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Category: Workshop

Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 2: How Do We Reduce the Risk of Another Pandemic and Also Prepare for Another?

How can we ensure that we prepare for the next pandemic by broadening the approach past the infectious disease scientists – i.e., by including political scientists, behavioral scientists, local public health practitioners, health educators, journalists, community leaders, etc?

   

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, April 8th, 2022
    12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1.5. Provider ID: SS1131137_PNP2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Preventing the Next Pandemic, Session 1: What Did We Get Right and What Did We get Wrong?
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

COVID-19 has readily made the point that the era of infectious diseases is far from over. And there are good reasons to think that with increasing urbanization and climate change, more large outbreaks and pandemics are in store. As we move away from an emergency response to dealing with the lasting impacts of COVID-19, it is critical that we learn the lessons around what we did well and what we did poorly and develop clear plans for preventing, where possible, and mitigating the impact of, when not, any future pandemic. Cohosted with the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Disease Policy and Research.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 6 key elements of preparedness for a future pandemic
  • Identify priorities to strengthen global clinical research capacities
  • Identify current World Health Organization (WHO) activities intended to enhance surveillance, testing capacity, and public health intelligence
  • Describe inequitable access to COVID vaccine and ideas to improve equitable access to medical countermeasures in future pandemics
  • Describe ideas to improve health care system resilience in the event of a pandemic
  • Discuss ideas to improve population-scale risk modeling, analytics, and forecasting
  • Describe characteristics of rural communities that make them particularly susceptible to effects of pandemics

Moderator

  • Matthew Fox

    Matthew Fox
    @PROFMATTFOX

    Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Matthew Fox, (SPH’02,’07) DSc, MPH, is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Global Health at Boston University. Dr. Fox joined Boston University in 2001. His research interests include treatment outcomes in HIV-treatment programs, infectious disease epidemiology (with specific interests in HIV and pneumonia), and epidemiologic methods. Dr. Fox works on ways to improve retention in HIV-care programs in South Africa from the time of testing HIV-positive through long-term treatment. As part of this work, he is involved in analyses to assess the impact of changes in South Africa’s National Treatment Guidelines for HIV. Dr. Fox also does research on quantitative bias analysis and co-authored a book on these methods, Applying Quantitative Bias Analysis to Epidemiologic Data (http://www.springer.com/public+health/book/978-0-387-87960-4). He is also the host of a public health journal club podcast called Free Associations designed to help people stay current in the public health literature and think critically about the quality of research studies (https://bit.ly/30fPApj) and a podcast on Epidemiologic Methods called SERious Epi (https://seriousepi.blubrry.net/). He currently teaches a third-level epidemiologic methods class, Advanced Epidemiology as well as two other doctoral level epidemiologic methods courses. Dr. Fox is a graduate of the Boston University School of Public Health with a master’s degree in epidemiology and biostatistics and a doctorate in epidemiology.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Krutika Kuppalli

      Krutika Kuppalli
      @KRUTIKAKUPPALLI

      Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations, Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention, Health Emergencies Program, World Health Organization


    • Krutika Kuppalli, MD, FIDSA is a Medical Officer for COVID-19 Health Operations in the Department of Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention in the Health Emergencies Program at the World Health Organization. She completed her Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Diseases fellowship at Emory University, a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego and was an Emerging Leader in Biosecurity Fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Dr. Kuppalli currently serves on the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Trainee Committee and is the Chair of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Global Health Committee. Dr. Kuppalli was previously a Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellow and conducted research in Southern India to understand barriers to care and how emerging infections impacted individuals living with HIV/AIDS. She was the medical director of a large Ebola Treatment Unit in Sierra Leone during the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, helped lead the development and implementation of pandemic response preparedness activities in resource limited settings, and has consulted on the development of therapeutics for emerging pathogens. Her clinical and research interests focus on health systems strengthening in resource limited settings, research and clinical care for emerging infections, outbreak preparedness and response, and policy. She has worked in Ethiopia, India, Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Haiti.


    • Jeffrey Shaman
      Jeffrey Shaman

      Professor,
      Department of Environmental
      Health Sciences,
      Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


    • Jeffrey Shaman is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Director of the Climate and Health Program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. He studies the survival, transmission and ecology of infectious agents, including the effects of meteorological and hydrological conditions on these processes. Work-to-date has primarily focused on mosquito-borne and respiratory pathogens. He uses mathematical and statistical models to describe, understand, and forecast the transmission dynamics of these disease systems, and to investigate the broader effects of climate and weather on human health.

    • Megan Ranney

      Megan Ranney
      @MEGANRANNEY

      Professor of
      Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical
      School; Academic Dean, School of Public
      Health, Brown University


    • Dr. Ranney is an emergency physician, researcher, and national advocate for innovative approaches to public health. She holds the Warren Alpert Endowed Professor of Emergency Medicine at Alpert Medical School of Brown University and is Founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health. She is also the Academic Dean at the School of Public Health at Brown University. Dr. Ranney’s research focus is on developing, testing, and disseminating digital health interventions to prevent violence and mental illness. She has had continuous external funding from federal and foundation grants for over a decade, with over 130 peer-reviewed publications. She serves multiple national leadership roles, including co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor for AFFIRM at the Aspen Institute (http://www.affirmresearch.org), a non-profit committed to ending the gun violence epidemic through a non-partisan public health approach, and President of the Board of GetUsPPE.org, a start-up non-profit that delivered donated personal protective equipment to those who needed it most. She is a Fellow of the fifth class of the Aspen Institute’s Health Innovators Fellowship Program and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network. She has received numerous awards for technology innovation, public health, and research, including Rhode Island “Woman of the Year” and the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Policy Pioneer Award. She is also a frequent media commentator on outlets ranging from the BBC to CNN to the New York Times. Dr. Ranney earned her bachelor’s degree in History of Science, graduating summa cum laude, from Harvard University; her medical doctorate, graduating Alpha Omega Alpha, from Columbia University; and her master’s in public health from Brown University. She completed her residency in Emergency Medicine and a fellowship in Injury Prevention Research at Brown University. She was previously a Peace Corps Volunteer in Cote d’Ivoire. She lives in Rhode Island with her husband and two children.

    • Tara Smith

      Tara Smith
      @AETIOLOGY

      Professor of Epidemiology, Kent State University

    • Dr. Smith’s research generally focuses on zoonotic infections (infections which are transferred between animals and humans). She has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, focusing on the epidemiology and transmission of livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus and science communication. She has received over $3 million in funding from AHRQ, USDA, and NIOSH to carry out these studies. She has presented her research at numerous national and international platforms, including talks on Capitol Hill on the topic of agriculture and antibiotic resistance. Her work has been profiled in many major publications, including Science, Nature, and The New York Times, as well as in “Superbug: the Fatal Menace of MRSA” by Maryn McKenna and “Pig Tales: an Omnivore’s Quest for Sustainable Meat” by Barry Estabrook. Dr. Smith is also very active in science communication and outreach. She has written books on Group A Streptococcus, Group B Streptococcus, and Ebola. She also co-edited “Ebola’s Message,” published in 2016 with MIT Press. She writes about infectious disease for many outlets, including Slate, the Washington Post, SELF magazine, Quanta, NBC News, and Foreign Affairs. She serves as a member of the advisory board of the Zombie Research Society. She lives in rural Ohio with her partner and children.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Challenging Public Health: Michelle Holder

How did COVID highlight and exacerbate economic and employment conditions disproportionately among women and persons of color? What can we learn to change those conditions as we move forward?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 5th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: TBD.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice, Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Our Challenging Public Health series invites speakers from outside of public health to reflect on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This conversation features Michelle Holder, President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. Holder’s research focuses primarily on how the US job market discriminates against people of color, particularly Black women, who not only face a gender wage gap but a racial wage gap. She has written extensively on this subject, including The ‘Double Gap’ and the Bottom Line: African American Women’s Wage Gap and Corporate Profits, and more recently The Early Impact of Covid-19 on Job losses among Black Women in the United States.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the public health system underperformed during COVID from policy and political perspectives
  • Discuss evidence for disparate effects of COVID on job loss and negative economic effects across gender, race, and class lines
  • Discuss lessons learned to improve public health response to combat more effectively the disparate outcomes of COVID along racial and ethnic lines

Moderator

  • Sandro Galea

    Sandro Galea
    @SANDROGALEA

    MODERATOR Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Rebecca Traister

      Michelle Holder
      @MLHOLDER999

      President of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth; Associate Professor of Economics, John Jay College, City University of New York
    • Michelle Holder is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth as well as Associate Professor of Economics at John Jay College, City University of New York. Prior to joining the John Jay College faculty, she worked as an applied economist for a decade in both the nonprofit and government sectors. Her research focuses on the Black community and women of color in the American labor market, and her economic policy reports have been covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Amsterdam News, El Diario, and Dollars & Sense magazine. Michelle has also appeared on, or been quoted in, media outlets such as CNN, the Washington Post, NPR, The New Yorker, Black News Channel (BNC), PBS, MSNBC, Al Jazeera-English, Marketplace, and Vox.com. Her second book, Afro-Latinos in the U.S. Economy, co-authored with Alan Aja, was released May 2021 by Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield. Michelle received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from The New School for Social Research, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Fordham University.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Annual Shine Lecture: Sheri Fink - Patient Rights in Emergencies: The Right to Treatment and the Right to Refuse Treatment.

Who should be part of the decision-making process for medical care allocation in an emergency? What is the appropriate role for the patients themselves? Who gets to make the final decision?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 13th, 2022 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_ASLPRE.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytic/Assessment Tools
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Boston University School of Public Health’s Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights presents the annual Cathy Shine lecture. The lectureship honors the memory of Cathy Shine and her dedication to the rights of all those in need of care. This year’s event will feature author and filmmaker Sherri Fink. Her best-selling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital focused on the tough choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is also the co-creator and executive producer of the Emmy-nominated documentary series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe common challenges to medical ethics and health equity
  • Discuss ethical framework for how to prioritize allocation of medical care in a crisis
  • Discuss the elements of a just decision-making process
  • Assess lessons learned from experience in 3 real-life cases (Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, COVID-19)

Moderator

  • George Annas

    George Annas
    @GEORGEJANNAS

     William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health


  • George J. Annas is William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University and Director of the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights at Boston University School of Public Health, and a member of the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at the School of Public Health. He is also a Professor at the School of Law and School of Medicine. He is author or editor of 20 books on health law and bioethics, including The Rights of Patients (3d ed 2004), Public Health Law (2d ed 2014), American Bioethics (2005), Worst Case Bioethics (2010), and Genomic Messages (2015). He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the co-founder of Global Lawyers & Physicians, a NGO dedicated to promoting health and human rights.

