Course Information

  • Audience: Program administrators/managers, data managers, data analysts, quality improvement/performance improvement staff, program evaluators, and public health workforce members interested in learning about how to use data for racial equity and health equity.
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded on February 17, 2021
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours are 1. Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_REDR. 
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the post-test and evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Data Analytics and Assessment Skills,
  • Learning Level: Performance
  • Companion Trainings:
  • Supplemental materials:PowerPoint of presentation, Links to addtional resources inlcuding the Racial Equity Data Road Map
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

This presentation will describe the Racial Equity Data Road Map, a tool developed at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to facilitate using data towards eliminating structural racism. Use of the Racial Equity Data Road Map can support programs to authentically engage communities; frame data in the broader historical and structural contexts that impact health; communicate that inequities are unfair, unjust and preventable; and design solutions that address racism and other root causes of inequities. Presenters will address common challenges related to using data to inform racial equity work, program monitoring, quality improvement and performance management.



What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • State or identify how a racial equity approach can be applied to data, continuous quality improvement (CQI), and program implementation
  • Apply strategies to enhance the use of data to promote racial equity
  • List three sources of available data

Subject Matter Experts

  • Christine Silva

    Christine Silva

  • Christine Silva, MPH is an Epidemiologist at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. As the Director of the Massachusetts Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program, Ms. Silva is responsible for all operational aspects of Massachusetts MIECHV including program operations, implementation, and adherence to federal grant and reporting requirements. She previously served as the program epidemiologist responsible for conducting analyses for the purposes of program monitoring and development, quality improvement, and evaluation of MIECHV. Ms. Silva is charged with demonstrating program effectiveness and measuring the impact of services for statewide evidence-based home visiting models. Ms. Silva received a B.A from Boston University and an MPH from the Boston University School of Public Health, and is a certified Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

  • Sarah Lederberg Stone

    Sarah Lederberg Stone

  • Sarah Lederberg Stone, MPH, PhD,is an Epidemiologist in the Division of Maternal and Child Health Research and Analysis at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.  Dr. Stone supports the Massachusetts WIC Program (the USDA’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children),with an emphasis on using data to promote health equity. She also plays a key role in drafting the annual Title V MCH Block Grant report and the five-year needs assessment to select state Title V priorities and develop structural and process measures.  Dr. Stone is a certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, and earned her MPH and PhD in Epidemiology from the Boston University School of Public Health, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in MCH Applied Epidemiology through the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.


Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in high cost of emergency room visits
  • Format: Recorded Webinar
  • Date/Time: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: 1131137 Event ID: SS1131137_HPAER.
    If you are not seeking a CHES/MCHES contact hours, If you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
     
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: None
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Recording

Americans make more than 140 million trips to the emergency room each year, but usually don’t know the price until a bill shows up in the mail. New York Times journalist Sarah Kliff spent 18 months collecting thousands of emergency room bills, and made public the prices that hospitals try to keep secret. From $629 Band Aids to $5,571 charges for just sitting in a waiting room, Ms. Kliff will discuss what her reporting found, what it tells us about the American health care system, and the policy solutions Congress could use to fix it.


What you'll learn

At the end of the recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe legislative and policy relief for “surprise billing” to patients
  • List 3 loop-holes in the “No Surprises Act”
  • Describe tactics patients can use to advocate for themselves in terms of hospital billing
  • Discuss relative benefit of various policy options (e.g., patient choice, increase in transparency, rate-setting) in reducing hospital costs


Moderator


  • Wendy Mariner

    Emeritus Professor, BU School of Public Health

  • Professor Mariner is the Edward R. Utley Professor of Health Law at Boston University School of Public Health, Professor in the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Professor in the Department of Health Law, Policy & Management, and Director of the JD-MPH dual degree program at Boston University School of Public Health; Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law; and Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. Professor Mariner’s research focuses on laws governing health risks, including social and personal responsibility for risk creation, health insurance systems, implementation of the Affordable Care Act, ERISA, health information privacy, and population health policy. She has co-authored three editions of the law school textbook, PUBLIC HEALTH LAW, Third Edition (Wendy Mariner, George J Annas, Nicole Huberfeld & Michael Ulrich, 2019), Second Edition (Wendy Mariner & George J Annas, 2014), and First Edition (Ken Wing, Wendy Mariner, George Annas & Dan Strouse, 2007), and published more than 100 articles in the legal, medical and health policy literature on public health law, patients and consumers’ rights, health care reform, insurance benefits and regulation, AIDS policy, immunization, research with human beings, and reproductive rights. She is Chair of the American Bar Association Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice, having previously served as Vice Chair and Secretary, and was a member of the ABA Special Committee on Bioethics and the Law. Professor Mariner also serves as Program Chair of the Program in Health Law & Human Rights, a joint project with the Public Health Regulations Analysis Center of the National School of Public Health of the New University of Lisbon. Professor Mariner has served on state, national, and international boards and commissions, including the Massachusetts Health Facilities Appeals Board, the Massachusetts Health Care Quality and Cost Council Advisory Committee, the Massachusetts Health Information Technology Council Advisory Committee; the National Institutes of Health AIDS Advisory Committee, the Committee for the International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects, the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association, and Institute of Medicine committees. Her university activities have included serving as Chair of the Boston University Faculty Council and ex officio member of the Trustees of Boston University, Co-Director of Regulatory Knowledge and Research Ethics of Boston University’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute, and member of the Boston University Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion and other university committees. She was the American Journal of Public Health’s Contributing Editor for Health Law and Ethics and currently serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Health Politics, Policy & Law, the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, and the Human Rights and the Global Economy. With health law colleagues, she has submitted amicus curiae briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States in cases involving health law issues, including the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act.

Subject Matter Expert


  • Sarah Kliff

    Investigative Reporter, The New York Times

  • Sarah Kliff is one of the country’s leading health policy journalists, who has spent nearly a decade chronicling Washington’s battle over the Affordable Care Act. Her reporting has inspired new legislation in Congress, been cited by the Supreme Court, and resulted in multiple hospitals revising their billing policies. Sarah is currently an investigative reporter at the New York Times and, before that, was a senior policy correspondent at the website Vox. She has also covered health care for the Washington Post, Politico, and Newsweek magazine.
    Sarah is the recipient of multiple reporting awards, including fellowships from the Association of Health Care Journalists and the Annenberg School of Journalism at the University of Southern California. The Supreme Court cited Sarah’s work in their 2012 decision upholding the health care law. After she broke news in early 2017 that Republican legislators had exempted their own coverage from their Obamacare repeal bill, the House of Representatives took a vote to close that loophole.
    Sarah is a frequent television guest and has appeared on CBS, PBS, Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC. She enjoys public speaking and, most recently, has presented at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, the Aspen Ideas Festival, the Colorado Health Institute and the California Health Care Foundation.


