategies for creating dense, walkable cities. Her planning practice is characterized by an emphasis on collaborations across sectors, and broad engagement with municipal staff, councils, developers, business leaders, NGO’s, and residents associations. Keesmaat has been recognized for her expertise in transit planning, heritage preservation, strategy development, communications, sustainable economic development and the creation of walkable, complete communities.
    In 2018, Keesmaat ran for Mayor in the City of Toronto on a progressive, visionary platform that included addressing the housing crisis by building at scale on city-owned land and implementing a Rent-to-Own program; neighbourhood-based crime prevention through the development of Community Wellbeing Plans for each neighbourhood in the city; redesigning city streets to prioritize vulnerable users such as children, seniors, pedestrian and cyclists; the development of five Cultural Hubs to instigate renewal outside of the core; and the tearing down of the Gardiner Expressway to build a new walkable, transit-oriented waterfront neighbourhood community.
    Keesmaat has a Combined Honours degree in Philosophy and English from the University of Western Ontario, and a Masters in Environmental Studies, Politics and Planning, from York University. As a Registered Professional Planner, her work has been repeatedly recognized by professional associations, including as the recipient of the 2016 President’s Award of Excellence, from the Canadian Institute of Planners; the 2016 Bryden Alumni Award, York University, the 2017 City Builders Award from EDIT/the Design Exchange; the International Placemaking Award, City of Lyon, France 2017; and most recently, the 2019 The Edmund N. Bacon Award from the Center for Architecture and Design, Philadelphia.
    Her award-winning and widely acclaimed podcast can be found at invisiblecitypodcast.com. In it, she talks about a broad range of future city and technological topics, including access to food security in The Cauliflower Crisis, how to plan for autonomous vehicles in The Future of the City, The Future of the Car; and the opportunity of raising kids in dense, urban environments in 5 Kids, One Condo. Jennifer also brings light to the biggest challenges facing cities in her Within Reach podcast, in partnership with Newstalk 1010.


  • Katie Swenson

    Senior Principal
    MASS Design
    Group
    Boston, MA

  • Katie joined MASS in 2020 as a Senior Principal. Before joining MASS full time, she served as a board member for three years, providing insight on how design practice promotes economic and social equity, environmental sustainability, and healthy communities. Previously the vice president of Design & Sustainability at Enterprise Community Partners, Inc., she is an expert in affordable housing, community development, and leadership cultivation.
    A member of the second class of Enterprise Rose Fellowship, Swenson was tapped to grow and lead the program in 2007, after completing her fellowship with the Piedmont Housing in Charlottesville. Under her leadership, Swenson has recruited and mentored 85 fellows who are the next generation of leaders in architecture and community development.
    Following her Rose fellowship, Swenson founded the Charlottesville Community Design Center in Charlottesville and, in partnership with Habitat for Humanity, led it to establish an international design competition. Based on the innovations that emerged from the competition and work, she co-authored “Growing Urban Habitats: Seeking a New Housing Development Model” with William Morrish and Susanne Schindler.
    Katie has taught at the Boston Architectural College and Parsons School of Design at The New School, and lectured extensively on sustainable community development and affordable housing. She holds a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from the University of California-Berkeley and a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. She was a 2018-2019 Loeb Fellow at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.
    She is the author of the forthcoming publication, “Design With Love,” stories from 20 years of the Enterprise Rose Fellowship, with photography by Harry Connolly. The book will be published in August 2020 by Schiffer Publishing.