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Sheri Fink

      Sheri Fink
      @SHERIFINK

      Author, Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

    • Sheri Fink is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital about choices made in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She is a co-creator and an executive producer of the Emmy-nominated Netflix documentary television series Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak (2020), filmed the year prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. Fink contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the pandemic. Her and her colleagues’ stories on Ebola in West Africa were recognized with the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the George Polk Award for health reporting, and the Overseas Press Club Hal Boyle Award. Her story “The Deadly Choices at Memorial,” co-published by ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine, received a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and a National Magazine Award for reporting. Fink is an adjunct associate professor at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. A former relief worker in disaster and conflict zones, she received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her first book, War Hospital: A True Story of Surgery and Survival (PublicAffairs), is about medical professionals under siege during the genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Five Days at Memorial was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for nonfiction, the Ridenhour Book Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Book Award, the American Medical Writers Association Medical Book Award, and the NASW Science in Society Journalism Book Award.


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Course Information

  • Audience: Community health workers, public health professionals, social service providers, policymakers
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, May 24th 2022
    11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_05242022.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This webinar will describe the intersection between homelessness and housing and public health and health outcomes. It will discuss how housing is a social determinant of health and identify local solutions to ending homelessness.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe what homelessness looks like in Maine
  • Describe how homelessness intersects with health promotion and disease prevention
  • Identify 1-2 services and solutions to homelessness
  • Identify 1-2 ways Maine is approaching the design and delivery of homelessness services

This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar.

Subject Matter Experts

  • Lauren Bustard

    Lauren Bustard

  • Lauren Bustard is the Senior Director of Homeless Initiatives at MaineHousing. Prior to joining MaineHousing in 2012, she worked for many years in social service and education programs in Maine, and in refugee and international development programs in Latin America and Southeast Asia.

  • Courtney Pladsen

    Courtney Pladsen
    DNP, FNP-BC

  • Courtney Pladsen is the Clinical Director at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council where she leads national efforts to improve health care quality and access for people experiencing homelessness through quality improvement initiatives, technical assistance, research, policy/advocacy, and training. She is a current fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Leader program for her work at the intersection of health and housing. She works clinically providing medical, mental health, and substance use treatment to people who are experiencing homelessness at the FQHC Greater Portland Health in Portland, Maine.

  • Cullen Ryan

    Cullen Ryan

  • Cullen Ryan has a 35-year career serving homeless and special needs populations. A formerly licensed clinician (LICSW) with a BA from the University of Vermont and a MA in Counseling and Psychological Services from St. Mary’s University (Minnesota), Cullen has provided street outreach, case management, family therapy, and individual/group psychotherapy to homeless adults, families, and adolescents in a variety of clinical and non-clinical settings in three states. Since 2004, Cullen Ryan has served as Executive Director of Community Housing of Maine, the largest housing provider for homeless populations in the state. Cullen currently co-chairs or chairs several Boards and Coalitions, and he serves as President of the Board of Directors for the Maine CoC. Cullen was a past Chair of the Maine Affordable Housing Coalition, and recent Acting Chair of Maine’s Statewide Homeless Council, and actively serves on both. For more on Community Housing of Maine, go to www.chomhousing.org

  • Erin Healy

    Erin Healy

  • Erin Healy is a Strategy Lead for Large Scale Change at Built for Zero. Her work focuses on implementing the Built for Zero model on a statewide level. She has worked on issues related to the homeless sector for over fifteen years. Erin specializes in systems improvement, movement building, and helping collaborative teams set and achieve clear, measurable goals. After several years as an independent consultant, Erin re-joined the Community Solutions team in 2021. She was a member of CS’s 100,000 Home Campaign team (2012 – 2014) and helped launch Built for Zero in 2016. Erin holds a JD from the University of Washington School of Law and an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College.

  • Donna Kelley

    Donna Kelley
    MSW, LCSW

  • Donna Kelley is the President and CEO of Waldo Community Action Partners. She is Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Maine and joined WCAP in 2018. Prior to that she worked for Kennebec Behavioral Health for 19 years. Donna has been immersed in the community mental health and social services field for 32 years. She has worked to plan, develop, implement, and restructure mental health and community service programs and systems by working with local, regional, and statewide community-based organizations, groups, and governmental agencies to improved access and quality of services for consumers allowing for improved quality of life and greater self-sufficiency. Donna earned her undergraduate degree in Biology from the University of Maine, and her Master’s in Social Work from the University of New England in Biddeford.

  • Rich Hooks Wayman

    Rich Hooks Wayman

  • Rich Hooks Wayman serves as the President and CEO for Volunteers of America Northern New England (www.voanne.org), a nonprofit organization offering affordable housing, residential care and community based social services to communities in Maine and New Hampshire. Prior to his tenure at Volunteers of America, Richard served as the National Executive Director for the Children’s Defense Fund. Additionally, Richard was the CEO of a regional child welfare agency in Massachusetts, was the Executive Director of a statewide supportive housing program serving long term homeless persons in Minnesota, and conducted federal legislative advocacy and policy analysis for the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Richard attended the University of Iowa College of Law, graduating with a Juris Doctor in 1992, and the University of Iowa College of Law, graduating with a Juris Doctor in 1992. He is a member of the American Bar Association to has been appointed to the Commission on Homelessness and Poverty. Richard and his husband (Aaron) have six adoptive children.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Health Consequences of War

How can an understanding of the range of war’s effects on refugees allow public health and healthcare practitioners in the US to provide appropriate and effective care for wartime refugees in our communities?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 29th, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: TBD
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

As the war in Ukraine unfolds, the world is beginning to bear witness to the consequences being experienced by the Ukrainian people. This Conversation brings together experts who have studied other conflicts to discuss what we know about the long-term effects of war on the health of populations.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the effects of war on the mental health of children, youth, and families and types of interventions that have shown to be effective in addressing those effects
  • Describe the challenges to and lessons learned from providing nutritional support and medical care to persons in the Syrian conflict
  • Discuss the impact of violence on health care providers and facilities in Ukraine, as well as historical experience of prior conflicts (Afghanistan, sub-Saharan Africa)
  • Compare and contrast effects of conventional warfare (effects on battlefield relatively well understood) vs. “hybrid” warfare (effects on civilians and society; medical consequences unknown)

Moderator

  • Tiziana Dearing

    Tiziana Dearing
    @TIZIANA_DEARING

    Host, WBUR’s Radio Boston

  • Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston on WBUR. She’s been a commentator and contributor to WBUR for more than a decade, and has contributed to a number of other regional and national news outlets. Prior to joining the Radio Boston team, Tiziana was a professor at Boston College in the School of Social Work, where she taught social innovation and leadership. A longtime anti-poverty advocate, Tiziana also ran Boston Rising, a startup antipoverty fund to end generational poverty in Boston, and was the first woman president of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Boston. She’s won a number of awards in the city, including a Pinnacle Award from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Theresa Betancourt

      Theresa Betancourt

      Salem Professor
      in Global Practice,
      Boston College

    • Theresa S. Betancourt is the inaugural Salem Professor in Global Practice at the Boston College School of Social Work and Director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her primary research interest is to understand the protective processes that contribute to risk and resilience in the mental health and development of children and adolescents facing adversity in a variety of cultures and settings. Dr. Betancourt has led several initiatives to adapt and test evidence-based behavioral and parenting interventions for children, youth, and families facing adversity due to poverty, illness, and violence. Dr. Betancourt additionally focuses on strategies for scaling out these interventions using implementation science approaches. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Dr. Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence that can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in Rwanda. In the US, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. through the collaborative development and evaluation of parenting programs led by refugees for refugees that can be linked to prevention services involving refugee community health workers. Dr. Betancourt has served on the advisory board for the 2021 UNICEF State of the World’s Children report, titled, “On My Mind: Promoting, Protecting, and Caring for Children’s Mental health.” Additionally, she has advised Amnesty International on a key advocacy report on mental health in Sierra Leone entitled ““They are forgetting about us:” The Long-term mental health impact of war and Ebola in Sierra Leone.” Dr. Betancourt serves on a high-level World Health Organization Mental Health Gap Topic Expert Group (TEG), the Lancet Commission on Gender Based Violence and Maltreatment of Young People, as well as serve as a thematic advisor for the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) for a series of workshops on Violent Extremist Disengagement, Reconciliation, Trauma Recovery. Dr. Betancourt has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com, and in an interview with Larry King on the program, “PoliticKing.”

    • Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Abdulkarim Ekzayez

      Doctor & Research Associate, King's College, London

    • Dr. AbdulKarim Ekzayez is a Syrian medical doctor specializing in epidemiology and health systems. His current work at King’s College focuses on health systems strengthening in conflict areas and on building the research and policy capacity of the health sector in conflict-affected areas of the Middle East. He is currently a lead applicant for a large project funded by the National Institute for Health Research called “Research for Health System Strengthening in Northern Syria R4HSSS”. He is also involved in several other projects and research with other academic and policy institutes including LSHTM, AUB, Chatham House and others. His research focuses on issues related to health system building in conflict settings and early recovery, health care protection challenges, and the health impact of conflict. In 2013, Karim was training to be a neurosurgeon when his residency was interrupted by the war. He joined Save the Children in North West Syria, where he led the health response until 2017 – helping build the primary health care system, restarting routine vaccinations, and supporting the rebuilding of the health system in northern Syria using a bottom up approach. Dr. Ekzayez is a regular contributor to several medical and civil society institutions in Syria, and has been active in advocacy for Syria through media and conferences. He is a trustee member of two NGOs, Shafak and Refugee Trauma Initiative and a managing director of the Syrian British Council which is a lobbying and advocacy body in the UK. He received his MD from Aleppo University and his MSc from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Also, he completed a one-year residential fellowship on leadership in international affairs from The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs at Chatham House; and another one-year fellowship in international cultural relations from the Institute for International Cultural Relations at The University of Edinburgh. He is also pursuing his PhD in public policy from King’s College London.