Registration and Contact Hours

Select the Enroll button below to register for this recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in suicide causes, evidence and prevention
  • Format: Recorded Seminar/Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_12102020.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 1: Understanding Suicide

    Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 2: Stopping Suicide
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Seminar Recording

This is the third part in a three-part symposium on suicide at BUSPH. BUSPH symposia are conversations about things that affect the health of populations. The first two parts looked at the research on causes and evidence around suicide prevention. Given the research, the relatively little progress public health has made on suicide, and worries during this time of economic and social stressors, this part of the symposia explores what public health can do to prevent suicide.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 5 protective factors that are associated with reduced risk of suicide in youth
  • Discuss importance of partnerships with faith communities in the prevention of suicide
  • Describe effects of stigma and their possible interventions across levels of analysis (individual, interpersonal, structural) on suicide risk among LGBTQ youth
  • List 5 community-based (“non-medical) intervention strategies that have been shown to be effective in preventing suicide
  • Discuss possible reasons and potential interventions for elevated risk of suicide post-discharge from hospitalization for suicidality
  • Discuss the association of suicide risk and the COVID pandemic and possible interventions to address it

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


    Subject Matter Experts


  • Sherry Molock

    Associate Professor, George Washington University


  • Mark Hatzenbuehler

    Associate Professor, Harvard
    University

  • Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, PhD, is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Psychology at Harvard. He was previously an Associate Professor (with tenure) and Deputy Chair for Faculty Development and Research Strategy in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia. Dr. Hatzenbuehler received his PhD in clinical psychology from Yale and completed his post-doctoral training in population health at Columbia, where he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar. Dr. Hatzenbuehler’s work examines the role of stigma in shaping population health inequalities, with a particular focus on the mental health consequences of structural forms of stigma. His research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and through the William T. Grant Foundation Scholars Program. He has received several early career and distinguished contribution awards from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2019, he was one of only 204 social scientists named to the prestigious Highly Cited Researcher List by Clarivate Analytics in recognition of his research influence, as demonstrated by the production of multiple highly-cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in Web of Science. Dr. Hatzenbuehler is an elected fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, the premier honorary organization for scientists working at the interface of behavior and medicine, and he has been appointed to serve on two consensus committees at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


  • Lisa Wexler

    Professor,
    University of
    Michigan

  • Lisa Wexler, Ph.D., MSW is a Professor in the School of Social Work and at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, and her research focuses on suicide prevention, wellness/resilience and praxis. Her community-engaged research engages participants in all levels of the process, responds to cultural and community priorities, and builds on and promotes personal and collective assets. Currently, she is working with community partners test the efficacy of a community mobilization approach to suicide prevention for rural Indigenous communities. The intervention, Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES), showed great promise in a pilot in Northwest Alaska (R34 MH096884) with results that showed learning and behavior change in attendees as well as close associates of participants. The ripple effect is important, and will be further tested in a larger trial in Bering Strait (R01 MH112458)( see: http://www.pc-cares.org/). Dr. Wexler with Drs. Rasmus and Allen (U19 MH113138) are working to identify vital community targets associated with reduced youth suicide risk within 3 rural and remote regions of Alaska. The study is a central component of a center called, Alaska Native Collaborative Hub for Research on Resilience (ANCHRR) (see: https://www.anchrr.org/). Her school-based research utilizes Intergenerational Dialogue Exchange and Action (IDEA)—a participatory research method—to engage young people in efforts to find local strengths, skills and wisdom through cross-generational and community-based investigations that—through the effort–enhance youth possibilities for action and strengthen their social connections within and outside of their home communities. Lastly, she has been working with tribal partners to develop a firearm lethal means restriction intervention called the Family Safety Net, which is a universal, clinic-based brief intervention to increase home safety. These various projects integrate Indigenous knowledge and participation in research to address local needs while maximizing the study’s public health impact.


  • Natalie Riblet

    Assistant Professor, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • Natalie Riblet is a staff psychiatrist at the White River Junction VA Medical Center, where she has both clinical and research roles. She graduated with an MD from Dartmouth Medical School in 2008 and an MPH from Dartmouth in 2012. She completed her residencies at Dartmouth, including general preventive medicine and public health in 2012 as well as general psychiatry in 2014. After completing a VA fellowship in Patient Safety in 2016, she completed a VA New England Early Research Career Development Award in 2019. As part of this VISN1 CDA, she developed a VA adaptation of the successful World Health Organization Brief Intervention and Contact Program. She is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry and of the Dartmouth Institute at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.
    In Natalie’s current research roles, she is focused on identifying and testing interventions to prevent death by suicide. This work is supported through funding from the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center White River Junction and the National Center for Patient Safety Center of Inquiry Program. Natalie was also recently awarded a VA Clinical Science Research & Development (CSR&D) Career Development Award. As part of the award period, Natalie will study a suicide prevention intervention that builds off of her prior work with the goal of improving social connectedness and engagement in treatment after psychiatric hospitalization.


  • Julia Raifman

    Assistant Professor, Boston
    University

  • Julia Raifman, ScD, SM conducts research on how health and social policies drive population health and health disparities. Much of her current work is focused on evaluating how state and federal policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis are shaping the spread of COVID-19 and mental distress during the pandemic. She created the COVID-19 U.S. State Policy Database (CUSP) to facilitate widespread, rapid response research on how state policies are affecting health and well-being: https://tinyurl.com/statepolicies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, her research includes analyses on associations between LGBT rights and mental distress and on associations between state firearm policies and adolescent suicide. She also conducts research on how structural stigma and structural racism shape disparities in the burden of infectious diseases such as HIV and COVID-19. Dr. Raifman's research has been covered in the New York Times, The Guardian, National Public Radio, and The Advocate. Dr. Raifman teaches Quantitative Methods for Health Services and Policy Research. She enjoys mentoring and is committed to promoting the success of diverse students. Dr. Raifman received her doctoral and masters degree from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins prior to joining Boston University.


  • Jaimie Gradus

    Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

  • Jaimie L. Gradus is an Associate Professor Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her BA in psychology from Stony Brook University, her MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics and DSc in epidemiology at Boston University and her DMSc at Aarhus University. Dr. Gradus's research interests are in the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related disorders, with a particular focus on suicide outcomes. She was the winner of the 2009 Lilienfeld Student Prize from the Society for Epidemiologic Research for her paper on the association between PTSD and death from suicide in the population of Denmark. Dr. Gradus has been the recipient of multiple National Institute of Mental Health and foundation grant awards to conduct psychiatric epidemiologic research in both veterans and the general population.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this seminar recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in suicide causes, evidence and prevention
  • Format: Recorded Seminar/Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Thursday, October 8, 2020 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_SSPAN2.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 1: Understanding Suicide

    Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 3: Addressing Suicide
  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Seminar Recording

This is the second part in a three-part symposium on suicide at BUSPH, including two keynotes. BUSPH symposia are conversations about things that affect the health of populations. These keynotes aim to address the persistent and daunting challenge of suicide. We are bringing top experts in the world to discuss causes and potential ways to prevent suicide to improve the health of populations.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar recording, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of goals set by global agencies for prevention of suicide and the trends in suicide over time.
  • Describe association of suicide rates and geographic region, gender, race, age, and income level
  • Identify elements of WHO’s Live Life, evidence-based recommendations for suicide prevention
  • Discuss the NIMH suicide prevention priorities in health care to achieve 2025 goal of reducing suicide by 20%
  • Describe the experience of at least two evidence-based interventions (e.g., fast-acting therapeutics; long-term interventions in childhood (e.g., good behavior game))
  • Discuss how to use risk identification strategies to target preventative interventions