  • Joan Saba

    Healthcare architecture and
    planning
    Partner, NBBJ

  • Specializing in healthcare architecture and planning, Joan Saba brings more than 25 years of expertise and strategic vision to all types of healthcare projects, with a focus on academic medical centers, pediatric and teaching hospitals.
    Joan’s expertise in translating current and future programmatic and operational needs into effective healing environments is applied to projects of diverse scales. She has developed long-term client relationships with a range of prestigious healthcare organizations and has advised on some of the nation’s most pressing healthcare design issues. Joan is a trusted advisor to boards and senior management teams in developing and implementing strategies and capital planning tailored to specific organizational needs.
    She has recently led the healthcare planning and design efforts on the Kimmel Pavilion at New York University’s Langone Medical Center and a new medical center at the American University of Beirut. Her recent work on the Massachusetts General Hospital Lunder Building has won numerous design and industry awards, including a National Healthcare Design Award from the AIA Academy of Architecture for Health.
    Recognized as an industry expert and dynamic educator, Joan is frequently asked to lecture and teach on trends and innovations in the planning and design of academic healthcare and pediatric environments. She was recently interviewed by Forbes China and Chinese Business News Weekly on recommendations to improve healthcare in China. Recent speaking engagements include presentations at Stanford Medicine X, The Economist Health Care Forum, the Academy of Architecture for Health, Harvard University Graduate School of Design’s Executive Education Program, and the Symposium of Healthcare Design. In 2012, Joan was named as one of Healthcare Design magazine’s HCD 10. She was also a recipient of the AIA / Academy of Architecture for Health’s Presidential Citation Award and was included in Healthcare Design’s list of “Twenty Who Are Making a Difference.”


  • Katharine Lusk

    Executive Director, Boston
    University Initiative on Cities

  • Katharine Lusk is the founding Executive Director of the Initiative on Cities at Boston University where she spearheads new university-wide programs and research, including the Menino Survey of Mayors, student government fellowships, original urban scholarship and multi-stakeholder conferences. She also serves as Senior Personnel to the NSF-funded Smart City Cloud Platform project directed by the Hariri Institute and on the Advisory Board of the BU Urban Affairs and City Planning program.
    Katharine was a policy advisor to former Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, where she led his work to make Boston the first city in the country to achieve pay equity for women. In addition to creating the Mayor’s Women’s Workforce Council, she authored, “Boston: Closing the Wage Gap,” identifying evidence-based interventions employers can take to close the gender wage gap. An enthusiastic civic entrepreneur, Katharine launched a new capital fund for child care providers, a platform for women small business owners, Women on Main, and the nation’s first mobile City Hall, City Hall to Go.
    In 2014, she served as an advisor to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s Successful Women, Successful Families Task Force. Prior to entering public service, Katharine worked as a brand strategist and researcher for Fortune 500 companies. She was most recently the VP/Director of Branding with McCann Erickson, the global advertising agency.
    She received a Masters in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where she was the recipient of the Barbara Jordan Award for Women’s Leadership and the Manuel Carballo Award for her graduate thesis modeling state-run paid family leave for Massachusetts. She earned her BA from Williams College.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and mental health
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 9, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04092020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the challenges public health faces in a time of crisis. The speakers will discuss the response to the pandemic from a city and state perspective and what a more effective public health system might look like.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.

NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Name 6 current challenges faced by public health systems
  • Explain why risk communication is a vital component of public health
  • Name 3 characteristics of successful public health crisis response
  • Identify 6 current efforts to improve public health systems based on gaps illuminated by COVID-19