    • Larissa Fast

      Larissa Fast

      Doctor, Humanitarian and Conflict Studies, University of Manchester

    • Professor Fast is working at the intersection of the worlds of academia, policy, and practice. Her research addresses two fundamental problems: how best to protect civilians, particularly those who intervene in violent conflict, and how to make such intervention more effective, ethical, and responsive to local needs and circumstances. In addition to her book Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism, she has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and policy reports. Professor Fast worked for both government and non-government agencies as a project manager, consultant, and analyst, and provided training to individuals and organizations in peace building and conflict analysis. Prior to her current position at Manchester, she was a Senior Research Fellow at ODI’s Humanitarian Policy Group, a Fulbright-Schuman Research Scholar (2016-2017), and a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow (2014-2016) at USAID’s Global Development Lab. She has also held faculty positions at the Kroc Institute at the University of Notre Dame (USA) and Conrad Grebel University College (University of Waterloo, Canada).

    • Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Amir Khorram-Manesh

      Doctor & Senior University Lecturer, University of Gothenburg

    • Dr. Khorram-Manesh serves as university lecturer in surgery with particular focus on disaster medicine, mass casualty management and trauma. He is also a Visiting professor at numerous universities, currently the National Institute of Emergency Medicine of Thailand and Mahidol University in Bangkok. He has published over 100 papers, book chapters and books. His current research interests are in multiagency collaboration in emergencies, introduction of the Flexible Surge Capacity concept, Civilian-Military collaboration and its related challenges, development of emergency medicine in middle and low-income countries, hospital safety in disasters and public health emergencies. He is equally active in introduction of educational initiatives such as simulation trainings and exercises within the field of disaster and emergency medicine.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Travel Restrictions During Pandemics: Considerations and Consequences

Have the benefits of implementing cross-border travel bans aimed at containing the spread of disease outweighed the potential adverse effects on limiting the availability of health workers, the increase of xenophobia, and use based on political motivations rather than potential for improving public health?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, March 1st, 2022
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID:  SS1131137_TRDPCC.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Cross-border travel bans have long been controversial in public health. While travel bans may help contain disease spread, there are also concerns that they may limit the availability of health workers where needed, and that they may encourage xenophobia. During the COVID-19 pandemic, travel bans were implemented widely by many countries (U.S. included), in an effort to contain the virus and control its spread. But how effective were they in suppressing the spread? Is it fair to look at the effectiveness of these bans without considering if they do more harm than good? Dr. William J. Bicknell endowed this lectureship to support excellence, rigor, imagination and risk-taking in the teaching and practice of public health through annual lectures.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the legal right to restrict travel in the United States and its potential for misuse
  • Describe the legal framework and principles that can provide structure for decision making about international travel restrictions in times of uncertainty
  • Discuss the evidence for the effectiveness of travel restrictions in decreasing the transmission of disease and reducing risk
  • Discuss the evidence for the role of COVID testing and vaccines in travel restrictions
  • Describe lessons learned about quarantine, isolation, and travel restrictions from the historical example of yellow fever

Moderator

  • Sharmila Devi

    Sharmila Devi
    @SHARMILADEVI2

    Writer and Editor

  • Sharmila Devi is a writer and editor with more than 25 years’ experience working for international agencies, newspapers and consultancies. She was a correspondent in the Middle East and Africa, including more than five years as the Jerusalem correspondent for the Financial Times during the second intifada, and has reported developments in politics, economics, global health and climate change. She also worked in New York as correspondent for the UAE-based National newspaper and in Iraqi Kurdistan as a correspondent for the English-language service of the local media network Rudaw during the conflict with ISIS. She writes and edits major reports for NGOs such as Unicef and for political risk consultancies about politics and global health. She is a long-standing contributor to the world report pages of The Lancet, writing about global health issues, conflict and humanitarian crises. She covered the COVID-19’s impact around the world, including how travel restrictions hampered the global response to the pandemic.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Sondra Crosby

      Sondra Crosby
      @SONDRACROSBY16

      Associate Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health

    • Sondra Crosby, MD is a medical doctor and Professor of Medicine at Boston University, specializing in internal medicine. She is also a faculty member of the Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights department at the Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Crosby is notable for being one of the first doctors allowed to travel to Guantanamo to independently examine Guantanamo captives. She is also notable for serving as the director of medical care at the Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights. She examined over 300 torture victims at the Center. Dr. Crosby is one of the authors of Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by the US, published by Physicians for Human Rights. According to Physicians for Human Rights, Dr. Crosby has “written over 200 affidavits documenting medical and psychological sequelae of torture.”

    • Eskild Petersen

      Eskild Petersen
      @AARHUSUNI_INT

      Professor Emeritus, Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark

    • Professor Eskild Petersen is a Professor Emeritus of Infectious Diseases, Institute for Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Science, Aarhus University, Denmark. He chairs the ESCMID Emerging Infections Task Force, Basel, Switzerland. Professor Petersen is internationally renowned for his extensive contributions to global health, therapeutic drug monitoring, multi-drug resistant infections, implant associated infections, travel medicine and emerging infections. Professor Petersen graduated in 1978 from Medical School, University of Aarhus, Denmark; 1980 Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, University of Liverpool; 1985 Specialist Degree in Infectious Diseases; 1988 Specialist Degree in Tropical Medicine; 2002 Master of Business Administration, Copenhagen Business School; 2005 DMSc., Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. He served six years on the board of the ESCMID Study Group on Migration and Travel Medicine, lecturing on immunizations in pregnancy on several ESCMID workshops. Professor Petersen retired from clinical service in June 2020. He is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Infectious Diseases since 2012. Associate editor of Travel Medicine and Infectious Diseases. 2010-2018, on the Editorial board of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, American Association of Clinical Microbiology. 2011–2012 Editorial board, Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. 2011 – 2012. 1999 – Co-Editor (Moderator) on parasitic diseases. ProMED (www.promedmail.org). Professor Petersen has published over 350 original papers in peer reviewed journals with an H-index of 53. He has edited several textbooks, including the popular textbooks “Infectious Disease: a Geographic Guide”.

    • Barbara Von Tigerstrom

      Barbara Von Tigerstrom
      @USASKLAW

      Professor, College of Law, University of Saskatchewan

    • Barbara von Tigerstrom is a Professor at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, where she has been a member of faculty since 2005, after working at the University of Alberta Health Law Institute and the University of Canterbury School of Law. She holds a law degree from the University of Toronto and Ph.D. in law from the University of Cambridge. She has received several awards for excellence in teaching and research, and research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Stem Cell Network, among others. Dr. von Tigerstrom’s main areas of teaching and research are health law and policy, information and privacy law, and tort law. Her work in public health examines domestic and international legal issues relating to both infectious and non-communicable diseases. Since March 2020 she has been engaged in a research project funded by the CIHR on the International Health Regulations (IHR) and COVID-19 (with Principal Investigator Dr. Kumanan Wilson and others), with her work focusing on travel restrictions and the IHR. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. von Tigerstrom contributes her expertise to University and external committees including the University of Saskatchewan Biomedical Research Ethics Board and the Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan.

    • Samantha Vanderslott

      Samantha Vanderslott
      @SJVANDERS
      University Research Lecturer at Oxford Vaccine Group, University of Oxford

    • Samantha Vanderslott is a University Research Lecturer at the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford working on health, society, and policy topics. Her current projects are about: policies for neglected tropical diseases; outbreak response; a history of typhoid fever; and attitudes to vaccines. She draws on perspectives from sociology, anthropology, history, global health, and science and technology studies (STS).

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Health care in the big city during COVID-19

How do we translate lessons learned from the pandemic about social and health inequities in creating a better “new normal” in healthcare?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Friday, February 25th, 2022 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HCBCDC19.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

February 1 marked the two-year anniversary of Boston’s first confirmed COVID-19 case. Since then, the pandemic has changed the way health care is delivered throughout the city and new issues continue to emerge (e.g., employee burnout, supply shortages) that challenge the sustainability of our hospitals. In this conversation, we will hear from the presidents of two of Boston’s health systems for a conversation about lessons learned, current issues, and the forging a sustainable path forward.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss lessons learned about the impact of the COVID pandemic on hospitals and health care systems
  • Describe the behavioral and mental health effects of the pandemic observed in pediatric patients at a major metropolitan children’s hospital and ramifications going forward
  • Discuss the projected future of telehealth driven by the pandemic but now an important part of the healthcare delivery model
  • Discuss the importance of the hospital in community engagement to increase vaccination rates and to address health disparities

Moderator

  • Chris Louis

    Chris Louis
    @CHRISLOUIS628

    Clinical Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Chris Louis, PhD, MHA is Clinical Associate Professor of Health Law, Policy, and Management at the Boston University School of Public Health. He is also the Director of the Health Care Management Program and the Director of BUSPH Dual Degree Programs (JD/MPH, MD/MPH, MS/MPH, MSW/MPH, MBA/MPH). His primary research interests reside in health care organization and delivery, Medicaid innovation programs, cancer care, children with medical complexity, and large-scale program evaluation. He is currently a Principal Investigator on multiple state, federal, and private program evaluations and research grants. These projects include an American Cancer Society grant focused on understanding breast cancer screening practices in the Appalachian region, an evaluation of the current Arkansas Section 1115 Medicaid waiver, and an evaluation of a HRSA-funded grant seeking to improve care for children with medical complexity. He has published recently on breast cancer care delivery, Medicaid reform, and accountable care in journals such as the Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law, Health Care Management Review, and the American Journal of Accountable Care. Dr. Louis has nearly a decade of health care industry experience in strategy, operations, and project management. Dr. Louis’ past experience includes serving as a consultant and hospital administrator in CT, FL and NJ. Dr. Louis earned his PhD from Penn State University in Health Policy & Administration. He also holds a Master of Health Administration (MHA) from the University of Florida and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Sacred Heart University.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Kevin Churchwell

      Kevin Churchwell
      @BOSTONCHILDRENS

      President and Chief Executive Officer, Boston Children's Hospital

    • Kevin B. Churchwell, MD, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Boston Children’s Hospital, providing leadership, vision, and oversight for a team that’s dedicated to improving and advancing child health through their life-changing work in clinical care, research and innovation, medical education, and community engagement. Since joining Boston Children’s as its Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Chief Operating Officer in 2013, Dr. Churchwell has been instrumental in leading the hospital’s work to become a High Reliability Organization, one where zero avoidable harm impacts any patient, family member, or employee. He has brought to Boston the same passion for enhancing the patient family experience that defined his tenure as CEO of both Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, and Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, part of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. An advocate for equity, diversity and inclusivity, Dr. Churchwell is responsible for establishing three of the 11 Offices of Health Equity and Inclusion at hospitals across the U.S. and Canada, including the Office at Boston Children’s, which he founded in 2016. With the publication of Boston Children’s own Declaration for Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity in 2020, Dr. Churchwell has committed to the work required to make Boston Children’s a community that’s made stronger by our differences, and a leader in equity for all. A graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, Dr. Churchwell completed his pediatric residency and a clinical fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care at Boston Children’s Hospital. He is currently an Associate Professor of Pediatric Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Dr. Churchwell is the Robert and Dana Smith Associate Professor of Anesthesia at the Harvard Medical School. Disclosures: Dr. Churchwell is a member of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, a board member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Whitehead Institute, Advisory Board for The Boston University School of Public Health, and the Boys and Girls Club of Boston.