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


    Subject Matter Experts


  • Josh Gordon

    Director, National
    Institute of
    Mental Health


  • Devora Kestel

    Director, WHO Dept. of Mental Health and Substance Abuse

  • Dévora Kestel is a senior mental health policy specialist with more than twenty five years of international experience in Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America, implementing and advising governments on national policies related to mental health systems. She is a strong advocate for the rights of people with mental health issues.
    Ms Kestel obtained her MSc in Psychology from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, in Argentina and her MSc in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. After completing her university studies in Argentina she worked for 10 years in the development and supervision of community-based mental health services in Trieste, Italy. In 2000 she joined the World Health Organization (WHO) as a mental health officer first in Kosovo and then in Albania where she became the WHO Representative to Albania. In both countries, she worked closely with the Ministries of Health to help establish comprehensive community-based mental health systems.
    In 2007 Ms Kestel joined the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) as the Sub-regional Mental Health Advisor for the English Speaking Caribbean Countries, based in Barbados. In 2011 Ms. Kestel was appointed to the position of the Regional Mental Health Advisor, at the headquarters in Washington DC, providing technical cooperation in the mental health field to the entire region. In 2015 she became the Unit Chief for Mental Health and Substance Use at PAHO/WHO. Over the years, Ms. Kestel has contributed to and co-authored to publications in the area of mental health.
    Since 2019 Ms Kestel is the WHO Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Use.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this seminar recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health workforce interested in suicide causes, evidence and prevention
  • Format: Recorded Seminar/Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Thursday, October 1, 2020 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137_SSPAN1.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills and Public Health Sciences Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 2: Stopping Suicide

    Stopping Suicide: A Population Health Approach to Preventing Suicide PANEL 3: Addressing Suicide

  • Supplemental materials: None
  • Pre-requisites: None


About this Seminar Recording

This is the first part in a three-part symposium on suicide at BUSPH. BUSPH symposia are conversations about things that affect the health of populations. We know that economic stressors, such as those from COVID, are linked to suicide. How can we as a public health practice community mitigate these issues in coming years?

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar recording, participants will be able to:

  • List 6 factors associated with higher suicide rates in geographic regions across the United States
  • Discuss the comparative efficacy of suicide prevention strategies that focus on getting individuals into treatment vs. reducing access to lethal means
  • Describe Thomas Joiner’s Interpersonal Theory of Suicide
  • Discuss harm reduction activities aimed at reducing suicide by firearms
  • Discuss factors that influence differing rates of suicide among African-Americans
  • Describe methods for identifying at-risk individuals useful in healthcare settings
  • Identify risk factors – related both to the individual and the campus environment – for suicide among college students

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


    Subject Matter Experts


  • Amy Barnhorst

    Vice Chair, Community Psychiatry, UC Davis


  • Jennifer Stuber

    Associate Professor, University of Washington


  • Rheeda Walker

    Professor, University of Houston


  • Matt Nock

    Professor of Psychology, Harvard University


  • Sarah Lipson

    Assistant Professor, Boston University

  • Sarah Ketchen Lipson, PhD, EdM is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Law Policy and Management at the Boston University School of Public Health. She is co-Principal Investigator of the Healthy Minds Study and Associate Director of the Healthy Minds Network. Dr. Lipson's research focuses on understanding and addressing mental health inequalities in adolescent and young adult populations, especially college students. She employs varied methodologies, including large-scale epidemiological surveys and population-level interventions. Her work has been featured in the Boston Globe, New York Times, Huffington Post, and on NPR. Dr. Lipson teaches Research Theory and Design and Applied Studies in Health Services Research, and is faculty director of the Master's of Science in Health Services and Systems Research at BUSPH. Dr. Lipson completed a dual PhD at University of Michigan in Health Services Organization and Policy at the School of Public Health and Higher Education at the School of Education, where she was awarded best dissertation of the year. She holds a master’s from Harvard University and was a Fulbright scholar. She received her bachelor’s degree from Tufts University where she graduated with honors.


  • Lynn Jolicoeur

    Producer and Reporter, WBUR

  • Lynn Jolicoeur is a field producer, reporter and editor at WBUR. As field producer, she researches and writes host interview segments and feature stories on a vast array of topics for the signature early-evening news program, All Things Considered. Lynn also reports for the station’s local broadcasts (with some stories airing nationally on NPR, as well). She has developed beats covering mental illness and homelessness. She has reported in depth on efforts to end chronic homelessness, the weaknesses in the system for sheltering and housing adults experiencing homelessness, and the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on the homeless population. Lynn has become passionate about reporting on the issue of suicide. In 2015 she produced and reported a 15-part, yearlong series on the suicide crisis. Prior to working at WBUR, Lynn was a television reporter for 18 years – most recently at Boston’s WCVB-TV Channel 5. She covered areas from crime and the justice system to politics, medicine, and social issues.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this seminar recording. If you have any trouble accessing the recording, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

COVID-19: State of the Science

What is the latest science known about COVID-19, and what do we still need to learn?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public interested in the science of COVID-19
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Recorded Tuesday, September 15, 2020 9:00 AM -10:30 AM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1.5 hours
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: SS1131137.
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Public Health Sciences Skills 
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

    Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

The seminar brings together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic, exploring what we know now, and what we still need to learn.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. Our Dean’s Signature Programs bring speakers to our campus to engage in thoughtful conversations about the pressing issues of public health. They are open to our entire community, designed to inform, stimulate, and encourage groundbreaking discussion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the influence of increased testing on the rate of patients requiring hospitalization
  • Rank order the effectiveness (based on current evidence) of various treatment modalities, including convalescent plasma, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, and supportive care
  • Describe the effect of school closures on the spread of the disease and the learning of children
  • List 3 gaps and challenges experienced in the early stages of the pandemic in the United States and possible solutions to address them in the future
  • Define “herd immunity threshold” and describe factors that influence it

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, BU SPH

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


Subject Matter Experts


  • Hallie Prescott

    Associate Professor
    University of Michigan

  • Dr. Hallie Prescott is a member of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. She graduated from Middlebury College with a B.A. in Molecular Biology. She completed medical school and Internal Medicine residency training at The Ohio State University, where she also served as chief medical resident. In 2011, she was recruited to University of Michigan for Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine fellowship. In 2014, Hallie completed her fellowship training and graduated with a Master’s of Science in Health & Healthcare Research.
    Hallie conducts health services research to understand and improve the long-term outcomes of acute medical illnesses. Her initial focus is reducing the need for repeated hospitalization after severe sepsis. She has found that the rate of hospitalization following severe sepsis exceeds patients’ baseline rate of hospitalization as well as that of carefully matched controls. Furthermore, in more recent work published in JAMA, Hallie has found that 42% of hospitalizations in the 90 days after sepsis occur for potentially preventable conditions—recurrent sepsis, less severe infection, heart failure, etc.
    In addition to her research in Medicare beneficiaries, Hallie has also partnered with investigators at Kaiser Permanente to examine hospital readmissions and healthcare utilization of sepsis survivors within Kaiser’s integrated healthcare delivery system. After accounting for the differences in age between the Medicare and Kaiser cohorts, the findings were remarkably similar between these cohorts. The consistent findings across studies demonstrates the pervasiveness of re-hospitalization and new morbidity after sepsis.
    While much of the current research on re-hospitalization focuses whether or not readmission penalties are “fair” to hospitals, Hallie’s work focuses on how to improve outcomes for patients.
    Hallie’s work draws on the tools of health services research, “big data” analytics, and implementation science. Her K08 will build the foundation for future translational research to uncover the biologic mechanisms of long-term morbidity post-sepsis and for future clinical interventions to improve the recovery and reduce healthcare utilization of severe sepsis survivors.