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Georges Benjamin

    Executive Director
    American Public
    Health
    Association

  • Georges Benjamin is known as one of the nation’s most influential physician leaders because he speaks passionately and eloquently about the health issues having the most impact on our nation today. From his firsthand experience as a physician, he knows what happens when preventive care is not available and when the healthy choice is not the easy choice. As executive director of APHA since 2002, he is leading the Association’s push to make America the healthiest nation in one generation.
    He came to APHA from his position as secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Benjamin became secretary of health in Maryland in April 1999, following four years as its deputy secretary for public health services. As secretary, Benjamin oversaw the expansion and improvement of the state’s Medicaid program.
    Benjamin, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board-certified in internal medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a fellow emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians and an honorary fellow of the Royal Society of Public Health.
    An established administrator, author and orator, Benjamin started his medical career in 1981 in Tacoma, Wash., where he managed a 72,000-patient visit ambulatory care service as chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at the Madigan Army Medical Center and was an attending physician within the Department of Emergency Medicine. A few years later, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he served as chief of emergency medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. After leaving the Army, he chaired the Department of Community Health and Ambulatory Care at the District of Columbia General Hospital. He was promoted to acting commissioner for public health for the District of Columbia and later directed one of the busiest ambulance services in the nation as interim director of the Emergency Ambulance Bureau of the District of Columbia Fire Department.
    At APHA, Benjamin also serves as publisher of the nonprofit’s monthly publication, The Nation’s Health, the association’s official newspaper, and the American Journal of Public Health, the profession’s premier scientific publication. He is the author of more than 100 scientific articles and book chapters. His recent book The Quest for Health Reform: A Satirical History is an exposé of the nearly 100-year quest to ensure quality affordable health coverage for all through the use of political cartoons.
    Benjamin is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (Formally the Institute of Medicine) of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine and also serves on the boards for many organizations including Research!America and the Reagan-Udall Foundation. In 2008, 2014 and 2016 he was named one of the top 25 minority executives in health care by Modern Healthcare Magazine, in addition to being voted among the 100 most influential people in health care from 2007-2017.
    In April 2016, President Obama appointed Benjamin to the National Infrastructure Advisory Council, a council that advises the president on how best to assure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure.


  • Mary Bassett

    Former Commissioner of Health, Director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

  • Mary T. Bassett is the Director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University, as well as the FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health. With more than 30 years of experience in public health, Dr. Mary Travis Bassett has dedicated her career to advancing health equity. Prior to her directorship at the FXB Center, Dr. Bassett served for four years as commissioner of Health for New York City. As commissioner, she worked to ensure that every New York City neighborhood supported the health of its residents, with the goal of closing gaps in population health across the city.
    Originally from New York City, Dr. Bassett lived in Zimbabwe for nearly 20 years. Previously, she was the Program Director for the African Health Initiative and the Child Well-being Program at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. She received her B.A. in History and Science from Harvard University and her M.D. from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. She served her medical residency at Harlem Hospital Center, and has a master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Washington, where she was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar.


  • John Auerbach

    Former Commissioner of Public Health, President and CEO, Trust for America’s Health

  • John Auerbach is president and CEO of Trust for America’s Health (TFAH). As such he oversees TFAH’s work to promote sound public health policy and make disease prevention a national priority. Over the course of a 30-year career he has held senior public health positions at the federal, state, and local levels. As Associate Director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) he oversaw policy and the agency’s collaborative efforts with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, commercial payers, and large health systems. During his six years as the Commissioner of Public Health for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, he developed innovative programs to promote health equity, combat chronic and infectious disease, and support the successful implementation of the state’s health care reform initiative. As Boston’s health commissioner for nine years, he directed homeless, substance abuse, and emergency medical services for the city as well as a wide range of public health divisions.
    Mr. Auerbach was previously a professor of practice in health sciences and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research and Practice at Northeastern University; program director of one of the country’s first community health centers; and an administrator in a clinical training program at a tertiary care safety-net hospital.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Looking at Data in an Outbreak

Are you curious about how a hypothesis is developed to implement outbreak control measures? Learn more about descriptive epidemiology and outbreak investigation.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 15, 2020
    2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_06152020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

This session emphasizes descriptive epidemiology using data collected during outbreak investigation. We will be answering what information do we collect during outbreak investigation to build towards developing a hypothesis that we can use to implement control measures or conduct research?


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Use the categories of Who, Where, What, When to characterize an outbreak.
  • Manage outbreak information coming such as making a line list.
  • Name the ways that data is organized to address these categories.
  • Describe how to include qualitative data into field investigations. 
  • Describe how an epi curve is made and what it can tell us about an outbreak.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Gib Parris, MD

Gib trained in laboratory medicine, pathology, and epidemiology and spent 20 years at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At the CDC, he worked on environmental health problems, improving mortality data, assisting state health departments with public health assessment activities, and improving national and state health information systems. After retiring from CDC, he has worked as a consultant on various population-health information-related projects, most recently on the Reportable Condition Knowledge Management system, which is identifying and evaluating potential cases of reportable conditions using data from electronic health records.