    • Kate Walsh

      Kate Walsh
      @KATEWALSHCEO

      President and Chief Executive Officer, Boston Medical Center

    • Kate Walsh is president and CEO of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) health system, with annual operating revenue of $4.9 billion. BMC is a private, not-for-profit, 514 bed, academic medical center dedicated to meeting all the needs of its patients, needs that often transcend the scope of traditional medicine like food and housing insecurity, and advancing health equity within the communities it serves. The primary teaching affiliate of Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center has nearly 6000 employees and 755 physicians who are affiliated with Boston University Medical Group. BMC Health System also includes the BMC HealthNet Plan, a Medicaid Managed Care Organization with more than 400,000 members in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and Boston HealthNet, a network affiliation of 14 community health centers throughout Boston. Prior to her appointment at Boston Medical Center, Ms. Walsh served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She served previously as the chief operating officer for Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and at Massachusetts General Hospital in positions including senior vice president of medical services and the MGH Cancer Center. Prior to her tenure at Mass General, she held positions in a number of New York City hospitals including Montefiore, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Saint Luke’s – Roosevelt Hospital Center and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Ms. Walsh received her bachelor of arts degree and a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. She has served as a member of the Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and currently serves on the Boston Public Health Commission, the Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, Pine Street Inn, and Yale University.

        Registration

        Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

        Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II

How can public health practitioners work with community partners to address underlying causes (social determinants) of trauma in their community?

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Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 1:15 PM – 2:45 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC2.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how trauma (interpersonal, collective, cultural, and experience of loss) can be seen as a social determinant of health
  • Explain race and racism as a risk factor for trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Describe prevalence and predictors of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among youth based on results of Maryland Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  • Discuss non-uniform policing practices as a contributor for trauma as a social determinant of health

Moderator

  • Jaimie Gradus

    Jaimie Gradus
    @JAIMIEGRADUS

    MODERATOR Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus’s research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Maryam Jernigan-Noesi

      Maryam Jernigan-Noesi
      @JERNIGMA

      Founder, Jernigan & Associates Psychology and Educational Consulting

    • Addressing the needs of diverse youths, adults, and families has been the primary focus of Dr. Jernigan-Noesi’s work as a clinician and scholar. She recognizes that not all traditional psychological approaches that serve to meet the needs of some, are effective for persons from all backgrounds. Dr. Jernigan-Noesi prides herself on the integration of context, culture, and social factors that may influence health and wellbeing. Clinically, Dr. Jernigan-Noesi has worked alongside a multidisciplinary team of health providers in inpatient and outpatient mental health, community, medical, and academic settings. She has extensive training in pediatric psychology and adolescent health, as well as specialized training in adult and family interventions. Dr. Jernigan maintains a private practice serving a diverse clientele with a range of clinical concerns including, but not limited to: treatment of eating and weight concerns, mood disorders, anxiety, trauma, grief and loss, relational concerns, and career coaching. She also provides couple counseling focused on major life transitions such as, marriage and parenting. Her approach to therapy utilizes an intersectional framework emphasizing the role of identity (e.g., racial identity, sexual identity, gender identity) and culture in mental health and wellbeing.

    • Renee Johnson

      Renee Johnson
      @RENEE_M_JOHNSON

      Associate Professor,
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    • Dr. Renee M. Johnson is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned her MPH and PhD at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and conducted post-doctoral studies at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. At Hopkins, she is core faculty with the Center for Adolescent Health and the Center for Injury Research & Policy. Dr. Johnson has more than 100 publications addressing adolescent health, and is on the editorial board for JAMA Pediatrics. Her areas of expertise include: substance use among adolescents and emerging adults; violence and injury prevention; and evaluating the public health response to the overdose crisis. Much of her work addresses how adversity and social inequity shape behavioral health. She works with behavioral surveillance data (e.g., CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey, SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use & Health), as well as with morbidity and mortality data (e.g., State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System, or SUDORS). Dr. Johnson is deeply engaged in training the next generation of public health professionals. She teaches a course on substance use epidemiology and directs a NIDA-funded training program for doctoral and post-doctoral students studying the epidemiology of substance use.

    • Emily Mendenhall

      Emily Mendenhall
      @MENDENHALL_EM

      Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

    • Emily Mendenhall, PhD, MPH is a medical anthropologist and Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She has published widely at the boundaries of anthropology, psychology, medicine, and public health and is the inaugural co-editor-in-chief of Social Science and Medicine—Mental Health. Dr. Mendenhall led a Series of articles in on Syndemics in The Lancet in 2017, and was awarded the George Foster Award for Practicing Medical Anthropology by the Society for Medical Anthropology. She has published several books, including Rethinking Diabetes: Entanglements with Trauma, Poverty, and HIV (2019), Syndemic Suffering: Social Distress, Depression, and Diabetes among Mexican Immigrant Women (2012), and Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives (2015). Her newest book is Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji.

    • John Pamplin

      John Pamplin

      @JOHNPAMPLINII

      Assistant Professor
      and Faculty Fellow,
      New York
      University

    • John R. Pamplin II is an “Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow” in the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress and with the Center for Opioid Epidemiology and Policy at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Dr. Pamplin’s research studies the consequences of structural racism and systemic inequity on mental health and substance use outcomes. His program of research includes work identifying the social and structural drivers of racial patterns in DSM diagnosed major depression, as well as work evaluating policy interventions for the opioid crisis in terms of their potential to either alleviate of exacerbate racial inequities in overdose and criminal legal system outcomes. Prior to joining NYU, Dr. Pamplin received his PhD in Epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public health, where he was a predoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology’s National Institute of Mental Health-funded Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program. Upon graduation, Dr. Pamplin received the Bill Jenkins Award (formerly the William Farr Award) for commitment to addressing the causes of social inequalities in health and promise in the field of Epidemiology. Dr. Pamplin also holds an MPH in Epidemiology from Columbia University, as well as a BS in Biology from Morehouse College, and currently serves as President of the Student and Postdoc Committee of the Society for Epidemiologic Research.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session I

What are some opportunities for public health practitioners to contribute to the prevention of trauma and its after-effects in the community?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo NCHEC CHES Logo    

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Monday, February 14th, 2022 10:30 PM – 12:00 PM EST
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.5 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MHTCC1.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Mental Health and Trauma: Context and Consequences, Session II
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This program will examine trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and their effect on our physical and mental health and how our social and economic context influences this relation. How do racial, social, and economic inequities influence the consequences of PTSD? And is our health care system equipped to address the societal burden of mental and physical health due to trauma?


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific types of primary, secondary, and tertiary systemic or community-wide prevention strategies for trauma
  • Discuss the impact of racism, in terms of policies and practices, microaggressions, and other types of discriminatory behaviors, resulting in “racial trauma”
  • Describe the complicated relationship between traumatic brain injury and opioid use disorder
  • List 9 physical health conditions shown to be associated with experiencing trauma
  • Discuss the link between trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and cardiovascular disease in women

Moderator

  • Paula Schnurr

    Paula Schnurr
    @VA_PTSD_INFO

    MODERATOR Executive Director, National Center for PTSD and Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine

  • Subject Matter Experts

    • Rachel Sayko Adams

      Rachel Sayko Adams
      @RSAYKO_ADAMS

      Senior Scientist,
      Inst. for Behavioral Health, Heller School for Social Policy Management
      Brandeis University

    • Rachel Sayko Adams, PhD, MPH is a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health at the Heller School for Social Policy & Management at Brandeis University and a proud alum of Boston University’s School of Public Health where she completed her Master’s in Public Health. She is a health services researcher with expertise examining co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions following traumatic brain injury in military/Veteran and civilian populations, with a particular focus on at-risk alcohol use and prescription opioid use. Dr. Adams is the Co-PI of the INROADS study at Brandeis, Intersecting Research on Opioid Misuse, Addiction, and Disability Services, which is examining the intersection between addiction, disability, and service provision in an effort to address the rise of opioid use disorders among people with disabilities, funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. She is a MPI of an R01 from the National Institute of Mental Health which is integrating data from the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration to enhance suicide prevention efforts for military members returning from deployments using machine learning. Dr. Adams has an appointment as a health services researcher with the Veterans Health Administration Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center in Aurora, Colorado.