  • Gabriel Leung

    Dean of Medicine, University of Hong Kong

  • Gabriel Leung is the fortieth Dean of Medicine (2013-), inaugural Helen and Francis Zimmern Professor in Population Health and holds the Chair of Public Health Medicine at the University of Hong Kong (HKU). He was the last Head of Community Medicine (2012-3) at the University as well as Hong Kong’s first Under Secretary for Food and Health (2008-11) and fifth Director of the Chief Executive’s Office (2011-2) in government.
    He is an elected member of the US National Academy of Medicine and was awarded the Gold Bauhinia Star (second highest civilian honour) by the Hong Kong government for distinguished service in protecting and promoting population health.
    A specialist in public health medicine, Leung’s interdisciplinary work revolves around topics that have major population health impact locally, where Hong Kong is a reliable and unique epidemiologic sentinel for mainland China and the Chinese diaspora, or where the SAR is best placed to address the fundamental science at hand globally.
    Leung is one of Asia’s leading epidemiologists and global health exponents, having authored more than 500 scholarly papers with an h-index of 65 (Scopus). His research defined the epidemiology of three novel viral epidemics, namely SARS in 2003, influenza A(H7N9) in 2013 and most recently COVID-19. He led Hong Kong government’s efforts against pandemic A(H1N1) in 2009. He was founding co-director of HKU’s World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Control (2014-8) and currently directs the Laboratory of Data Discovery for Health at the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park (2020-).
    In parallel, Leung leads several large-scale longitudinal cohorts (Children of 1997, FAMILY, Department of Health Elderly Health Service cohort), tracking tens of thousands of lives to study the fundamental causes of non-communicable conditions and to explain the health impacts of contemporary social phenomena.
    A final strand of his work concerns the economics and policy issues of health systems. His team is the government’s health accountant and projects health care human resources needs. Regionally, Leung has tirelessly worked to build capacity throughout the Asia Pacific. He served as founding Chair of the Asia Pacific Observatory on Health Systems Policies (2010-14) and continues to lead its Strategic Technical Advisory Committee (2018-).
    Leung regularly advises national and international agencies including the World Health Organisation, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Boao Forum for Asia, Institut Pasteur, Japan Center for International Exchange and China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is an Adjunct Professor of Peking Union Medical College Hospital and Adjunct Professorial Researcher of the China National Health Development Research Center.
    Locally, he was Vice President and Censor in Public Health Medicine of the Hong Kong College of Community Medicine (2006-8), and an elected council member of the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine (2012-9). He is a member of the Hospital Authority (2013-) and completed two terms on the University Grants Committee (2014-9), which are respectively a statutory agency responsible for all public health care services and a government advisory body on the development and funding requirements of the higher education sector.
    He edited the Journal of Public Health (2007-14), was inaugural co-editor of Epidemics, associate editor of Health Policy and is founding deputy editor-in-chief of China CDC Weekly. He currently serves on the editorial boards of seven journals, including the British Medical Journal.
    After reading medicine at the University of Western Ontario, he completed family medicine residency training in Toronto. He earned a master’s from Harvard University and research doctorate from HKU.


  • Gabriela Gomes

    Professor, University of Strathclyde Glasgow

  • I have 30 years of research experience in nonlinear dynamics. With initial interests in the abstraction of symmetries governing pattern formation in natural and experimental systems, in the last 20 years my research activity has primarily involved mathematical modelling of infectious disease dynamics and epidemiology. Over the last 10 years, I became increasingly appreciative of the need to build and promote new infectious disease epidemiology theory to account for individual variation in characteristics that are under selection, especially when selection forces are dynamic. These characteristics may not be heritable, in which case selection affects each generation while being invisible to current evolutionary theory, which to some extent also needs to be re-examined. More generally, whether we refer to populations of humans, animals, microbes, or cells, the idea that in every observational or experimental study there is always a degree of unobserved heterogeneity that can reverse the direction of our conclusions is unsettling, but the issue can be tackled by general mathematical formalisms that account for it combined with study designs that enable its estimation.
    Ten years ago, I encountered a concept that transformed the way I think about populations. The idea of frailty variation was introduced in demography 40 years ago to describe variation in individual longevity. As the frailest individuals are removed earlier from a heterogeneous cohort, death rates decline over time creating an impression that individual longevity is increasing even when it is not. This is the simplest realisation of a phenomenon that has manifold manifestations in any study that involves counting the individuals that constitute a population over time, across environments or experimental conditions. It appears to explain a wide range of reported discrepancies between studies and contribute to resolve decade-long debates, such as why vaccines appear less efficacious where disease burdens are high, why mathematical models tend to overpredict the impact of disease control measures and whether niche mechanisms need to be invoked to explain the levels of biodiversity observed in nature. I have reformulated these and other problems and have been privileged to collaborate with colleagues around the world.


  • Caitlin Rivers

    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg SPH

  • Dr. Rivers is a Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on improving public health preparedness and response, particularly by improving capabilities for “outbreak science” and infectious disease modeling to support public health decision making.
    Dr. Rivers participated as author or contributor in influential reports that are guiding the US response to COVID-19, including National Coronavirus Response: A Roadmap to Reopening; A National COVID-19 Surveillance System: Achieving Containment; Filling in the Blanks: National Research Needs to Guide Decisions about Reopening Schools in the United States; and A National Plan to Enable Comprehensive COVID-19 Case Finding and Contact Tracing in the US. She is the lead author on the report Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors which is being used by, the National Governors Association, the state of Maryland, and the District of Columbia to guide reopening plans. In May 2020, Dr. Rivers testified in front of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies on the COVID-19 Response.
    Prior to joining the Center for Health Security in 2017, Dr. Rivers worked as an epidemiologist for the United States Army Public Health Center as a Department of Defense SMART Scholar. She also participated in a National Science and Technology Council’s Pandemic Prediction and Forecasting Science and Technology working group. Dr. Rivers serves as an Associate Editor of the journal Health Security.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Media, Social Media and COVID-19

What roles have media and social media played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus response and health after the pandemic.
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday April 23, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04232020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

    Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar will explore the roles that media and social media have played in shaping both the national and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how media will shape our health in the pandemic’s aftermath. Hosted in collaboration with WBUR.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence for negative health consequences of excessive exposure to media
  • Identify evidence-based recommendations for how media cover and report experiences such as COViD-19 pandemic
  • Name 7 traits of crisis news reporting that enhance its benefit to the public
  • Identify potential avenues of research about the association of media coverage and consumption on public health
  • Name 5 ways consumers can assess the trust-worthiness of media coverage

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

Subject Matter Experts


  • Margaret Low

    Chief Executive Officer, WBUR
    Boston’s NPR News Station

  • Margaret Low is the CEO of WBUR, Boston’s NPR News Station. Low joined WBUR after five years at The Atlantic and before that a long and distinguished career at NPR. At WBUR, she leads one of public radio’s premier stations, with the biggest newsroom in the system. In addition to its rich local reporting, WBUR produces a slate of national programs, on air and online, that reach millions of people. Before joining WBUR, Low was a Senior Vice President at The Atlantic and President of its events division. AtlanticLIVE produces more than 100 editorial events a year across the country. Prior to The Atlantic, Low was NPR’s Senior Vice President for News, where she ran the award winning news division and the work of 400+ journalists. Low also spent nine years as NPR’s Vice President for Programming, where she developed the live events strategy for the hit show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and oversaw all program acquisitions including Car Talk and Fresh Air.


