Anti-Fatness in Public Health

Reconsidering "obesity" and its "prevention"

How does weight stigma and anti-fat bias intersect with public health practice? 



              NEPHTC New England Public Health Training Center Logo  

Enroll

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health workers, researchers, healthcare providers
  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: 1 hour Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1. total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_03252023.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this course

A growing body of research implicates exposure to weight stigma in a variety of negative health outcomes (independent of BMI), including all-cause mortality and suicidality. Fat liberation activists have identified public health and healthcare systems as sources of weight stigma for more than 50 years. To disrupt the cycles of discrimination and poor health that jeopardize fat people’s well-being, Public health needs a paradigm shift from "obesity prevention" to understanding weight stigma as a social and structural determinant. 

In the first webinar, we learned about weight stigma as a normative component of public health and healthcare settings. 

This webinar will focus on practical strategies for recognizing and interrupting weight stigma in everyday public health research and practice.


What you'll learn

After completing the training, you will be able to...

  • Define weight stigma as a system of oppression directed toward fatness
  • Differentiate weight stigma mitigation from stigma eradication
  • Explain stigma mitigation strategies available to public health practitioners and researchers 
  • Recognize weight stigma’s multiple frames & manifestations within public health 
  • Identify limitations of “weight inclusivity” in public health research and practice

Subject Matter Experts




 
 Marquisele (Mikey) Mercedes    Monica Kriete, MPH

Presidential Fellow, Brown University School of Public Health, Co-host, Unsolicited: Fatties Talk Back 
 
Writer, speaker, and consultant 



Enrollment and Contact Hours

Note there are two different options for enrolling in this course highlighted in the table below.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the module. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Sponsored by NEPHTC & YSPH, a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to1total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are0. Provider ID #1131137. Event ID #SS1131137_AFAPH


Having trouble accessing the course? Contact support@nephtc.org


Acknowledgement:
This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Towards a Weight Inclusive Public Health - Part 1: Understanding Weight Stigma

Reconsidering "obesity" and its "prevention"

How does weight stigma and anti-fat bias intersect with public health practice? 



              NEPHTC New England Public Health Training Center Logo  

Enroll

Course Information

  • Audience: Public Health workers, researchers, healthcare providers
  • Format: Self-paced
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: 1 hour Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1. total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 0. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: PM1131137_03252023.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Health Equity
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this course

A growing body of research implicates exposure to weight stigma in a variety of negative health outcomes (independent of BMI), including all-cause mortality and suicidality. Fat liberation activists have identified public health and healthcare systems as sources of weight stigma for more than 50 years. To disrupt the cycles of discrimination and poor health that jeopardize fat people’s well-being, Public health needs a paradigm shift from "obesity prevention" to understanding weight stigma as a social and structural determinant. 

The second webinar
(Click here to register!) will focus on practical strategies for recognizing and interrupting weight stigma in everyday public health research and practice.

What you'll learn

After completing the training, you will be able to...

  • Define weight stigma as the devaluation of fatness and fat people
  • Describe how weight stigma functions as a social determinant of health
  • Explain how weight stigma mediates relationships between fatness and poor health outcomes 
  • Analyze how the construct of “obesity” naturalizes the health consequences of weight stigma as integral to fat embodiment 
  • Illustrate the weight stigmatizing consequences of “obesity prevention” as a public health priority

Subject Matter Experts



 
 Marquisele (Mikey) Mercedes    Monica Kriete, MPH

Presidential Fellow, Brown University School of Public Health, Co-host, Unsolicited: Fatties Talk Back 
 
Writer, speaker, and consultant 



Enrollment and Contact Hours

Note there are two different options for enrolling in this course highlighted in the table below.

The Certificate of Completion will include the length of the module. Generally 50 – 60 minutes is equivalent to 1 contact hour. Contact hours may be applicable towards continuing education requirements for certain credentials. Check with your credentialing body to verify if the topic meets its continuing education requirements.

Sponsored by NEPHTC & YSPH, a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to1total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are0. Provider ID #1131137. 


Having trouble accessing the course? Contact support@nephtc.org


Acknowledgement:
This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of award 2 UB6HP31685‐05‐00 “Public Health Training Centers.” The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.