    • Jennifer Sumner

      Jennifer Sumner
      @SUMNERSTRESSLAB

      Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology,
      University of California, Los Angeles

    • Dr. Jennifer Sumner is a clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is the Director of the Sumner Stress Lab at UCLA, and her program of research lies at the intersection of the psychological and physical health consequences of trauma exposure. The work of the Sumner Stress Lab examines how experiences of trauma and severe stress relate to accelerated aging and risk for chronic disease, with a particular focus on cardiovascular disease—the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The goal of this research is to delineate the pathways by which trauma and severe stress get embedded under the skin to contribute to poor health and to use this information to develop targeted interventions to offset risk for adverse health outcomes after trauma. Dr. Sumner received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Pomona College and her Masters and PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship program at the Charleston Consortium (Traumatic Stress Track) and received postdoctoral training as an Epidemiology Merit Fellow at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Prior to joining UCLA, Dr. Sumner was an Assistant Professor of Behavioral Medicine at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Medical Center.

    • Juliette McClendon

      Juliette McClendon
      @WEAREBIGHEALTH

      Director of Medical
      Affairs,
      Big Health
    • Kathryn Magruder

      Kathryn Magruder
      @MUSCHEALTH

      Professor, Medical University of South Carolina


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Category: Webinars

The Maliseet Food Sovereignty Initiative: Partnership to Promote Food Sovereignty and Food Security

What are some tangible strategies for implementing food sovereignty, and nutrition, at the community level and how might the program coordinate with community thoughts on traditional food issues?

 MPHA Maine Public Health Association Logo NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health Professionals, Community Health Workers
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, October 12th 2021 9:40 AM – 10:10 AM EST.
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 30 minutes
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_MFSI
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials:None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Webinar

The concept of food sovereignty has developed within Indigenous communities and is broadly applicable. It offers a framework for working toward a greater degree of local autonomy over food production and food access, alleviating food insecurity, and fostering a culture of environmental justice. While food sovereignty has received increased attention in recent years, the focused has largely been on developing a conceptual framework emphasizing local, Indigenous control over food production and distribution in Tribal communities. Less information has been disseminated on practical strategies for implementing food sovereignty initiatives in real-world settings. The Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians (HBMI) has launched a food sovereignty initiative with the aims of increasing access to nutritious food, improving food security, and strengthening connections to Wabanaki culture through the sharing of traditional approaches to food production, storage, and preparation - including planting edible landscapes, Three Sisters, and sacred medicines. Lessons learned are adding to current knowledge about how to develop, implement, and evaluate a model that is rooted in the principals of food sovereignty and designed to increase access to nutritious food, food security, and connection to traditional culture.

The Initiative is implementing coordinated, culturally-connected strategies including establishing community gardens available to youth, Elders, and over 309 individual households throughout Maliseet territory, as well as foster-children in non-Native households - this represents a reach to over 700 individuals. Youth interns have been engaged in program management, training, and evaluation activities. Opportunities to learn and share knowledge about traditional storage and recipes are being provided to community members. Existing partnerships are being leveraged to develop a sustainable model. Evaluation processes are collecting input from the community to understand the overall impact. Household gardens are being installed for each Tribal housing unit. Additional community gardens will enable food production capacity to increase over the coming years.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the concepts of food sovereignty, food security, and environmental justice
  • Describe the main programmatic aspects of the Maliseet Food Sovereignty Initiative
  • Discuss strategies for implementing and evaluating a community-based food sovereignty initiative

Subject Matter Experts

Chief Clarissa Sabattis, Houlton Band of Maliseets

Clarissa is a citizen and current elected Chief of the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians and has served 7 years as councilor and chief. She is deeply rooted in her community’s culture and traditions. Her work has been dedicated to improving the overall health and wellbeing of the Maliseet Nation. Since holding the position of chief, her priorities have included economic development, youth engagement, food sovereignty and strengthening the Maliseet’s overall infrastructure to better meet the needs of the tribe’s citizens. Her efforts at the Maine Legislature to gain rights for the HBMI have been at the forefront of her first four years in office. Prior to her role as Tribal Chief, Clarissa spent nearly a decade working as part of a team establishing and growing the Tribal Public Health Infrastructure for the Wabanaki Tribes in Maine. She has held multiple leadership roles in health care, and tribal public health which have positioned her to be a strong advocate in these areas.


Andrew Pritchard, MPH Lead Program Evaluator, PHRI Consulting

Andrew is an experienced public health professional whose work has focused on program evaluation, research design, data collection and analysis, and project planning and implementation. Andrew’s areas of expertise include issues in rural and minority health, population health, and social determinants of health. His research and evaluation approach is rooted in the principals of Community Based Participatory Research. He has assisted local and state-wide efforts to improve population health and bridge gaps between health care, education, and social service sectors in the following ways:

  • Developing data collection strategies, including using a variety of web-based survey tools, conducting focus groups and key informant interviews, and developing data use agreements to access medical and educational data for program participants
  • Conducting data analysis, including work with small datasets collected locally, large national survey datasets, and qualitative data collected through interviews and other processes
  • Working with stakeholders and managing project teams in a variety of settings – including academic, governmental, community, and health services – to establish specific, measurable objectives and a clear, shared definition of what success looks like
  • Developing study protocols and leading trainings on research compliance guidelines and processes (including IRB, HIPAA and FERPA) for medical students, principal investigators, and new staff
  • Presenting findings in academic and professional workshops and conferences, as well as non-academic stakeholder groups – including patients, community leaders, and senior health system leaders – to inform decision-making<.li>
  • Overseeing grant development efforts, including developing budgets and evaluation strategies for successful grant proposals
  • Use of industry standard software and data-analysis tools, including SPSS, R, Excel, Access, STATA, NVivo, and REDCap for data collection and analysis
  • Andrew received his Master of Public Health degree from the University of Michigan School of Public Health in 2009


    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    Health and Social Equity in Indigenous Communities in Maine

    How will we respond to the uncomfortable truths about the underlying inequity faced by tribal nations of Maine? How can we heal from that history together?

     MPHA Maine Public Health Association Logo NCHEC CHES Logo

    Register

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals, Community Health Workers
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Tuesday, October 12th 2021 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM EST.
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1 hour
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HSEICM 
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Cultural Competency Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Webinar

    The region called Maine is the ancestral territory of indigenous communities. The COVID 19 pandemic has been triggering for tribal nations. Disease was one of the first weapons used against indigenous people, whether understood or not, diminishing and devastating native populations and aiding the taking of land. What does moving forward together look like?


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • Restate perspectives of Indigenous Communities from personal narratives
    • Explain why social inequity leads to certain outcomes
    • Identify basic knowledge of tribal nations in Maine

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Maulian Dana

      Maulian Dana

    • Tribal Ambassador Maulian Dana presents issues important to Penobscot Nation and wide native and non-native audiences. Her topics include land use, water rights, trial sovereignty, eradication of native American mascots, and establishing Indigenous People’s Day. Dana was born on the Penobscot Indian Island Reservation on May 17, 1984, and is one of five children. She is the daughter of former Penobscot Nation Chief Barry Dana, who served from 2000 to 2004. She attended the University of Maine with a focus in political science. In 2005 she was awarded the Margaret Chase Smith Public Policy Scholarship and went on to graduate in 2006.[2] She serves on the board of the Maine Center for Economic Policy, as co-chair of Maine Climate Councils Equity subcommittee, and as co-chair of the Permanent Commission on the Status of Racial Indigenous and Maine Tribal Populations.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    Our Voice: Harnessing Local Expertise to Create Healthier Communities

    How can community members use an app to capture their lived experience, become agents of change, and help their communities become healthier places to live?

    Our Voice LogoMontbello Walks Logo   GirlTrek Logo


     NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo    NCHEC CHES Logo

     

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public health professionals
    • Format: Webinar
    • Date/Time: Thursday, March 17th, 2022
      12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1 hour
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_03172022
      If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites None

    About this Webinar 

    Nobody knows the lived reality of a community better than the residents themselves. The Stanford Our Voice Initiative offers community groups tools and resources to help harness and activate this wisdom, and create healthier communities for all. During this session we will walk through the Our Voice approach, and highlight the inspiring work of a Denver grandma turned “streetfighter,” who has used data and built collaborations to generate changes that support healthy living in the Montbello neighborhood of Denver, Colorado.

    Like many underresourced communities, Denver’s Montbello neighborhood has lower socioeconomic status and poorer health outcomes than wealthier areas of the city. In 2016, a Park-n-Ride was moved from Montbello to a light-rail hub 2 miles away. While the new location provides easy car access and ample parking for drivers, Montbello’s pedestrians gained a dangerous commute down a 4-lane thoroughfare, decreasing community access to jobs, health care, schools, events, and city amenities. Forty-five year Montbello resident Pam Jiner was alarmed. As leader of a local GirlTrek group, she was already focused on getting African American women walking as a form of self-care and community engagement. When GirlTrek partnered with the evidence-based Stanford Our Voice Initiative to offer advocacy training, Pam stepped up. Using the Our Voice Discovery Tool app, she and her group became "citizen scientists," documenting environmental features that affected walkability between Montbello and the transportation hub. The data they gathered – geotagged photos, narratives, ratings, and walking maps – told a collective story that the group analyzed, prioritized, and used to generate recommendations for change. Pam also invited a wide range of local stakeholders and decision-makers to walk with her and experience the barriers first-hand. Four years later, Pam shares her story as a self-proclaimed “Street Fighter,” the built environment changes that she worked with others to make, and the ripple effects at the individual, social, and policy levels.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

    • List 4 specific strategies for community members to create change in local environments “from the bottom-up”
    • Describe the importance of data, including the systematic capture of local perspectives and insights, in advocating for community-level change
    • Assess the applicability of the Our Voice citizen science approach to a range of community-based efforts to address social determinants of health and improve health equity

    This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar." "


    More about the Our Voice Initiative 

    The evidence-based Our Voice Initiative is a not-for-profit social enterprise within the Stanford School of Medicine, offering diverse collaborators a set of tools and resources to advance community-driven solutions through citizen science. The ultimate goal of Our Voice is to advance health equity by giving everyone, regardless of age of social and economic circumstances, the opportunity to lead a healthy life. Through a remote train-the-trainer model and locally-facilitated process, community members use the multilingual Stanford Discovery Tool mobile app to record geotagged photos, narratives, ratings, and maps that document features of their environment that impact health and quality of life. After data are uploaded to a secure Stanford server, local facilitators can create user-friendly reports to return to the citizen scientists. The citizen scientists then review and analyze collective findings, prioritize areas for change, and use their own data to partner with local decision-makers and drive improvements that promote health in their local communities. For more information, visit http://ourvoice.stanford.edu



    Subject Matter Expert

    • Pam Jiner

      Pam Jiner

    • Pam Jiner is a community organizer and proud 45-year resident of Denver’s Montbello neighborhood. A leader in the GirlTrek health movement for black women and girls, she also founded Montbello Walks in 2018; leads the Senior Steppers walking group; and started a Mobile Food Pantry that delivered 875,000 pounds of food during the 2020 pandemic. Pam is a tireless advocate for safe and equitable city streets, sidewalks, schools and parks in the community she loves.