  • Roxane Cohen Silver

    Professor of Psychological Science, Medicine, and Public Health, University of California Irvine

  • Roxane Cohen Silver, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, the Department of Medicine, and the Program in Public Health at the University of California, Irvine, where she has been actively involved in research, teaching, mentoring and administration since 1989. An international expert in the field of stress and coping, she has spent the past three decades studying acute and long-term psychological and physical reactions to stressful life experiences, including personal traumas such as physical disability, loss, and childhood sexual victimization, as well as larger collective events such as war, firestorms, the Columbine High School shootings, the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and other community disasters across the world (including the 2010 8.8 earthquake in Chile and the 2006 destructive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia). Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the US Public Health Service. Since December 2003, Dr. Silver has served on numerous senior advisory committees and task forces for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, providing ongoing advice to DHS and its component agencies on the psychological impact of disasters and terrorism. She is also one of the founding Directors of Psychology Beyond Borders, an international nonprofit organization that facilitates research, intervention and policy development in the prevention, preparedness and response to terror attacks, conflict, or natural disasters across the world. Dr. Silver is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (in 4 Divisions) and the Association for Psychological Science. In 2007 Dr. Silver received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Service to Psychological Science and in 2010 she received the Public Advocacy Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (for “outstanding and fundamental contributions to advancing social understanding of trauma”). In 2011 she received the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (Senior Career) and the Award for Outstanding Service to the Field of Trauma Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division 56 (Trauma Psychology).


  • Elana Newman

    McFarlin Professor of Psychology
    University of
    Tulsa

  • Elana Newman, McFarlin Professor of Psychology at the University of Tulsa, has conducted research on a variety of topics regarding the psychological and physical response to traumatic life events, assessment of PTSD in children and adults, journalism and trauma, and understanding the impact of participating in trauma-related research from the trauma survivor’s perspective. She is a past president of the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies, the world’s premier organization dedicated to trauma treatment, education, research, public policy concerns and theoretical formulation. Her work in journalism and trauma has focused on occupational health of journalists and she and her students have several studies underway examining the effects of journalistic practice upon consumers. She was the key investigator on the Dart Center’s research survey on photojournalists’ exposure to trauma. She co-directed the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma’s first satellite office in NYC after 9-11.


  • Mariette DiChristina

    Dean, Boston University College of Communication, Science journalist.

  • Mariette DiChristina is the dean of the College of Communication at Boston University and a nationally recognized science journalist. Before arriving in 2019, DiChristina was the editor-in-chief and executive vice president of Scientific American, as well as executive vice president, magazines, of the magazine’s publisher, Springer Nature. The first woman to head Scientific American since its founding in 1845, she led the editorial team to honors including the coveted National Magazine Award for General Excellence. In her Springer Nature role, she oversaw an editorial and publishing staff of more than 160 people across 10 countries. Previously, DiChristina served as president of the National Association of Science Writers and as executive editor of Popular Science, where she was named Editor of the Year by the magazine’s publisher, Times Mirror Magazines. She also served as a part-time associate professor and visiting scholar in the graduate Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism and a science writer in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Boston University recognized her work in 2016 with a Distinguished Alumni Award. Beyond her role as dean, DiChristina chairs the Steering Group for the “Top 10 Emerging Technologies” for the World Economic Forum and is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She served as a committee member of the Climate Communications Initiative for the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation advocating for federal funding of basic scientific research.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Climate Change and Health: Learning from COVID-19

How has this pandemic sharpened our thinking around how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post COVID era?

logo_NEPHTC NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and thinking on climate change
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, May 14, 2020 4:00-5:00 PM ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 0.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 05142020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. The pandemic has sharpened our thinking and informed insights around climate change, impacting how systems respond and what conversations on climate change will look like in a post-COVID era.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe health effects and their costs as a result of climate change
  • Name 5 interventions that benefit both health and climate
  • Name 3 lessons from COVID-19 experience that inform climate change action
  • Explain the influence of both COVID-19 and climate change on health inequity

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

      Subject Matter Experts


      • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

        Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
        Boston University School of Public Health

      • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.


      • Mona Sarfaty

        Director, Program for Climate and Health, George Mason
        University

      • Mona Sarfaty, MD MPH FAAFP, is the Director of the Program on Climate and Health in the Center for Climate Change Communication. The Program collaborates with medical societies and research organizations to increase awareness, research, and preventive activity regarding the health effects of climate change. As a family medicine professor and physician for over 30 years, Dr. Sarfaty has engaged in research and teaching focused on primary care, cancer screening, and public policy, including the health effects of climate change. She has lectured at national and regional venues including medical societies, health plans, health departments, professional organizations, and government conferences. Dr. Sarfaty is the author of widely circulated guides and articles on how to increase cancer screening rates in practice and on improving practice outcomes by using the features of the patient centered medical home. Since 2003, Dr. Sarfaty has been on the faculty of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia as Associate Professor of Family Medicine. She has engaged in research, teaching, and patient care. She has held a joint appointment in the Jefferson School of Population Health. From 1992-2003, she was on the faculty of the George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center with a joint appointment in the GWU School of Public Health and Health Services. During her years at GWU, she was the Medical Director of the Montgomery County Cancer Crusade and the Primary Care Coalition of Montgomery County, and the Founding Director of the Community Oriented Primary Care Track of the MPH Program. From 1985-92, Dr. Sarfaty served as the Associate Director for Health Policy and Senior Health Policy Advisor for the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources (the principal authorizing committee in the Senate for health programs). She authored major pieces of legislation, planned hearings, and advised Senators on both sides of the aisle. Dr. Sarfaty has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians since 1980. She is a long time member of American Public Health Association (APHA), where she has served as Chair and Governing Councilor of the Medical Care Section. She also served on the Board of Directors for the Association of Prevention Teachers and Researchers (APTR), the professional arm of the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sarfaty is an invited member of the distinguished National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. She has received many awards for her work. Selected publications are listed below.


      • Renee Salas

        Yerby Fellow, Center for Climate, Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public  Health

      • Renee N. Salas, MD, MPH, MS is a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an emergency medicine physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). She received her Doctor of Medicine from the innovative five-year medical school program to train physician-investigators at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. She concurrently obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Research from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she received a Master of Public Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with a concentration in environmental health while completing a Fellowship in Wilderness Medicine at MGH. She now has a sole academic concentration on climate change and health. As a 2018 Burke Fellow, she is addressing the current research gaps in this field. She served as the lead for the 2018 Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change U.S. Brief and is a nationally recognized leader on this subject.


      • Jalonne White-Newsome

        Senior Program
        Officer,
        The Kresge
        Foundation

      • Jalonne L. White-Newsome is a senior program officer at The Kresge Foundation, responsible for the Environment Program’s grant portfolio on Climate Resilient and Equitable Water Systems (CREWS). Jalonne is also a core team member of Kresge’s Climate Change, Health and Equity Initiative, supporting grantmaking across the public health sector. Before joining Kresge in 2016, Jalonne served as director of federal policy at West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. (WE ACT), where she led national campaigns to ensure that the concerns of low-income communities of color were integrated into federal policy, particularly on issues of clean air, climate change and health. She is an adjunct professor at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. As a researcher on climate, health and equity, Jalonne was a lead author for the human health chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. She provides leadership on various boards, including the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Change and Society, the US Climate Action Network, Health Environmental Funder’s Network Steering Committee and the Urban Water Funder’s Group. A native of Detroit, Jalonne earned a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Southern Methodist University and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northwestern University. Jalonne has recently been recognized by Who’s Who in America, The Environmental Management Association’s Environmental Achievement Award, the Michigan League of Conservation Voters and is a 2017 PLACES Fellow alum with The Funders Network.