  • Richard Shen
    Richard Shen, MD

Richard received his medical degree from the University of Virginia. He has completed internal medicine residency training at Maine Medical Center, and he is currently an infectious diseases fellow at Maine Medical Center.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Investigating an Outbreak

Have you ever wanted to be a detective? Unleash your inner Nancy Drew and learn how to investigate an outbreak, step by step!

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 8, 2020
    2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_06082020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

In this webinar, we will describe the process of outbreak investigation in confirmed events and continue the steps of field outbreak investigation. We will use COVID-19 and smaller outbreaks to illustrate these steps.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the steps of outbreak investigation.
  • Given a scenario, place the steps in order.
  • Using COVID-19 as an example, practice developing outbreak and surveillance case definitions.
  • Describe how to conduct active case finding to find cases systematically.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Sharon McDonnell
    Sharon McDonnell, BSN, MD, MPH

Sharon received her BSN at the University of Florida and MD from the University of California, San Diego. After training in Family Medicine, she went to Pakistan/Afghanistan to work with NGOs and then WHO. She joined the US CDC as an EIS Officer and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health. She has worked in the state health departments in Florida and Vermont. After CDC She was on Faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and has continued to do work in International Disease Surveillance and Response and Epidemiology Training. She worked in Liberia for 2 years for the Ebola response with IRC and CSTE/CDC. Currently she teaches epidemiology with the University of New Hampshire and consults with the Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the Maine Medical Center. She helps co-found the Yarmouth Community Coronavirus Task Force in Yarmouth Maine.

  • Nicoleta Toma
    Nicoleta Toma, MD

Nicoleta Toma is board certified in Internal Medicine and worked as a hospitalist and primary care physician. In 2018 she enrolled in the Preventive Medicine fellowship at Maine Medical Center and as part of that program she completed her coursework for a master’s in public health degree at the University of New England. Through her MPH and Preventive Medicine Fellowship she has had the opportunity to increase her knowledge of descriptive and field epidemiology with projects in Population screening and COVID-19 response among vulnerable populations.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

We know that trauma can shape health in the near and long term. How can we mitigate the population mental health consequences of COVID-19?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and mental health
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, March 26, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour 
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131337 Event ID: 03262020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills 
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Coronavirus Seminar Series by BUSPH

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores population mental health in the context of COVID-19. We know that the pandemic is an extreme stressor, and has multiple characteristics that are toxic to mental health.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.

NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Name 4 characteristics that make the COVID-19 pandemic toxic to mental health
  • Describe 2 examples of negative mental health impact from past pandemics
  • Describe 5 characteristics of a concerted mental health effort during and following the pandemic
  • Name 5 empirically-supported elements that are help people adapt in ongoing threat situations

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


  • Karestan Koenen, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

  • Karestan C. Koenen, PhD aims to reduce the population burden of mental disorders through research, training, and advocacy. She is passionate about using science to overcome violence and trauma, which are major preventable causes of health problems globally.
    Dr. Koenen’s research focus is three-fold. First, she studies why some people develop PTSD and related mental and physical health problems and why some people are resilient when exposed to similar traumatic events. Dr. Koenen is a co-principal investigator on the NIMH-funded AURORA study, led by Dr. Samuel McLean with Drs. Ronald Kessler and Kerry Ressler. Dr. Koenen also co-leads the PTSD working group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, which aims to identify genetic variants that increase risk and resilience following trauma exposure. Second, she investigates how violence, trauma, and PTSD alter long-term physical health and accelerate aging. Much of this work is done in collaboration with the Nurses’ Health Study. Third, she aims to expand access to evidence-based mental health treatment for survivors of violence and trauma. To this end, she co-wrote the book, Treating Survivors of Childhood Abuse: Psychotherapy for the Interrupted Life with Drs. Marylene Cloitre and Lisa Cohen.
    Dr. Koenen leads the NIMH-funded Training Program in Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics (T32) and the Interdisciplinary Concentration in Population Mental Health. She also advises masters and doctoral degree students in the Departments of Epidemiology and Social Behavioral Sciences. In addition, Dr. Koenen leads the Trauma Epidemiology and Population Mental Health Research Group for her students and post-doctoral fellows. The group is primarily a forum for trainees and junior investigators to present and receive feedback on work-in-progress, but also includes presentations on advanced research methodology and career development.
    Dr. Koenen advocates for survivors of violence and trauma. In May 2011, Dr. Koenen testified before the House Foreign Affairs Full Committee about the epidemic of sexual violence and victim blaming culture of the Peace Corps. She has written for the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, and the Women’s Media Center’s Women Under Siege Project, which investigates how rape and other forms of sexualized violence are used as tools in conflict. Dr. Koenen also consulted on the documentary, It Happened Here, which examined the epidemic of sexual assault on university campuses. In addition, Dr. Koenen speaks to lay audiences about the latest scientific findings around violence and trauma.