      Moderator

      • Ann Banchoff

        Ann Banchoff

      • Ann Banchoff, MSW, MPH, is Director of Community Engagement for the Our Voice Initiative at the Stanford School of Medicine. She has a background in public health, social work, and international human rights, as well as broad experience in developing and sustaining community-academic partnerships. Ann co-founded the Office of Community Health at the Stanford University School of Medicine in 2005, and served as its Director of Educational Programs until late 2014.


      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

      * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

    Category: Webinars

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals
    • Format: Webinar
    • Date/Time: Friday, January 21 2022 12:00 PM – 2:30 PM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 2.5 hours
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_01212022. 
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Webinar

    The Transgender Introductory Primer is ideal for a variety of professionals in the helping and health professions, particularly mental health, social service and medical providers. During this training, participants will learn basic terminology and theory, how to ask for pronouns, health disparities facing the transgender community, resiliency factors, gender transition paths and support needs, and targeted best practices. Providers will have an opportunity following the training to list themselves in MaineTransNet's community health database.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

    • Understand basic terminology and theory as they relate to transgender health.
    • Describe health disparities facing the transgender community.
    • Identify resiliency factors, gender transition paths and support needs, and targeted best practices for serving the transgender community.


    This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar. "


    Subject Matter Experts

    • Quinn Gormley

      Quinn Gormley

    • As the Executive Director of Maine TransNet, Quinn’s work ranges from community building initiatives, expanding health equity and access across the state, suicide prevention, policy advocacy, and violence prevention. Before MTN, Quinn worked in a variety of community organizing settings, including at the Health Equity Alliance managing a rural HIV testing program and building rural LGBTQ+ communities, and with the Maine People’s Alliance working on economic and health justice issues. Throughout her work, Quinn believes in centering the wellness of marginalized communities, and that the root of power and liberation can be found in communities that embrace their diversity and interdependence. She lives with her husband Ezra and their dog Zoe in Auburn, Maine.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    COVID Latinx Disparities

    What is the impact of COVID-19 on the Hispanic/Latinx community, and how can public health professionals help?

     RIPHI Rhode Island Public Health Institute Logo   

    NEPTHC New England Public Health Training Center Logo NCHEC CHES Logo

     

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public health professionals
    • Format: Webinar
    • Date/Time: January 19, 2022
      12:00 - 1:00 PM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1 hour
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_01192022.
      If you are not seeking CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites None

    About this Webinar 

    In this webinar, we will discuss the latest evidence about the trajectory of the COVID-19 epidemic, its impact on Hispanic/Latinx communities, and actions that we can take in our own areas of practice to address these health disparities.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

    • Conceptualize systems and structures that lead to COVID-19 disparities in the Hispanic/Latinx community
    • Describe effective approaches to addressing COVID-19 disparities
    • Discuss the latest evidence on the COVID-19 epidemic’s impact on Hispanic/Latinx communities
    • Identify potential points of synergy with COVID-19 and other health needs in the Hispanic/Latinx community

    This webinar will be recorded and made available within 2 business days of the webinar close. Please log in to view the recording in the section "View a Recording of the Webinar. "


    Subject Matter Expert

    • Matt Murphy
      Matt Murphy
      MD

    • Dr. Matthew Murphy is Assistant Professor of Medicine and Behavioral and Social Sciences at Brown University. He lives in a bilingual and bicultural household where Spanish is the primary language of communication. His work has been supported by the World Health Organization, The Pan American Health Organization, the NIH, the CDC and the European Commission. He was a Fulbright Research Fellow in Morocco where he led research on the impact of the country’s National HIV Program. He completed the European Master’s of Public Health as an Erasmus Mundus Fellow at the Andalusian School of Public Health in Granada, Spain and France’s National School of Public Health in Rennes, France. He was also named a Yale/Stanford Global Health Scholar and worked in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Universidad del Valle in Cali, Colombia. Dr. Murphy has worked extensively in Latin America with Brown University collaborating sites, the Pan American Health Organization as well as non-governmental organizations. As the Medical Director of Open Door Health, an Initiative of the Rhode Island Public Health Institute, he oversaw the implementation of a community adapted COVID-19 testing program which was described in the CDC’s Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal. He also supported the COVID-19 response in the state’s correctional system co-authoring several related publications in the Lancet among other high impact journals.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

    Category: Webinars

    Understanding Vaccine Confidence and Vaccine Hesitancy 

    How can health communication be effective in the context of misinformation, high emotion, and ineffective leadership?

     BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

    Register

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Monday, October 4th 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1 hour
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_UVCVH
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills, Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Recording

    Join us for a conversation about vaccine confidence and hesitancy with Dr. Heidi Larson. Dr. Larson’s new book, Stuck: How Vaccine Rumors Start — and Why They Don’t Go Away examines the origin of vaccine hesitancy and the efforts to address the anxiety and reluctance surrounding them..


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • List determinants of vaccine hesitancy identified from a historical perspective, related to contextual influences, individual/social group influences, and vaccine and vaccination-specific issues.
    • Describe the findings of a December 2020 international survey about intent to take vaccine when available, including variability across countries and factors associated with intent
    • Describe the effect of exposure to misinformation on willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in the US and UK
    • List the 4 factors included in the Vaccine Confidence Index
    • Describe effective health communication strategies and specific words in promoting vaccine use.

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Heidi Larson

      Heidi Larson
      @PROFHEIDILARSON

      Professor, Founding Director of the Vaccine Confidence Project, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

    • Sandro Galea

      Sandro Galea
      @SANDROGALEA

      MODERATOR
      Dean and Robert A Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    9/11. Twenty Years Later

    Do you remember where you were on 9/11/2001? That’s the date of multiple terrorist attacks in the United States that killed and wounded thousands of people and continue to impact population health, both mental and physical.

     BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

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    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Friday, September 10th 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1.5 hours
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_911TYL
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills, Public Health Sciences Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Recording

    This year commemorates the 20th Anniversary of 9/11. To mark this date, we are hosting a conversation about the events of September 11th and the health of the public. Our panelists will reflect on what we learned about health post-9/11, and what implications this event had for population health science today.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • List key long-term health findings from the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry
    • Explain innovations in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disease (PTSD)
    • Describe implications for future disaster preparedness efforts based on research findings from the WTC Health Program
    • State a recommendation about mental health treatment based on findings from the Mount Sinai research on mothers who were at the WTC when the towers collapsed and suffered from PTSD
    • Give examples of how systematic racism and classism influenced the population health impacts of 9/11

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Barbara Rothbaum

      Barbara Rothbaum
      @EMORYMEDICINE

      Professor in Psychiatry, Director of Emory Healthcare Veterans Program, Emory School of Medicine

      Barbara Olasov Rothbaum, PhD is Director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program. She is a professor and Associate Vice Chair of Clinical Research at Emory School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program and holds the Paul A. Janssen Chair in Neuropsychopharmcology. Dr. Rothbaum specializes in research on the treatment of anxiety disorders, particularly PTSD. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Study on Assessment of Ongoing Efforts in the Treatment of PTSD, and briefed the DOD, VA, House and Senate Committees on Veterans Affairs and Armed Services Committees on the IOM report results. Dr. Rothbaum has been studying PTSD treatments since 1986 and has developed, tested, and disseminated some of the most innovative and effective treatments available for PTSD. She is an inventor of virtual reality exposure therapy. She was a pioneer in applying it in the treatment of PTSD in combat veterans. She has authored over 400 scientific papers and chapters, has published 11 books on the treatment of PTSD and edited 4 others on anxiety, and received the Diplomate in Behavioral Psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology. She is a past president of the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS), is currently on the Scientific Advisory Boards for the Anxiety Disorders Association of America (ADAA), National Center for PTSD (NC-PTSD), and the executive committee of the Warrior Care Network. She is a fellow of the ACNP (American College of Neuropsychopharmacology), the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), and American Psychological Association’s Division 56 (Division of Trauma Psychology) and was awarded the 2010 “Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Practice of Trauma Psychology” for APA Division 56 and the Robert S. Laufer Award for Outstanding Scientific Achievement from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS).

    • David Vlahov

      David Vlahov
      @DAVID_VLAHOV
      MODERATOR, Associate Dean for Research and Professor, Yale School of Nursing, and Professor of Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health

      David Vlahov is associate dean for research and professor at the Yale School of Nursing and a professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. His primary area of focus has been on urban health. His studies in Baltimore, Harlem, and the Bronx, which have served as a platform for subsequent individual, community, and policy intervention studies. This work has contributed new knowledge to promote health equity. Vlahov was the founding president of the International Society for Urban Health. He has been a visiting professor at the medical school in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and served as an expert consultant to the World Health Organization’s Urban Health Center in Kobe, Japan. Vlahov is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Urban Health, has edited three books on urban health, and has published over 654 scholarly papers. He was the principal investigator of the Rockefeller Foundation project on the Roundtable for Urban Living Environment Research on urban health metrics and a member of the WHO Knowledge Network for Urban Settlements as part of the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. Vlahov served on the New York City Board of Health, and is a member of the National Academy of Medicine currently serving on the institute’s Board of Global Health.