      • Greg Wellenius

        Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health

      • Gregory Wellenius is an associate professor of epidemiology in the Brown School of Public Health. His research focuses on the environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease, including in China. Much of his work has examined the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of cardiovascular events and its effects on cardiovascular physiology. In the context of these studies, he has used tools from the fields of epidemiology and toxicology to: 1) evaluate the association between environmental exposures and disease, 2) identify subgroups of the population that may be particularly susceptible, and 3) elucidate the physiologic mechanisms for the observed effects. Wellenius has served as a research consultant to the Chinese government’s Center for Disease Control (CDC), and is currently engaged with the Chinese CDC in collaborative empirical research.

      Registration

      Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

      Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

      * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

What are the long-tail health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic? How will the social and economic changes from the pandemic shape population health in coming years and decades?

logo_NEPHTC  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and economic downturn
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 16, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04162020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the long-tail health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. The experts will examine the social and economic changes that have emerged as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and how these changes will shape population health in the coming years and decades.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe evidence that may imply possible negative effects of COVID pandemic on in utero effects on developing fetus
  • Describe evidence for negative health consequences from previous economic downturns
  • Identify major risk factors and mitigating factors for long-term adverse economic consequences of pandemic
  • Describe health outcomes of people who entered the labor market at times of economic recessions

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

    Subject Matter Experts


    • Janet Currie

      Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University

    • Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Co-director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Wellbeing. She also co-directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is the President of the American Society of Health Economics, has served as the Vice President of the American Economics Association, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and of the American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Society of Labor Economists, and of the Econometric Society, and has honorary degrees from the University of Lyon and the University of Zurich. She was named a Nomis Distinguished Scientist in 2018. She has served on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science, as the Editor of the Journal of Economic Literature, and on the editorial boards of many other journals. Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, and the important role of mental health.


    • Catherine Maclean

      Associate Professor, Temple University, Co-Editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis and Mgmt.

    • Professor Maclean’s research uses health and labor economic theory to empirically explore the causes and consequences of substance use, mental health, insurance coverage, and labor market outcomes. She is particularly interested in the role of public policies in influencing these outcomes. Professor Maclean is a Research Associate in the Health Economics Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics. She is a Co-Editor at the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. Her recent work examines the effect of insurance regulations, tobacco control regulations, and access to healthcare services. Professor Maclean’s research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the American Cancer Society.


    • Arjumand Siddiqi

       Associate Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    • Arjumand Siddiqi is Canada Research Chair in Population Health Equity and Associate Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, where she also holds appointments in the Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and the Hospital For Sick Children, as well as at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
      Dr. Siddiqi is interested in understanding how societal conditions produce and resolve inequities in population health and human development across the lifespan. Her research focuses primarily on the roles of resource inequities and social policies, the methods and metrics that enable scientific inquiry on health inequities, and mechanisms related to public and political uptake of evidence.
      Dr. Siddiqi is an alumnus of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Global Academy and former Associate Member of its Program on Successful Societies. She was also a member of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health Knowledge Hub on Early Child Development, and has consulted to several international agencies including the World Bank and UNICEF. Dr. Siddiqi received her doctorate in Social Epidemiology from Harvard School of Public Health.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

What is the role of cities in creating the conditions for health, particularly in a time of pandemic? How can cities be rebuilt with a focus on resilience and on promoting healthy populations?

BUSPH Boston University School of Public Health Logo  NCHEC CHES Logo

Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic, design and urban infrastructure
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 30, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04302020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar will explore the role of cities in creating the conditions for health, particularly in a time of pandemic. It will address how cities can be rebuilt with a focus on resilience and on promoting healthy populations. Cohosted with the Boston University Initiative on Cities.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.
NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe principal design considerations for adaptation during pandemic
  • Name 5 practical ways to create more space for people going forward
  • Name 3 design elements in health care settings that have been prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Describe 4 ways in which “resiliency” can be reflected in redesigning urban infrastructure
  • Describe 4 methods to foster “green” infrastructure and environment

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

Subject Matter Experts


  • Jennifer Keesmaat, CEO

    The Keesmaat Group
    and
    Former Chief Planner
    Toronto

  • Jennifer Keesmaat is an urban planner passionate about creating places where people flourish. Named one of the “most powerful people in Canada” by Macleans, one of the “most influential” by Toronto Life, and one of the top Women of Influence in Canada, she spent five years as Toronto’s Chief City Planner, where she was celebrated for her forward thinking and collaborative approach to city-building.
    A Distinguished Visitor in Residence Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Keesmaat continues to share her vision for cities of the future, and her belief in the importance of public sector leadership through a variety of publications including The Guardian, Macleans, The Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and on her podcast, Invisible City. Keesmaat is on the Advisory Board of the Urban Land Institute, Toronto, and is appointed to the International Panel of Experts, Singapore Urban Redevelopment Authority.
    Over the past fifteen years, as a founding partner of the Office for Urbanism and subsequently Dialog, Keesmaat worked in municipalities across Canada and around the world on urban design guidelines, official plan reviews and strategies for creating dense, walkable cities. Her planning practice is characterized by an emphasis on collaborations across sectors, and broad engagement with municipal staff, councils, developers, business leaders, NGO’s, and residents associations. Keesmaat has been recognized for her expertise in transit planning, heritage preservation, strategy development, communications, sustainable economic development and the creation of walkable, complete communities.
    In 2018, Keesmaat ran for Mayor in the City of Toronto on a progressive, visionary platform that included addressing the housing crisis by building at scale on city-owned land and implementing a Rent-to-Own program; neighbourhood-based crime prevention through the development of Community Wellbeing Plans for each neighbourhood in the city; redesigning city streets to prioritize vulnerable users such as children, seniors, pedestrian and cyclists; the development of five Cultural Hubs to instigate renewal outside of the core; and the tearing down of the Gardiner Expressway to build a new walkable, transit-oriented waterfront neighbourhood community.
    Keesmaat has a Combined Honours degree in Philosophy and English from the University of Western Ontario, and a Masters in Environmental Studies, Politics and Planning, from York University. As a Registered Professional Planner, her work has been repeatedly recognized by professional associations, including as the recipient of the 2016 President’s Award of Excellence, from the Canadian Institute of Planners; the 2016 Bryden Alumni Award, York University, the 2017 City Builders Award from EDIT/the Design Exchange; the International Placemaking Award, City of Lyon, France 2017; and most recently, the 2019 The Edmund N. Bacon Award from the Center for Architecture and Design, Philadelphia.
    Her award-winning and widely acclaimed podcast can be found at invisiblecitypodcast.com. In it, she talks about a broad range of future city and technological topics, including access to food security in The Cauliflower Crisis, how to plan for autonomous vehicles in The Future of the City, The Future of the Car; and the opportunity of raising kids in dense, urban environments in 5 Kids, One Condo. Jennifer also brings light to the biggest challenges facing cities in her Within Reach podcast, in partnership with Newstalk 1010.