  • Sarah Lowe, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Yale School of Public Health

  • Sarah Lowe, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Yale School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the long-term mental health consequences of a range of potentially traumatic events, as well as the impact of such events on other domains of functioning, such as physical health, social relationships, and economic wellbeing. Her work explores the mechanisms leading from trauma exposure to symptoms, and the role of factors at various ecological levels—from genetics to neighborhoods—in shaping risk and resilience. She uses a range of methodologies to achieve her research aims, including structural equation modeling, latent growth curve analysis, geospatial modeling, and qualitative analysis, among others. Dr. Lowe received her Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Boston and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She previously held an appointment in the Department of Psychology at Montclair State University, where she played a key role in developing the department’s first doctoral program.


  • Patricia Watson, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Psychiatry
    Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • Patricia Watson, PhD is a senior educational specialist for the National Center for PTSD and assistant professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, in the Department of Psychiatry. She is co-author of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Guide and the Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) Manual, produced by the National Center for PTSD and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. She is also a co-author of the Combat Operational Stress First Aid (COSFA) Field Guide, produced by the Department of Defense, the Defense Centers for Excellence, and the National Center for PTSD, and the Stress First Aid and Curbside Manner manuals for fire and rescue personnel, produced by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. She has additionally co-edited three books on disaster behavioral health interventions, numerous articles on resilience and early intervention, SAMHSA guidance documents, and articles and chapters on disaster mental health, resilience, combat and operational stress, and pandemic flu.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Detecting Outbreaks and Beginning Outbreak Investigation

What are the most common ways outbreaks are detected? Explore real world examples - Ebola and COVID-19 - for detecting disease outbreaks.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: June 1, 2020
    2:00 - 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_06082020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

What are the most common ways outbreaks are detected and what are the hopes for improvements? We will look at different data sources and systems (including human relationships) that are used to detect outbreaks. The emphasis on emerging infectious diseases and pandemic preparedness has led to changes in international health regulations at the highest levels, as well as requirements for disease detection at community levels. We will describe the ideal systems and some of the challenges; initial steps in outbreak investigation and use examples from Ebola in West and Central Africa and COVID in 2020.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define an outbreak.
  • Name 3 key sources of information from the community to assist outbreak detection.
  • Describe Community Event Based surveillance (CEBS) and how it fits into more formal disease surveillance and the International Health Regulations.
  • Given a scenario, decide if further investigation is warranted and when to investigate outbreaks.
  • Describe the investigative team.
  • Name the elements of a case definition.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Sharon McDonnell
    Sharon McDonnell, BSN, MD, MPH

Sharon received her BSN at the University of Florida and MD from the University of California, San Diego. After training in Family Medicine, she went to Pakistan/Afghanistan to work with NGOs and then WHO. She joined the US CDC as an EIS Officer and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health. She has worked in the state health departments in Florida and Vermont. After CDC She was on Faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and has continued to do work in International Disease Surveillance and Response and Epidemiology Training. She worked in Liberia for 2 years for the Ebola response with IRC and CSTE/CDC. Currently she teaches epidemiology with the University of New Hampshire and consults with the Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the Maine Medical Center. She helps co-found the Yarmouth Community Coronavirus Task Force in Yarmouth Maine.