    • Albeliz Santiago Colon

      Albeliz Santiago Colon
      @WTCHEALTHPRGM

      Associate Service Fellow, World Trade Center Health Program,
      Research Planning & Care Integration Unit

      Albeliz Santiago-Colón, Ph.D., is an Associate Service Fellow in the Research Planning & Care Integration Unit at the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program, which is administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Program provides no-cost medical monitoring and treatment for certified WTC-related health conditions to those directly affected by the 9/11 attacks in New York, the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Dr. Santiago-Colón assists with integrating research findings of the health impacts arising from the 9/11 attacks into the care and well-being of members. She recently coauthored a review article “World Trade Center Health Program: First Decade of Research” where she compiled and analyzed over two decades worth of research to support translational research. Within the Health Program, she specializes in uncovering knowledge gaps to inform future research needs. Before joining the WTC Health Program in 2019, she was an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) fellow at the Division of Field Studies and Engineering under NIOSH. While working as an ORISE fellow, she completed her dissertation on the association between maternal occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and selected birth defects of the face and central nervous system using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Originally from Puerto Rico, she received a B.S. in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. Her training in epidemiology has focused on environmental health, maternal and child health, and occupational exposure assessment.

    • Rachel Yehuda

      Rachel Yehuda
      @RACHELYEHUDA

      Professor and Vice Chair of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

      Rachel Yehuda, Ph.D. is a Professor and Vice Chair of Psychiatry, and Professor of Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is also the Mental Health Director at the Bronx Veterans Affairs. Dr. Yehuda is a recognized leader in the field of traumatic stress studies and has authored hundreds of papers and 10 books in the field of traumatic stress and the neuroscience of PTSD. She is the recipient of numerous awards and federal grants. Her current interests include PTSD prevention and innovative approaches to treatment, the study of risk and resilience, epigenetics and the intergenerational transmission of trauma and PTSD. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and has recently established a Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research at Mount Sinai.

    • Mark Farfel

      Mark Farfel
      @NYCHEALTHY

      Director,
      World Trade
      Center Health Registry
      New York City Department of Health
      and Mental Hygiene

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret

    Inequities in waste water infrastructure is a wide-spread but largely under-appreciated problem in the United States.  How can public health professionals bring light to the problem and thus help propel needed changes in policy and resource allocation?

     BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

    Register

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Thursday, September 9th 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM EST
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1.25 hours
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_WOWFAMDS
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Cultural Competency, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Recording

    SPH Reads is a school-wide reading program hosted by the Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice. The 2021 book selection is Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret, by Catherine Coleman Flowers.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss waste water infrastructure as an example of environmental injustice
    • Identify examples of systemic racism and classism that have negatively affected health in the United States
    • Identify possible specific activities individuals can participate in to address large issues of climate change and structural racism

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Catherine Coleman Flowers

      Catherine Coleman Flowers
      @CATHFLOWERS

      Environmental and Climate Justice Activist, Author

    • Catherine Coleman Flowers is an internationally recognized environmental activist, MacArthur “genius” grant recipient, and author. She has dedicated her life’s work to advocating for environmental justice, primarily equal access to clean water and functional sanitation for communities across the United States. Founder of the Center for Rural Enterprise and Environmental Justice (CREEJ), Flowers has spent her career promoting equal access to clean water, air, sanitation, and soil to reduce health and economic disparities in marginalized, rural communities. In addition, Flowers serves as Rural Development Manager for Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), is a Board Member for the Center for Earth Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, and sits on the Board of Directors for the Climate Reality Project and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Flowers is also Co-Chair of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Commission on Accelerating Climate Action and Practitioner in Residence at Duke University. In 2021, her leadership and fervor in fighting for solutions to these issues led her to one of her most notable appointments yet — Vice Chair of the Biden Administration’s inaugural White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council. Flowers was also named Levenick Resident Scholar in Sustainable Leadership at the University of Illinois for the spring 2021 and was awarded an honorary PhD in science from Wesleyan University. As the author of Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret, Flowers shares her inspiring story of advocacy, from childhood to environmental justice champion. She discusses sanitation and its correlation with systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that affects people across the United States. She has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Bloomberg, The Guardian, and on PBS.

    • Barbara Moran

      Barbara Moran
      @MORANWRITER

      Moderator
      Senior Producing Editor
      WBUR

    • Barbara Moran, environmental editor, WBUR For more than 20 years, Moran has worked as a science journalist committed to covering issues of public health, environmental justice and the intersection of science and society. She has written for many publications, including The New York Times, New Scientist, Technology Review and the Boston Globe Magazine, and produced television documentaries for PBS and others. A few years ago she added radio reporting to her repertoire, and now runs WBUR’s three-person environmental team, which covers stories about energy, ecology and environmental justice for Boston and beyond. She was a Knight Fellow at MIT, and was twice awarded the National Association of Science Writers’ highest honor, the Science in Society Award.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals, Community Health Workers
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Wednesday, September 29th 2020 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM EST.
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1.75 hours
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.75 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1133137_09292021. 
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: None
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Webinar

    This webinar will use didactic and workshop techniques to inform participants of best practices in public health communication to promote equity and inclusion. An overview of health literacy will be discussed, as well as how it connects to health equity. We will also speak about health literacy efforts in our community, and review how health literacy can be improved using digital literacy, cross-cultural communication, and non-biased language.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the landscape of health literacy and choose inclusive language
    • Develop public health messaging that incorporates numerous aspects of literacy that impacts health
    • Identify communication strategies to promote the use of inclusive and non-stigmatizing language as part of public health communication

    Subject Matter Experts

    • Jennifer Ceide

      Jennifer Ceide, MPH

    • Jennifer Ceide has worked in the field of public health since 2009, with a strong emphasis on health education and communication. Her focus on developing educational programs for patients with Asthma afforded her the opportunity to present her work to clinicians of the Shanghai Children Medical Center in Shanghai, China. Her leadership in guiding the implementation of tobacco cessation systems at Jamaica Hospital led to the Gold Star Recognition in the NYC Tobacco-Free Hospital Campaign Certification from the New York City Department of Health. She currently serves as Primary Faculty for the Master of Public Health program at the University of New England in Maine. Jennifer recently developed a Health Education Design course that has been described as challenging, practical, and enjoyable by MPH students. Jennifer is Haitian-American and was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY. She attributes much of her success to being raised in a richly diverse community and obtaining both undergraduate and graduate degrees from institutions in Jamaica-Queens, NY and New Orleans, LA, two culturally-vibrant US cities.

    • Liz Scharnetzki

      Liz Scharnetzki, Ph.D.

    • Liz Scharnetzki, Ph.D., is a Staff Scientist at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) at Maine Medical Center Research Institute (MMCRI). Dr. Scharnetzki completed her PhD in Experimental Social Psychology at the University of Vermont. Her research interests lie in understanding how stigma and identity threat impact the delivery and receipt of health care. Before joining CORE, Dr. Scharnetzki worked at Vermont’s Agency of Human Services, developing policy research projects aimed at promoting social capital within Vermont’s criminal justice system. Dr. Scharnetzki’s other prior positions include serving as a lecturer at universities and colleges in both California and Vermont, and working as a Research Technician at one of the NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative sites. Dr. Scharnetzki currently serves on the National Lung Cancer Roundtable Stigma Committee and co-leads MMCRI’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Workgroup.

    • Leo Waterston

      Leo Waterston, M.A.

    • Leo Waterston, M.A., is the Program Director for the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) at Maine Medical Center Research Institute, where he is responsible for the Center’s operations, strategic planning, and management of staff and resources to support CORE’s mission. Leo also serves as Project Director for the Maine Lung Cancer Coalition, a grant-funded lung cancer prevention and screening program with partners throughout the state of Maine. Leo has more than 15 years of experience working in health care research, management, and public health. He earned a B.A. in Psychology from Clark University and a M.A. in Clinical Psychology from Fordham University. He currently serves on the National Lung Cancer Roundtable and Maine's Impact Cancer Network. Orion Tucker (he/him) has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Psychology from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, where he completed his senior capstone in LGBTQ+ Politics. Orion, from his lived experiences, brings a passion for improving diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in order to enact meaningful change for the LGBTQ+ community. He brings this drive to his work every day as Health Equity Alliance’s LGBTQ+ Program Manager. Over the years, Orion has provided education, training, consulting, and curriculum design to community-based agencies, healthcare organizations, colleges and universities, businesses, and others to expand competency and affirming experiences for LGBTQ+ identifying individuals in the various communities he has served. Orion is also a Certified Personal Trainer who values behavior change and meeting people where they are.

    • Orion Tucker

      Orion Tucker

    • Orion Tucker (he/him) has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Psychology from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, where he completed his senior capstone in LGBTQ+ Politics. Orion, from his lived experiences, brings a passion for improving diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in order to enact meaningful change for the LGBTQ+ community. He brings this drive to his work every day as Health Equity Alliance’s LGBTQ+ Program Manager. Over the years, Orion has provided education, training, consulting, and curriculum design to community-based agencies, healthcare organizations, colleges and universities, businesses, and others to expand competency and affirming experiences for LGBTQ+ identifying individuals in the various communities he has served. Orion is also a Certified Personal Trainer who values behavior change and meeting people where they are.

    • Inza Ouattara

      Inza Ouattara

    • With a Doctorate in Educational Leadership, a Master of Public Policy and Management and as a Licensed Social Worker, Dr. Ouattara currently works as the State of Maine Refugee Health Coordinator. Dr. Ouattara has 21 years of experience working with refugees and immigrants in Africa and in the United States. In his current position, Dr. Ouattara oversees the domestic medical screening of refugees, asylees, and other ORR eligible populations in Maine. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Southern New Hampshire University teaching Sociocultural Perspective.

    • Andrew Solomon

      Andrew Solomon

    • Andrew P. Solomon, MPH, is the Senior Program Manager for the federally funded Northeast Telehealth Resource Center (www.NETRC.org), a member of the National Consortium of Telehealth Resource Centers and a project of Medical Care Development, Inc. (www.MCD.org). Andrew has worked with over 600 health care provider organizations, government agencies, and others to design, implement, and optimize telehealth programs. NETRC’s scope of services cover the “A to Z” of telehealth program development, including legal and regulatory considerations, quality and equity best practices, training resources, and sustainability. Andrew’s experiences also include developing and managing a population health program at a Community Health Center in Rhode Island. There, he implemented projects such as text-messaging programs to improve patient engagement and a transportation program to assist patients in getting to appointments and other health-related services. Andrew holds a Master of Public Health from Boston University.