  • Katie Swenson

    Senior Principal
    MASS Design
    Group
    Boston, MA

  • Katie joined MASS in 2020 as a Senior Principal. Before joining MASS full time, she served as a board member for three years, providing insight on how design practice promotes economic and social equity, environmental sustainability, and healthy communities. Previously the vice president of Design & Sustainability at Enterprise Community Partners, Inc., she is an expert in affordable housing, community development, and leadership cultivation.
    A member of the second class of Enterprise Rose Fellowship, Swenson was tapped to grow and lead the program in 2007, after completing her fellowship with the Piedmont Housing in Charlottesville. Under her leadership, Swenson has recruited and mentored 85 fellows who are the next generation of leaders in architecture and community development.
    Following her Rose fellowship, Swenson founded the Charlottesville Community Design Center in Charlottesville and, in partnership with Habitat for Humanity, led it to establish an international design competition. Based on the innovations that emerged from the competition and work, she co-authored “Growing Urban Habitats: Seeking a New Housing Development Model” with William Morrish and Susanne Schindler.
    Katie has taught at the Boston Architectural College and Parsons School of Design at The New School, and lectured extensively on sustainable community development and affordable housing. She holds a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from the University of California-Berkeley and a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. She was a 2018-2019 Loeb Fellow at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.
    She is the author of the forthcoming publication, “Design With Love,” stories from 20 years of the Enterprise Rose Fellowship, with photography by Harry Connolly. The book will be published in August 2020 by Schiffer Publishing.


  • Joan Saba

    Healthcare architecture and
    planning
    Partner, NBBJ

  • Specializing in healthcare architecture and planning, Joan Saba brings more than 25 years of expertise and strategic vision to all types of healthcare projects, with a focus on academic medical centers, pediatric and teaching hospitals.
    Joan’s expertise in translating current and future programmatic and operational needs into effective healing environments is applied to projects of diverse scales. She has developed long-term client relationships with a range of prestigious healthcare organizations and has advised on some of the nation’s most pressing healthcare design issues. Joan is a trusted advisor to boards and senior management teams in developing and implementing strategies and capital planning tailored to specific organizational needs.
    She has recently led the healthcare planning and design efforts on the Kimmel Pavilion at New York University’s Langone Medical Center and a new medical center at the American University of Beirut. Her recent work on the Massachusetts General Hospital Lunder Building has won numerous design and industry awards, including a National Healthcare Design Award from the AIA Academy of Architecture for Health.
    Recognized as an industry expert and dynamic educator, Joan is frequently asked to lecture and teach on trends and innovations in the planning and design of academic healthcare and pediatric environments. She was recently interviewed by Forbes China and Chinese Business News Weekly on recommendations to improve healthcare in China. Recent speaking engagements include presentations at Stanford Medicine X, The Economist Health Care Forum, the Academy of Architecture for Health, Harvard University Graduate School of Design’s Executive Education Program, and the Symposium of Healthcare Design. In 2012, Joan was named as one of Healthcare Design magazine’s HCD 10. She was also a recipient of the AIA / Academy of Architecture for Health’s Presidential Citation Award and was included in Healthcare Design’s list of “Twenty Who Are Making a Difference.”


  • Katharine Lusk

    Executive Director, Boston
    University Initiative on Cities

  • Katharine Lusk is the founding Executive Director of the Initiative on Cities at Boston University where she spearheads new university-wide programs and research, including the Menino Survey of Mayors, student government fellowships, original urban scholarship and multi-stakeholder conferences. She also serves as Senior Personnel to the NSF-funded Smart City Cloud Platform project directed by the Hariri Institute and on the Advisory Board of the BU Urban Affairs and City Planning program.
    Katharine was a policy advisor to former Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, where she led his work to make Boston the first city in the country to achieve pay equity for women. In addition to creating the Mayor’s Women’s Workforce Council, she authored, “Boston: Closing the Wage Gap,” identifying evidence-based interventions employers can take to close the gender wage gap. An enthusiastic civic entrepreneur, Katharine launched a new capital fund for child care providers, a platform for women small business owners, Women on Main, and the nation’s first mobile City Hall, City Hall to Go.
    In 2014, she served as an advisor to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s Successful Women, Successful Families Task Force. Prior to entering public service, Katharine worked as a brand strategist and researcher for Fortune 500 companies. She was most recently the VP/Director of Branding with McCann Erickson, the global advertising agency.
    She received a Masters in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where she was the recipient of the Barbara Jordan Award for Women’s Leadership and the Manuel Carballo Award for her graduate thesis modeling state-run paid family leave for Massachusetts. She earned her BA from Williams College.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and mental health
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, April 9, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131137, Event ID: 04092020. If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.
  • Competencies: Policy Development and Program Planning Skills
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings:

    Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores the challenges public health faces in a time of crisis. The speakers will discuss the response to the pandemic from a city and state perspective and what a more effective public health system might look like.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.

NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.

What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Name 6 current challenges faced by public health systems
  • Explain why risk communication is a vital component of public health
  • Name 3 characteristics of successful public health crisis response
  • Identify 6 current efforts to improve public health systems based on gaps illuminated by COVID-19

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

Subject Matter Experts


  • Georges Benjamin

    Executive Director
    American Public
    Health
    Association

  • Georges Benjamin is known as one of the nation’s most influential physician leaders because he speaks passionately and eloquently about the health issues having the most impact on our nation today. From his firsthand experience as a physician, he knows what happens when preventive care is not available and when the healthy choice is not the easy choice. As executive director of APHA since 2002, he is leading the Association’s push to make America the healthiest nation in one generation.
    He came to APHA from his position as secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Benjamin became secretary of health in Maryland in April 1999, following four years as its deputy secretary for public health services. As secretary, Benjamin oversaw the expansion and improvement of the state’s Medicaid program.
    Benjamin, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board-certified in internal medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a fellow emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians and an honorary fellow of the Royal Society of Public Health.
    An established administrator, author and orator, Benjamin started his medical career in 1981 in Tacoma, Wash., where he managed a 72,000-patient visit ambulatory care service as chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at the Madigan Army Medical Center and was an attending physician within the Department of Emergency Medicine. A few years later, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he served as chief of emergency medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. After leaving the Army, he chaired the Department of Community Health and Ambulatory Care at the District of Columbia General Hospital. He was promoted to acting commissioner for public health for the District of Columbia and later directed one of the busiest ambulance services in the nation as interim director of the Emergency Ambulance Bureau of the District of Columbia Fire Department.
    At APHA, Benjamin also serves as publisher of the nonprofit’s monthly publication, The Nation’s Health, the association’s official newspaper, and the American Journal of Public Health, the profession’s premier scientific publication. He is the author of more than 100 scientific articles and book chapters. His recent book The Quest for Health Reform: A Satirical History is an exposé of the nearly 100-year quest to ensure quality affordable health coverage for all through the use of political cartoons.
    Benjamin is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (Formally the Institute of Medicine) of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine and also serves on the boards for many organizations including Research!America and the Reagan-Udall Foundation. In 2008, 2014 and 2016 he was named one of the top 25 minority executives in health care by Modern Healthcare Magazine, in addition to being voted among the 100 most influential people in health care from 2007-2017.
    In April 2016, President Obama appointed Benjamin to the National Infrastructure Advisory Council, a council that advises the president on how best to assure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure.


  • Mary Bassett

    Former Commissioner of Health, Director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

  • Mary T. Bassett is the Director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University, as well as the FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health. With more than 30 years of experience in public health, Dr. Mary Travis Bassett has dedicated her career to advancing health equity. Prior to her directorship at the FXB Center, Dr. Bassett served for four years as commissioner of Health for New York City. As commissioner, she worked to ensure that every New York City neighborhood supported the health of its residents, with the goal of closing gaps in population health across the city.
    Originally from New York City, Dr. Bassett lived in Zimbabwe for nearly 20 years. Previously, she was the Program Director for the African Health Initiative and the Child Well-being Program at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. She received her B.A. in History and Science from Harvard University and her M.D. from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. She served her medical residency at Harlem Hospital Center, and has a master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Washington, where she was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar.