  • Nicoleta Toma
    Nicoleta Toma, MD

Nicoleta Toma is board certified in Internal Medicine and worked as a hospitalist and primary care physician. In 2018 she enrolled in the Preventive Medicine fellowship at Maine Medical Center and as part of that program she completed her coursework for a master’s in public health degree at the University of New England. Through her MPH and Preventive Medicine Fellowship she has had the opportunity to increase her knowledge of descriptive and field epidemiology with projects in Population screening and COVID-19 response among vulnerable populations.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Using Available Data to Monitor Health and Detect Outbreaks

Who loves data? Everyone! Learn how to use data to monitor health status and detect problems, including disease outbreaks.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: May 28, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05252020.
    If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites None

About this Webinar

Following the previous presentation on surveillance we will dive into real systems and show how to access data to answer questions. Participants will practice accessing data to monitor health and detect health problems in the population. Participants, using computers, will use CDC WONDER and sentinel surveillance to assess health trends. We will discuss the newest data source-- medical records for public health.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Access existing morbidity and mortality datasets, including CDC WONDER and notifiable disease information.
  • Review sources of data, such as sentinel surveillance.
  • Describe how health records are being used for public health.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Gib Parrish
    Gib Parris, MD

Gib trained in laboratory medicine, pathology, and epidemiology and spent 20 years at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At the CDC, he worked on environmental health problems, improving mortality data, assisting state health departments with public health assessment activities, and improving national and state health information systems. After retiring from CDC, he has worked as a consultant on various population-health information-related projects, most recently on the Reportable Condition Knowledge Management system, which is identifying and evaluating potential cases of reportable conditions using data from electronic health records.

  • Sharon McDonnell
    Sharon McDonnell, BSN, MD, MPH

Sharon received her BSN at the University of Florida and MD from the University of California, San Diego. After training in Family Medicine, she went to Pakistan/Afghanistan to work with NGOs and then WHO. She joined the US CDC as an EIS Officer and is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Public Health. She has worked in the state health departments in Florida and Vermont. After CDC She was on Faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and has continued to do work in International Disease Surveillance and Response and Epidemiology Training. She worked in Liberia for 2 years for the Ebola response with IRC and CSTE/CDC. Currently she teaches epidemiology with the University of New Hampshire and consults with the Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency Program at the Maine Medical Center. She helps co-found the Yarmouth Community Coronavirus Task Force in Yarmouth Maine.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Infectious Disease Surveillance

Wondering how we track infectious diseases? COVID-19 has brought infectious disease surveillance to the forefront – learn about the surveillance systems being used in real-time to track the novel coronavirus.

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: May 21, 2020
    09:00 - 10:00 AM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05212020 If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites:None

About this Webinar

This webinar introduces public health surveillance concepts and principles, including various surveillance systems and how they are used in tracking diseases and other public health threats.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define public health surveillance.
  • Describe various methods for conducting infectious disease surveillance.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Jennifer Gunderman
    Jennifer Gunderman, MPH

Jennifer Gunderman, MPH, serves as the Director of the Maine Area Health Education Centers (AHEC), and is a member of the MPHA board of directors. She has a Master of Public Health in Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology from Emory University and is a DrPH candidate at the University of South Florida.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars

Public Health Systems: A Primer

Confused about what makes up the public system? Get your questions answered today!

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Course Information

  • Audience: Community health worker, public health professional, nurses, people working with populations requiring chronic care
  • Format: Online Webinar
  • Date/Time: May 12, 2020
    12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05122020. If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials: Session PowerPoint
  • Pre-requisites:None

About this Webinar

This webinar will cover the components of the public health system, including roles of government and non-governmental agencies, and differences in authorities and accountability across public health system entities. An overview of Maine’s unique public health system will be presented, and information about ways attendees can be involved will be provided.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the components of the public health system.
  • Discuss how the components of the public health system work together.
  • Describe differences in authority and accountability between governmental and non-governmental entities in the public health system.

Subject Matter Expert

  • Alfred May
    Alfred May, MPH

Alfred May, MPH, serves as the Maine CDC’s Downeast Public Health District Liaison. He has a Master of Public Health from the Yale School of Public Health.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Category: Webinars