    • Kerri Barton

      Kerri Barton

    • Kerri earned her MPH at Boston University School of Public Health in 2011. She has since worked for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health as an infectious disease epidemiologist, at Maine Medical Center as a Rural Research Navigator, and now works for the City of Portland Public Health Division as the Interim Program Coordinator for Harm Reduction Services in the Needle Exchange Program.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    Category: Webinars

    Antiracism as Health Policy (Part 3)

    Why does intersectionality matter when studying health disparities and how does this relate to COVID susceptibilities among men and women of color?

     BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health LogoNCHEC CHES Logo    

    Register

    Course Information

    • Audience: Public Health Professionals
    • Format: Recorded Webinar
    • Date/Time: Wednesday, April 7th 2021 4:30 PM – 6 PM EST.
    • Price: Free
    • Length: 1.5 hours
    • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_AHP3. 
      If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
    • Competencies: Analytical/Assessment Skills
      Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
    • Learning Level: Awareness
    • Companion Trainings: Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 1)
      Antiracism as Health Policy  (Part 2)
    • Supplemental materials:None
    • Pre-requisites: None

    About this Recording

    Part 3: Antiracist policy solutions

    This three-part series will examine the racial disparities in health brought vividly to public attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. The third panel will conclude our series with examining antiracist policy solutions that are informed by data.

    Cohosted with Boston University Center for Antiracist Research.


    What you'll learn

    At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

    • Describe the approach and requirements of the Anti-Racism in Public Health Act of 2020, introduced in September 2020
    • Describe three essential elements of antiracist health policy solutions
    • Discuss importance of intersectional antiracism research and practice
    • Discuss lessons learned from the COVID experience in New York City about an antiracist approach to public health emergencies
    • Describe a framework for advancing health equity through policies for care delivery and payment reform

    Subject Matter Expert

    • Sandro Galea

      Sandro Galea
      @sandrogalea

      Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    • Ibram Kendi

      Ibram Kendi
      @dribram

      Director andFounder,
      Center for Antiracist Research, Boston University

    • Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and four #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky and Four Hundred Souls: A Community history of African America 1619-2019, edited with Keisha N. Blain. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

    • Elizabeth Warren

      Elizabeth Warren
      @senwarren

      (OPENING CONVERSATION)
      U.S. Senate, Massachusetts

    • Elizabeth Warren, a fearless consumer advocate who has made her life’s work the fight for middle class families, was elected to the United States Senate on November 6, 2012, by the people of Massachusetts. Elizabeth is recognized as one of the nation’s top experts on bankruptcy and the financial pressures facing middle class families, and the Boston Globe has called her “the plainspoken voice of people getting crushed by so many predatory lenders and under regulated banks.” She is widely credited for the original thinking, political courage, and relentless persistence that led to the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. President Obama asked her to set up the new agency to hold Wall Street banks and other financial institutions accountable, and to protect consumers from financial tricks and traps often hidden in mortgages, credit cards and other financial products. In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, Warren served as Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). Her independent and tireless efforts to protect taxpayers, to hold Wall Street accountable, and to ensure tough oversight of both the Bush and Obama Administrations won praise from both sides of the aisle. The Boston Globe named Elizabeth Warren Bostonian of the Year and TIME Magazine called her a “New Sheriff of Wall Street” for her oversight efforts. During her campaign for the Senate, Elizabeth promised to fight for middle class families and to make sure that everyone has a fair shot to get ahead. She called for policies that would level the regulatory playing field for small businesses and ensure that everyone – even large and powerful corporations – pays a fair share in taxes and is held accountable for breaking the law. Endorsing Elizabeth’s candidacy, the New Bedford Standard-Times said, “Elizabeth Warren has it right on all the things that matter most to us in SouthCoast and across Massachusetts,” with “principles that without a doubt, promote the well-being of the middle class.” The Boston Globe called Elizabeth “a fierce advocate for the lot of working families, creating educational opportunities, and expanding medical research.” The Springfield Republican said, “We need a voice for working families in Washington again. Elizabeth Warren will give us that voice.” Senator Warren was a law professor for more than 30 years, including nearly 20 years as the Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. The graduating class at Harvard twice recognized her with the Sacks-Freund Award for excellence in teaching. She taught courses on commercial law, contracts, and bankruptcy and wrote more than a hundred articles and ten books, including three national best-sellers, A Fighting Chance, The Two-Income Trap, and All Your Worth. National Law Journal named her one of the Most Influential Lawyers of the Decade, TIME Magazine has named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world four times, and she has been honored by the Massachusetts Women’s Bar Association with the Lelia J. Robinson Award. Elizabeth learned first-hand about the economic pressures facing working families, growing up in a family she says was “on the ragged edge of the middle class.” She got married at 19, and after graduating from college, started teaching in elementary school. Her first baby, a daughter Amelia, was born when Elizabeth was 22. When Amelia was two, Elizabeth started law school. Shortly after she graduated, her son Alex was born. Elizabeth hung out a shingle and practiced law out of her living room, but she soon returned to teaching. Elizabeth is a graduate of the University of Houston and Rutgers School of Law. Elizabeth and her husband Bruce Mann have been married for 38 years and live in Cambridge, Massachusetts with their golden retriever, Bailey. They have three grandchildren.

    • Dustin Duncan

      Dustin Duncan
      @drdustinduncan

      Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

    • Dustin T. Duncan, ScD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he directs Columbia’s Spatial Epidemiology Lab and co-directs the department’s Social and Spatial Epidemiology Unit. Dr. Duncan is a Social and Spatial Epidemiologist. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men and transgender women of color. His work appears in leading public health, epidemiology, medical, geography, criminology, demography, and psychology journals. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 150 high-impact articles, book chapters and books, and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s recent work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

    • Torian Easterling

      Torian Easterling
      @drtorian

      First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

    • Dr. Easterling serves as the First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH). Dr. Easterling has spent more than 5 years in a senior leadership role at the Health Department. Prior to serving as First Deputy Commissioner and Chief Equity Officer, Dr. Easterling served as Deputy Commissioner of the Center for Health Equity and Community Wellness at the NYC DOHMH, where he oversaw programmatic work focused on reducing overall premature mortality and closing the racial gap on the top leading causes of preventable death. He also served as the Assistant Commissioner of the Department of Health’s Bureau of Brooklyn Neighborhood Health, where he helped advance key programming to address pressing concerns, including maternal deaths and gun violence. Dr. Easterling is a community physician committed to health equity, social justice and movement building to achieve the health outcomes that all people deserve both locally and globally. Dr. Easterling holds a Bachelor of Science from Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) from Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H) from Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York. He completed his residency in Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens, NY and a General Preventive Medicine residency at Icahn School of Medicine at Sinai in New York.

    • Regina Davis Moss

      Regina Davis Moss
      @dr4equity

      (MODERATOR)

      Associate Executive Director, American Public Health Association

    • Regina Davis Moss is the associate executive director of the American Public Health Association. She oversees a broad portfolio of programs addressing the social determinants of health and has nearly 20 years of experience managing national health promotion initiatives addressing health equity, women’s health, and public health system capacity building. Formerly, Dr. Davis Moss held a senior management position for a chronic disease prevention effort for the National Institute of Health. Prior to that, she worked for the Kaiser Family Foundation where she helped launch the Kaiser Health News online information service and served as the senior producer. Dr. Davis Moss came to Kaiser after serving as a supervisor for an epidemiologic study focused on women’s reproductive health. She also served as a public health service fellow in the Office on Women’s Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Davis Moss earned her Ph.D. in Maternal and Child Health from the University of Maryland, College Park; M.P.H. from George Washington University; B.S. from Howard University, and certificate in public health performance improvement from the University of Minnesota.

    • Consuelo H. Wilkins

      Consuelo H. Wilkins
      @drchwilkins

      Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity, Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    • Consuelo H. Wilkins, MD, MSCI, Professor of Medicine, Vice President for Health Equity and Associate Dean for Health Equity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is a nationally recognized thought leader in health equity and in addressing the elimination of systemic inequities that impact the health and well-being of racial/ethnic minorities. As a community engagement research scientist, Dr. Wilkins has pioneered new approaches to engaging vulnerable, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and minority populations. She is Principal Investigator of three NIH-funded centers, the Vanderbilt-Miami-Meharry Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine and Population Health; the Center for Improving Clinical Trial Education Recruitment and Enrollment at CTSA Hubs; and the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. She is also PI of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation award on engendering trust in health care among African American men. Dr. Wilkins earned a Bachelor of Science in microbiology and Doctor of Medicine from Howard University. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a Geriatric Medicine fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Following her medical training, she earned a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Washington University School of Medicine.

    • >Marshall Chin

      Marshall Chin
      @marshallchinmd

      Chair, Family Medicine,
       Boston University
      School of
      Public Health

    • Marshall Chin, MD, MPH, is a general internist with extensive experience improving the care of vulnerable patients with chronic disease. He has worked to advance diabetes care and outcomes on the South Side through health care system and community interventions. He also leads initiatives to improve health strategies at a national level as director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)’s Finding Answers: Solving Disparities Through Payment and Delivery System Reform Program Office and Co-Director of the Merck Foundation’s Bridging the Gap: Reducing Disparities in Diabetes Care National Program Office. Dr. Chin performed many of the key research studies informing how to improve diabetes care and outcomes in federally-qualified health centers serving vulnerable populations with limited resources. His work over the past decade leading RWJF’s Finding Answers program led to the creation of the Roadmap to Reduce Disparities. Current projects include improving diabetes outcomes in real-world settings, reducing health disparities by transforming the way care is organized and paid for, enhancing care by facilitating partnerships between the health care system and other sectors such as food and housing, and improving shared decision making among clinicians and LGBTQ people of color. In addition to his clinical and research roles, Dr. Chin is a teacher and award-winning mentor, committed to providing opportunities for trainees. As co-director of the Summer Program in Outcomes Research Training (SPORT), Dr. Chin educates faculty, fellows and students about outcomes research methods — to better understand and improve quality of care. An expert in health care disparities in medicine, Dr. Chin frequently is invited to present his work at national conferences and serve on policy committees. He serves on the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities National Advisory Council and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Community Preventive Services Task Force. He co-chairs the National Quality Forum (NQF) Disparities Standing Committee and is a former President of the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM). Dr. Chin was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2017.

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    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

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