  • John Auerbach

    Former Commissioner of Public Health, President and CEO, Trust for America’s Health

  • John Auerbach is president and CEO of Trust for America’s Health (TFAH). As such he oversees TFAH’s work to promote sound public health policy and make disease prevention a national priority. Over the course of a 30-year career he has held senior public health positions at the federal, state, and local levels. As Associate Director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) he oversaw policy and the agency’s collaborative efforts with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, commercial payers, and large health systems. During his six years as the Commissioner of Public Health for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, he developed innovative programs to promote health equity, combat chronic and infectious disease, and support the successful implementation of the state’s health care reform initiative. As Boston’s health commissioner for nine years, he directed homeless, substance abuse, and emergency medical services for the city as well as a wide range of public health divisions.
    Mr. Auerbach was previously a professor of practice in health sciences and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research and Practice at Northeastern University; program director of one of the country’s first community health centers; and an administrator in a clinical training program at a tertiary care safety-net hospital.

    Registration

    Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

    Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

    * Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH

Coronavirus Seminar Series: Mental Health in a Time of Crisis

We know that trauma can shape health in the near and long term. How can we mitigate the population mental health consequences of COVID-19?

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Register

Course Information

  • Audience: Public health professionals, health professionals, community health workers, public interested in the intersection of coronavirus pandemic and mental health
  • Format: Webinar
  • Date/Time: Thursday, March 26, 2020 4:00-5:00pm ET
  • Price: Free
  • Length: 1 hour 
  • Credential(s) eligible for contact hours: Sponsored by New England Public Health Training Center (NEPHTC), a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1 total Category I continuing education contact hour.  Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hour is 1.  Provider ID: SS1131337 Event ID: 03262020. 
    If you are not seeking  CHES/MCHES contact hours, if you complete the evaluation, you will receive a Certificate of Completion. The Certificate will include the length of the course.

  • Competencies: Community Partnership Skills 
  • Learning Level: Awareness
  • Companion Trainings: Coronavirus Seminar Series by BUSPH

    Building the Public Health System of the Future

    After COVID-19: (Re)Building Resilient Cities

    COVID-19: The Health Consequences of the Consequences

  • Supplemental materials: NA
  • Pre-requisites: None

About this Seminar

This seminar explores population mental health in the context of COVID-19. We know that the pandemic is an extreme stressor, and has multiple characteristics that are toxic to mental health.

Note: This seminar was developed and recorded by BUSPH. The BUSPH Coronavirus Seminar Series addresses different aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, bringing together experts to discuss the causes and consequences of this global pandemic. The seminars aim to provide our community and the public with state-of-the-science information about the pandemic and its intersection with public health and keep us all connected to one another during this time.

NEPHTC is making this recording available to the public health workforce with CHES credits and a certificate of completion.


What you'll learn

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Name 4 characteristics that make the COVID-19 pandemic toxic to mental health
  • Describe 2 examples of negative mental health impact from past pandemics
  • Describe 5 characteristics of a concerted mental health effort during and following the pandemic
  • Name 5 empirically-supported elements that are help people adapt in ongoing threat situations

Moderator


  • Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH

    Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor
    Boston University School of Public Health

  • Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow.

Subject Matter Experts


  • Karestan Koenen, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

  • Karestan C. Koenen, PhD aims to reduce the population burden of mental disorders through research, training, and advocacy. She is passionate about using science to overcome violence and trauma, which are major preventable causes of health problems globally.
    Dr. Koenen’s research focus is three-fold. First, she studies why some people develop PTSD and related mental and physical health problems and why some people are resilient when exposed to similar traumatic events. Dr. Koenen is a co-principal investigator on the NIMH-funded AURORA study, led by Dr. Samuel McLean with Drs. Ronald Kessler and Kerry Ressler. Dr. Koenen also co-leads the PTSD working group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, which aims to identify genetic variants that increase risk and resilience following trauma exposure. Second, she investigates how violence, trauma, and PTSD alter long-term physical health and accelerate aging. Much of this work is done in collaboration with the Nurses’ Health Study. Third, she aims to expand access to evidence-based mental health treatment for survivors of violence and trauma. To this end, she co-wrote the book, Treating Survivors of Childhood Abuse: Psychotherapy for the Interrupted Life with Drs. Marylene Cloitre and Lisa Cohen.
    Dr. Koenen leads the NIMH-funded Training Program in Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics (T32) and the Interdisciplinary Concentration in Population Mental Health. She also advises masters and doctoral degree students in the Departments of Epidemiology and Social Behavioral Sciences. In addition, Dr. Koenen leads the Trauma Epidemiology and Population Mental Health Research Group for her students and post-doctoral fellows. The group is primarily a forum for trainees and junior investigators to present and receive feedback on work-in-progress, but also includes presentations on advanced research methodology and career development.
    Dr. Koenen advocates for survivors of violence and trauma. In May 2011, Dr. Koenen testified before the House Foreign Affairs Full Committee about the epidemic of sexual violence and victim blaming culture of the Peace Corps. She has written for the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, and the Women’s Media Center’s Women Under Siege Project, which investigates how rape and other forms of sexualized violence are used as tools in conflict. Dr. Koenen also consulted on the documentary, It Happened Here, which examined the epidemic of sexual assault on university campuses. In addition, Dr. Koenen speaks to lay audiences about the latest scientific findings around violence and trauma.


  • Sarah Lowe, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Yale School of Public Health

  • Sarah Lowe, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Yale School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the long-term mental health consequences of a range of potentially traumatic events, as well as the impact of such events on other domains of functioning, such as physical health, social relationships, and economic wellbeing. Her work explores the mechanisms leading from trauma exposure to symptoms, and the role of factors at various ecological levels—from genetics to neighborhoods—in shaping risk and resilience. She uses a range of methodologies to achieve her research aims, including structural equation modeling, latent growth curve analysis, geospatial modeling, and qualitative analysis, among others. Dr. Lowe received her Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Boston and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training program at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She previously held an appointment in the Department of Psychology at Montclair State University, where she played a key role in developing the department’s first doctoral program.


  • Patricia Watson, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Psychiatry
    Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • Patricia Watson, PhD is a senior educational specialist for the National Center for PTSD and assistant professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, in the Department of Psychiatry. She is co-author of the Psychological First Aid (PFA) Field Guide and the Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) Manual, produced by the National Center for PTSD and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. She is also a co-author of the Combat Operational Stress First Aid (COSFA) Field Guide, produced by the Department of Defense, the Defense Centers for Excellence, and the National Center for PTSD, and the Stress First Aid and Curbside Manner manuals for fire and rescue personnel, produced by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation. She has additionally co-edited three books on disaster behavioral health interventions, numerous articles on resilience and early intervention, SAMHSA guidance documents, and articles and chapters on disaster mental health, resilience, combat and operational stress, and pandemic flu.

Registration

Select the Enroll Me button below to register for this webinar. If you have any trouble accessing the webinar, contact support@nephtc.org.

Acknowledgement: This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31685 “Regional Public Health Training Center Program.” This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

* Yale School of Public Health, Office of Public Health Practice, a New England Public Health Training Center partner, is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. All CHES credit inquiries are managed by YSPH